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Author Topic: What colour is paint before the colour is added?  (Read 3655 times)

Offline callingtotheoutside

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What colour is paint before the colour is added?
« on: 26/07/2009 10:58:21 »
I was just wondering if during production paint is white and they add different colours once its finished, or if to get white paint you have to add the white, it could start a yucky brown or something for all i know?


 

Offline lightarrow

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What colour is paint before the colour is added?
« Reply #1 on: 26/07/2009 11:56:46 »
I was just wondering if during production paint is white and they add different colours once its finished, or if to get white paint you have to add the white, it could start a yucky brown or something for all i know?
Your question is not very clear to me: you want to know how white is made or how are made the others colours? Anyway, to make the others colours they don't start from white, they start from the specific colour, unless you want the clear version of that colour; to get rose, for example, you add white to the (pure) red.
 

Offline diogenesNY

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What colour is paint before the colour is added?
« Reply #2 on: 02/08/2009 23:20:05 »
I was just wondering if during production paint is white and they add different colours once its finished, or if to get white paint you have to add the white, it could start a yucky brown or something for all i know?

Most sorts of paint can be described as a mixture of two basic elements:  The pigment (the stuff that gives the paint the color) and the base (the main 'bulk' of the paint that forms the substrate or structural suspention vehicle for the color/pigment).

Wall/house paint, at least latex based paints, are usually made out of a base and a tint or pigment.  While you can still buy pre tinted, pre mixed paints at the store, if you go into Home Depot, Lowes, or wherever, other than a few common colors (Blacks, whites and a few others notwithstanding specialty paints), most latex wall paint is now sold as a two part mixture:  The 'Tint base' and the tint/pigment.  there are usually cans of variously colored pigments that can be mixed by computer directed proportions to yield a nominally infinite array of custom colors.  The tint/pigment is in turn mixed with the larger  can of base to provide the ready-to-use paint of a given color.  Specifically to your question, the 'tint base' is essentially the uncolored paint, and there is usually a range of cans labeled 'tint base 1', 'tint base 2', 'tint base 3', etc... Their exact composition and properties depending on your final desired color..... they vary somewhat, but they all pretty much look like a weak off white (IIRC).  'White' paint is a base with a bright white pigment, probobly titanium dioxide, added.

If you want to get into the same question for artists paints, the answers are somewhat different.

For acrylic paints, the paint is a mix of finely ground pigment with acrylic medium or gel (it is a water disolved monomer that becomes a stable bound and non-soluble polymer as the water dries from the medium... a one way chemical reaction).  Unpigmented gel has uses of its own including providing a clear sealing layer to a painting and also can be mixed with pigments supplied by the artist to make custom, home made paint.  In wet, unapplied form, the gel/medium is translucent and cloudy.  It dries and afterwards remains clear.... although yellowing can result with age.

Oil paints are exactly that:  Oil with pigment mixed in.  The oils include Linseed, Walnut, poppy seed, and many others... all with their own atributes and characteristics.  Appearance is typically mostly clear to pale to medium yelllow... mostly clear but sometimes a bit cloudy.

Walter color paint without pigment would look like a granular whitish powder (Dry gum arabic and sugar).  Alternately it could be a whitish block or a cloudy paste.

There are still other kinds of paint that have their own distinct qualities and appearances when formulated 'without pigment'.

I may have kindof overkilled the question, but the materials aspect of art is something I am kindof interested in.   :)

diogenesNY
« Last Edit: 03/08/2009 01:32:37 by diogenesNY »
 

Offline callingtotheoutside

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What colour is paint before the colour is added?
« Reply #3 on: 08/08/2009 20:03:48 »
What can i say diogenesNY but wow, thank you vey much, you answered my question and some  ;)
 

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What colour is paint before the colour is added?
« Reply #3 on: 08/08/2009 20:03:48 »

 

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