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Author Topic: Are our trees in danger?  (Read 2114 times)

Offline Don_1

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Are our trees in danger?
« on: 30/06/2009 09:38:52 »
On Saturday, here in SE England, we had some serious hail stones. Two fairly prolonged and heavy downpours of hail stones of around 1cm diameter left us at a friend's BBQ running for shelter.

The following day, I noticed that the ground in woodland areas was strewn with pieces of leaf from the tree canopy. In fact, this is all that could be seen on the ground, a thick bed of leaf pieces, torn off by the hail stones.

Since then, temperatures have continued to rise. Yesterday 40oC was recorded on the centre court at Wimbledon (elsewhere in London 31oC) and forecasters are warning that temperatures will continue to rise.

With so much damage to their leaves, what effect do you think such temperatures could have on the trees?
« Last Edit: 30/06/2009 09:40:56 by Don_1 »


 

Offline Bored chemist

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Are our trees in danger?
« Reply #1 on: 30/06/2009 20:58:41 »
They won't be pleased about it (and it would be interesting, in years to come, to see if there's a thin growth ring for this year) but most of them will survive.
Trees get stripped by insects from time to time, they get by. Also, have you ever seen a tree stump or pollarded tree sprout back again?

 

Offline Don_1

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Are our trees in danger?
« Reply #2 on: 01/07/2009 08:44:17 »
I'm sure you're right BC. I doubt there will be much long term effect, but wonder what the short term might bring. With so much of the canopy so badly damaged in one foul swoop, to what extent will osmosis be affected? As you say, the growth ring for this year could be thin. As for fruiting trees, will this result in small, less juicy fruits due to the trees' restricted ability to transport water and nutrients to where it is needed?
 

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Are our trees in danger?
« Reply #2 on: 01/07/2009 08:44:17 »

 

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