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Offline Lucidx

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How much radiation can a human tolerate?
« on: 11/06/2009 00:50:00 »
What is the minimum amount of RAD's it takes to kill a full grown human before they have a chance to, own their own power, get up and walk out of the room.

A friend told me theres a chemical called Neumune that can block out radiation from someones body, is this true, if so, how effective is this?

Since there is no (magnetosphere?) surrounding mars, does radiation exist in high levels on the surface during the occurance of solar flares?

How many RAD's does a hiroshima (Fat-Man) sized nuclear bomb produce?

I hear that cancer from radiation is causes by the radiation cutting up DNA which causes mutations, if this is true, does that meen future research in DNA altering experiments in live humands could possibly result in cancer?
« Last Edit: 11/06/2009 04:13:54 by chris »


 

Offline Soul Surfer

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How much radiation can a human tolerate?
« Reply #1 on: 11/06/2009 09:47:31 »
That is quite a lot of questions that I am not sure that I should answer fully

Ionising radiation on its own is not very effective at killing people quickly.  Most of the lethal effects of radiation on its own (ie no blast effects) take time to act and to stop a person in its tracks requires an extremely high dose of radiation way beyond what can normally be generated without significant blast effects.  For nuclear explosives it is the blast and thermal effects that kills people immediately.  Even to kill a person in two days requires a very high dose while lower doses as you know can take much longer to show and there is no safe lower limit.  We are all affected by the natural radiation in our environment and cannot avoid it.

No chemicals/drugs can completely block the effects of ionising radiation.

It is anticipated that humans travelling to mars will need a specially shielded area or shelter to retreat to at times of high solar radiation activity.

The Hiroshima question needs clarification.
A rad is a general measure of the energy deposited in a volume of material by ionising radiation.  This could be used to estimate the radiation dosage on people at various distances from the bomb but it does not apply to the total output of the device  which is usually described in explosive rather than radiation yield because the main aim of most nuclear weapons is an explosion and lots of heat the ionising radiation and fallout is an unfortunate by product of the process used to generate the explosion

Answer to the final question could be yes, but radiation produces uncontrolled genetic changes while genetic modification scientists in general only work with controlled changes and the risks are therefore minimised so in practice the answer is no unless there was for some reason a desire to create an experimental cancer
 

Offline Lucidx

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How much radiation can a human tolerate?
« Reply #2 on: 14/06/2009 05:58:35 »
alright, thanks for explaining.
But regarding the chemical 'neumune' can anyone explain to me how it would block ionizing radiation from the body?

Because radation is tiny particles moving at really fast speeds, so technically it is a physical effect, so how does nuemune block it? does it fortify your DNA? or does is it an agent that absorbs the particles?
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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How much radiation can a human tolerate?
« Reply #3 on: 14/06/2009 06:05:44 »
Aparently it didn't work if you read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neumune

"After being encouraged for 2.5 years that Neumune was in the competitive range, on March 9, 2007, the RFP was canceled by HHS. According to HHS, "the product was no longer in the competitive range". No further explanation was given. As a result, Hollis-Eden has now withdrawn from the radiation countermeasure field."
 

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How much radiation can a human tolerate?
« Reply #3 on: 14/06/2009 06:05:44 »

 

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