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Author Topic: Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab  (Read 3844 times)

Offline L_D

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« on: 19/07/2009 05:49:36 »
A lot of people are starting to question this now...

Approximately 5 years ago scientists suceeded in resurrecting the most deadly virus man has ever had, the 1918 spainsh flu, the scientists found that the H surface protein was what made the flu so deadly.

So now we have the "swine flu" which is an unusually complex flu (frankenstein) with viruses from asia, europe and north america, it is made up of 2 parts swine, part bird, and part human.

This current swine flu also seems to have the all important reconstructed 1918 H causing uncanny similarities between the 1918 spanish flu and modern swine flu, these similarities include getting deeper into the lungs than mormal seasonal flu and having a propensity for killing young and healthy people.

But the most telling clue that the 1918 H has been released from the lab is that the immune system of people born before 1918 still recognises it and still produce antibodies for it. Anyone born after 1918 does not produce antibodies because their immune system has never seen the 1918 H before.

Quote
The Wisconsin researchers also said the H1N1 swine flu virus seems to be closely related to the viruses responsible for the deadly 1918-1919 Spanish flu pandemic, a finding that has been reported before. Antibodies taken from patients born before 1920 can recognize the H1N1 swine flu virus, but not so for people born after 1920, the scientists said.

http://health.msn.com/health-topics/cold-and-flu/articlepage.aspx?cp-documentid=100241823 [nofollow]



Here is selected quotes from a 2004 NewScientist article which is quite prophetic.

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...The 1918 H even made a virus that normally kills mice even more lethal. In every case, the 1918 hybrid replicated more, invaded the deeper tissues of the mouse lungs, and caused nastier lesions....

.... Kawaoka's team found that, while people who experienced the 1918 flu have antibodies that neutralise the reconstructed 1918 H, people immune to currently-circulating flu viruses - even of the same family as the 1918 strain - have almost no protection....

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn6502-virulent-1918-flu-genes-resurrected.html [nofollow]


So a few years after they reconstruct mans most deadly virus in the lab we have a very similar outbreak in society, surprise surprise.



 

Offline Bored chemist

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« Reply #1 on: 19/07/2009 10:35:48 »
A few points.
The outbreak started in Mexico. The labs concerned are not in Mexico.
Unless you are postulating that the virus has invented a teleport system your idea is impossible.

I'm sure that I have read that the genetic makeup of the two strains of virus (1918 and 2009)are known and they are different.

Stop trying to start silly conspiracy theories.
 

Offline LeeE

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« Reply #2 on: 19/07/2009 11:25:17 »
I wouldn't have described Spanish Flu as 'most deadly virus man has ever had'.  While it certainly killed many people, because many people were infected, its direct mortality rate is estimated to have only been between 10-20%.  Some of the Ebolavirus strains, such as the Zare virus, have had direct mortality rates of up to 90%; it's lowest mortality rate, in a 1994 outbreak, was still 59%.

Alternatively, Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), leading to Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), could be regarded as having an indirect mortality rate of > 99%.  HIV/AIDS is reckoned to have killed 25 million people so far, compared with an estimated 50-100 million for the Spanish Flu pandemic.  However, projected HIV infections are set to exceed 100 million.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« Reply #3 on: 19/07/2009 14:43:35 »
Oh, yes, that's another point. The old version killed a lot of people; the new one seems to have a mortality rate of about 0.1%
They are clearly not the same thing.
 

Offline L_D

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« Reply #4 on: 19/07/2009 14:59:45 »
A few points.
The outbreak started in Mexico. The labs concerned are not in Mexico.
Unless you are postulating that the virus has invented a teleport system your idea is impossible.

I'm sure that I have read that the genetic makeup of the two strains of virus (1918 and 2009)are known and they are different.

Stop trying to start silly conspiracy theories.

Some contaminated material may have been accidently sent to a lab in Mexico, or it may even have been deliberately released.

It is the make-up of the H surface protein that is the link to the 1918 Spanish flu, this is what made the 1918 flu so deadly and also what produces the worst features of this current flu.

The fact that people who were around for the 1918 flu still recognise it and produce antibodies for it is a good indication that it is of the same make-up.

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I wouldn't have described Spanish Flu as 'most deadly virus man has ever had'.

You are correct about the mortality rate not being the highest, but it has still has the unenviable record of killing more people than any other virus.

Quote
Oh, yes, that's another point. The old version killed a lot of people; the new one seems to have a mortality rate of about 0.1%
They are clearly not the same thing.

The Spanish flu started off mildish as well, and there may also be other reasons that make it less deadly now such as better healthcare systems and familiarity with other viruses of the same family.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« Reply #5 on: 19/07/2009 18:49:01 »
"The Spanish flu started off mildish as well, and there may also be other reasons that make it less deadly now such as better healthcare systems and familiarity with other viruses of the same family."
 
Or maybe it's just not the same virus.
 

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Swine flu = Spanish flu from lab
« Reply #5 on: 19/07/2009 18:49:01 »

 

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