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Author Topic: Pluto's Who Knows  (Read 2340 times)

meta-sci

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Pluto's Who Knows
« on: 21/06/2009 17:09:13 »
Just wish if anyone could  help with a few enquiries concerning Pluto. It would be much appreciated.
1/ What is know of the reasons why Pluto's orbit is so ecclectic?
2/ What is the amount of time spent inside Neptune's orbit?
3/ What is the inclination of both Neptune and Pluto at the initial, centre, and final point5s of obital interaction?
4/ What is the velocities of both Neptune and Pluto at four points of 90 degrees in an anti-clockwise posit6ion with the first point being the centre of the interaction points, if possible,also at the initial and end points of interaction.

P.S. Above enquiries are a request to consider two scenarios, one relative to Pluto's position and Neptune's orbit, and other as vice versa.

Thanx for any time spent with this enquiry.


 

Offline Ophiolite

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« Reply #1 on: 21/06/2009 19:29:50 »
1/ What is know of the reasons why Pluto's orbit is so ecclectic?
I think you mean eccentric. Pluto as we now know is a Kuiper Belt object, one of many large icy bodies that orbit beyond Neptune roughly in the plane of the eccliptic. The orbits of these bodies are typically much more eccentric than the planets.

2/ What is the amount of time spent inside Neptune's orbit?
About twenty years. The last occassion was between January 21 1979 and February 11 1999.

Quote from: meta-sci
What is the inclination of both Neptune and Pluto at the initial, centre, and final point5s of obital interaction?
The inclination remains unchanged regardless of the point in the orbit. Pluto is inclined at 17 deg to the ecliptic, while Neptune is inclined at just under two degrees.

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4/ What is the velocities of both Neptune and Pluto at four points of 90 degrees in an anti-clockwise posit6ion with the first point being the centre of the interaction points, if possible,also at the initial and end points of interaction
I would have to calculate this. Can you tell me what it is you are trying to determine?
 

lyner

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« Reply #2 on: 21/06/2009 23:17:06 »
The orbits are all in planes which include the Sun*. The "inclination" to which we refer is the inclination of the plane of an orbit to the plane which is a sort of average of the planes of all planets.

* Ignoring tiny perturbations due to other bodies in the Solar System -but they are rely really small.
« Last Edit: 21/06/2009 23:19:06 by sophiecentaur »
 

Offline LeeE

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« Reply #3 on: 22/06/2009 01:48:04 »
Heh - I like the idea of an ec[c]lectic orbit

Pluto's orbit is actually quite highly inclined.  Wiki gives two figures; 11.88 to Sun's equator, and 17.141 75, but this last is not qualified and may be relative to several datums.
 

lyner

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« Reply #4 on: 22/06/2009 09:33:13 »
I'm inclined - to agree with you.
 

Offline Ophiolite

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« Reply #5 on: 22/06/2009 12:26:31 »
The "inclination" to which we refer is the inclination of the plane of an orbit to the plane which is a sort of average of the planes of all planets.
Not exactly. Inclinations are usually referred to the ecliptic. That is the plane of the Earth's orbit. The invariable plane is determined from the average of angular momenta of the planets. This is about 1 deg. away from the ecliptic.

I hope we're not all going round in circles here.
 

lyner

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« Reply #6 on: 22/06/2009 13:58:11 »
No - they're mainly ellipses.
 

Offline Ophiolite

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« Reply #7 on: 22/06/2009 18:22:53 »
No - they're mainly ellipses.
Try to focus.
 

meta-sci

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« Reply #8 on: 23/06/2009 07:58:33 »
always arriving with the wrong words, so sorry. and thanks for the replies. Yes, I believe the inclination is relative to Earth's orbit equalling zero. I also gave the wrong description of the inclination enquiry. what was mean I guess is the degree of elevation, concerning the actual point and not of the inclination of orbit. Regarding the reasons requesting this info, I must reply, "Work in progress". Enjoyed the play of words.
 

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« Reply #8 on: 23/06/2009 07:58:33 »

 

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