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Author Topic: Randomness and quantum mechanics  (Read 20883 times)

Offline wolfekeeper

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Randomness and quantum mechanics
« Reply #50 on: 23/07/2009 05:40:55 »
If that's still true in a few hours, you need to see a doctor about it.  ;)
 

Offline janardhan polanki

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Randomness and quantum mechanics
« Reply #51 on: 17/10/2009 09:41:34 »
sir A S Eddington says  about randomness;   there is always more to the element of randomness in the universe   when the signal drops than when the lever moves ,like i say the more of the element of randomness when the seed sprouts than when the seed drops into the soil .

The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics states that the  collapse of the wave function with its infinite possibilities is againts the onely one of a born certainity of the quantum 10^-27cms during Big Bang seperating space & time from an inseperable unity , which is flux of the universal oneness of a whole.In other words it is the creative force of the quantum randomness that connects the manifest and the nonmanifest universe.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Randomness and quantum mechanics
« Reply #52 on: 17/10/2009 17:03:53 »
Surely the Heisenberg principle implies randomness - due to the uncertainty involved. I.e if the value of a body's position cannot be known exactly then is there not a randomness about that effective position?
Yes it does, correct. The inherent uncertainty in the universe does not seem very deterministic at all.
 

Offline litespeed

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Randomness and quantum mechanics
« Reply #53 on: 02/11/2009 00:26:07 »
Quantum Mechanics is very successful at predicting the probablity of various events such as radioactive decay. This is very useful, of course, but entirely silent on why any given atom decided to add itself to the probablity.

I do not believe in events without cause.  Accordingly, I believe there is something behind the smoky curtain that QM has left out. IMHO the universe has very large numbers of input factors we simply do not have technology or even theory to describe. One of my favorites includes the various Plank Units.

In this world particles never move an infinite number of points to get from A to B. Instead, they simply jump from A to B. Sort of like a movie projector. I simply postulate the particles move into a timeless dimenstion as the our time laden universe moves onward, these particles simply reimerge from their timeless state and do it again and again.

I need to know more about Plank units, but the one I like best is Plank time. I have seen the big bang described Plank time unit by Plank time unit. Plank zero is null. Plank one includes the entire universe in a small area. Plank two includes inflation beyond the speed of light etc etc.

String theory gets a bit gnarly here, but I like the 9 or 11 dimensions it incorporates. Mostly I like the idea the universe has depth that might include, chuckle chuckle, human self awareness. Does each and every congnizant being create, over a lifetime, an entire universe of accumulated self experiences?  There is absolutely no physics that can explain why I seem to think I am separate from you? 

 

Offline Vern

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Randomness and quantum mechanics
« Reply #54 on: 02/11/2009 11:14:06 »
Quote from: litespeed
In this world particles never move an infinite number of points to get from A to B. Instead, they simply jump from A to B. Sort of like a movie projector. I simply postulate the particles move into a timeless dimenstion as the our time laden universe moves onward, these particles simply reimerge from their timeless state and do it again and again.
I have not seen creditable evidence that this is true. In certain circumstances such as tunnelling, we see the appearance of that; meaning it seems that is what happens. But in normal movement of material things I don't think there has been demonstrated any jumpy movement.
 

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Randomness and quantum mechanics
« Reply #54 on: 02/11/2009 11:14:06 »

 

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