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Author Topic: why do we not have Proton stars, yet we have Neutron Stars  (Read 2402 times)

Offline Fluid_thinker

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I was thinking why we have Neutron stars, yet we do not have other stars such as Proton Stars through degeneracy pressure. Protons have quarks like Neutrons.

So i thought hey a proton star is a hot star like our Sun burning Protons e.g. Nuclei of Hydrogen.

So what about cold Protons? Does that make a Dense Star. Probably not due to electric replusion being bigger than gravity. (not sure if this is true).

However, if you take Protons (that have gravitional mass) and an equal number of Electrons, do you cancel the repulsion effect and create a dense star. Hence a Proton/Electon star?

Or am I on the wrong track?


 

Offline Vern

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why do we not have Proton stars, yet we have Neutron Stars
« Reply #1 on: 11/06/2009 11:59:20 »
Quote from: fluid_thinker
So what about cold Protons? Does that make a Dense Star. Probably not due to electric replusion being bigger than gravity. (not sure if this is true).
I think you are right, electric repulsion is the reason we don't see them. However, I'm not sure that we know that neutron stars are composed of neutrons. It may be that there is a composition of matter that we have not yet seen.
 

Offline JP

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why do we not have Proton stars, yet we have Neutron Stars
« Reply #2 on: 11/06/2009 16:41:38 »
http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/faq/black_hole/bhole-65.html

Apparently the gravitational pressure required to form a pure proton star would be enough to form a black hole. 
 

Offline Shadec

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why do we not have Proton stars, yet we have Neutron Stars
« Reply #3 on: 12/06/2009 10:00:02 »
However, if you take Protons (that have gravitional mass) and an equal number of Electrons, do you cancel the repulsion effect and create a dense star. Hence a Proton/Electon star?
If you mixed protons and electrons, i would hypothesise they would bind and form Hydrogen, one proton, one electron. i would have thought anyway, i may be wrong.

in my mind, the protons would repel each other strongly,

but also, it would essentially form a giant ion.
assuming for a moment that they could hold together, and there was only 1000 protons in this 'proton star'.
that would form something like a 1000+ ion, meaning it had an IMMENSELY powerful attraction to anything -ve, ie electrons
 

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why do we not have Proton stars, yet we have Neutron Stars
« Reply #3 on: 12/06/2009 10:00:02 »

 

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