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Author Topic: magnetism question  (Read 1317 times)

Offline thebrain13

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magnetism question
« on: 30/06/2009 23:49:52 »
Lets say you had a circular stretchy wire that as a whole was neutrally charged. But it had a negatively charged substance inside that traveled round and round.

My question is, would the stretchy wire feel magnetism and shrink or expand, or would it not move change?


 

lyner

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magnetism question
« Reply #1 on: 01/07/2009 10:05:20 »
You have just described a loop made of very soft metal.
Put a battery in circuit (that wouldn't violate anything) and you have a single loop of wire with current flowing round it.
There will be a small force on each section of the loop,  pushing the wire outward.
I have never seen it done but I am sure that someone must have done this experiment using a circular trough of mercury and a hefty car battery.
 

Offline syhprum

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magnetism question
« Reply #2 on: 01/07/2009 10:45:37 »
If the generated magnetic field is large so also are the forces expanding the loop, superconducting magnets have to be constructed in a very strong manner as the have a tendency to explode.
 

lyner

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magnetism question
« Reply #3 on: 01/07/2009 15:29:06 »
Yes, aren't they? A current carrying wire in the field of a superconducting magnet would experience a very strong force - with the field  normal to the wire.
F = BiL (to coin a phrase).
The field around each piece of wire in the coils will be similar, I think - so lots of force.
(Even a little transformer will shake itself to bits if it isn't screwed up tight).
« Last Edit: 01/07/2009 15:33:25 by sophiecentaur »
 

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magnetism question
« Reply #3 on: 01/07/2009 15:29:06 »

 

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