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Author Topic: Could moth larvae invade my body?  (Read 47713 times)

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #25 on: 05/08/2009 19:57:34 »
"Would the area directly above the anal sphincter muscle contain a methane environment?"
It certainly would while you were farting. Strictly not just methane but nitrogen, methane, hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide, and a few other odds and ends but very little oxygen.
 

Offline modern

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Re: Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #26 on: 06/08/2009 00:52:53 »
"It certainly would while you were farting. Strictly not just methane but nitrogen, methane, hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide, and a few other odds and ends but very little oxygen."

Not enough oxygen to sustain the life of a tinea larva?
 

Offline John Chapman

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Re: Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #27 on: 06/08/2009 09:47:27 »
Hi Modern

I'll be honest that, to me, the idea that a textile eating moth caterpillar should

a) attempt to enter your body
b) succeed in doing so
c) survive long enough to harm you, and
d) be able to harm you

is just ridiculous. Please do not think that, because the members of this forum are discussing it with you, that this gives the idea validity. I believe the members of this forum are simply humouring your fear because it is obviously sincere. But it is absolutely absurd. It's a bit like believing that my cat might somehow find his way into outer space and end up putting the first paw prints on the moon.

I'm sorry to be so blunt and I hope you don't take offense but this reminds me of some of the things my father, and later sister-in-law, believed when they each had nervous breakdowns. Now I'm not suggesting for one moment that you are suffering from mental illness but the point I am making is this: I learned that, although you can try until you are blue in the face, it is not possible to 'logic your way out' of irrational fears. That is the nature of them being irrational, I suppose. I have a feeling that there isn't anything I can say that will allay your fears.

If this is something that is worrying you to the extent that it is impacting negatively on your life then you may need professional help with this. Is it, for instance, stopping you from going to bed or sleeping or causing you to abuse laxatives or perform any other dangerous consequential actions?. Marriages can be broken up and jobs lost over these sorts of things. If this describes your situation then maybe counselling or hypnosis or some such thing might help.


I am quite worried that I am thinking about seeing the GP, but really too embarrassed to do so.  Afterall, what would a GP say to me, do you think? 


I think your GP may take this very seriously, not because he will be concerned that you have caterpillars living within you but because of the impact this may be having on your life.  If it is affecting your quality of life then you should tell him. After all, what harm could it do?
 
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #28 on: 06/08/2009 18:51:17 »
"It certainly would while you were farting. Strictly not just methane but nitrogen, methane, hydrogen sulphide, carbon dioxide, and a few other odds and ends but very little oxygen."

Not enough oxygen to sustain the life of a tinea larva?
No, and probably enough H2S to poison it anyway.

I'm beginning to get the feeling that if I were able to say (with evidence and authority)   
 " don't worry; that sort of moth larva has an alergy to human hair and wouldn't go near you if it could help it" you would just find something else to wory about.
I think you need to talk to a doctor about this; not about the larvae but about your fear of them.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #29 on: 06/08/2009 20:44:12 »
At the risk of stating the obvious, street drugs & prescribed drugs can cause temporary delusions, (including their sudden withdrawal) ... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delusional_disorder

At the risk of stating the obvious, again, an obsession about infection via anal penetration does sound like it could have a sexual origin.

You may prefer to see a psychiatrist privately if your GP does not take this seriously, or if you would prefer to avoid the possibility of stigmatization occurring as a result of having a mental health problem on your public health (NHS ?) medical record.

Quote
Q. How can I see a psychiatrist privately?

Your GP may hold a list of psychiatrists who practice privately. Alternatively, you can contact private healthcare providers or psychiatric clinics directly to make an appointment. Some psychiatrists may advertise themselves in your local yellow pages. If they have the title 'MRCPsych' (Member of the Royal College of Psychiatrists) or FRCPsych (Fellow of the Royal College of Psychiatrists), this means that they are current members of the College.
http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/mentalhealthinfo/treatments/howtogethelp.aspx#seepsychpriv
« Last Edit: 06/08/2009 20:53:54 by RD »
 

Offline modern

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #30 on: 07/08/2009 18:37:26 »
'Bottom' line - would anyone here be worried about finding any of these in their bed?
 

Offline John Chapman

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #31 on: 07/08/2009 19:35:33 »
No.

Well, I wouldn't exactly cherish the idea of any wildlife in my bed, unless we're talking about a female gymnast, wild with passion and armed with a jar of lemon curd. But if I found clothes moths living on my bedding my concern wouldn't extend further than changing the bedclothes. Possibly the following day if it was late.

Is your fear stopping you from going to bed?
 

Offline modern

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #32 on: 07/08/2009 21:16:30 »
Ha-ha - no John, they are long gone. 

I thank you personally for putting my mind at ease.  I may mention it, next time I see the GP just because hey it's a doctor telling me not to worry - which is always nice.  Not that I doubt your explanations.  What field are you in?  You are an intelligent man and a gentleman!
 

Offline John Chapman

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #33 on: 08/08/2009 08:48:09 »
Thank you. That's very generous.

Unfortunately, my paper qualifications are not very impressive. I studied biology, human biology and zoology but only to A Level. I failed to get into medical school and did a year of anatomy in the hope that it might persuade them to let me in. My interest in natural history and entomology was once keen but strictly amateur. That was all many years ago and I now run a small packing business with my wife, do contract delivery work on the side and also make biodiesel.

This site gives you access to some highly educated people and some of the other contributors to this thread are the real thing. Fortunately everyone was in agreement that while your problem was unpleasant it was not harmful and I am really pleased you feel reassured.

Please let us know if there are any more developments. In the meantime it would be lovely to see you on other threads.
 
 

Offline carreerslut

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #34 on: 17/08/2009 09:50:35 »
Modern!  Scrolled through all this and enough okay honey.  This IS an irrational worry, possibly because you are worried about something else that you don't want to talk about.  Just a thought.
We have not always slept on beds.  Most of us have been camping.  We've all been babies with our botties roaming free.  NEVER has ANYONE had a moth larvae do what you suggest, for all the reasons given. 

Certain parasites like tapeworms specifically evolved to live in the hostile environment of the inside body.  Moths like to fly.  They need an environment which is suitable for them.

If heart problems are worrying you.  I'm worried for you.  With all this anxiety over what is as you I think know yourself nonsense you will increase your chance of develping cardiac problems.  Worry about that?  Or do a bit of soul searching and find what is really bothering you.  I can guarantee it is not the eggs on your bed.  Had you not found them, I think you would be obsessing over something else.

Rarely get so harsh, but with so many answers and you just looking for more...have come across this before.  I think personally it is time to stop reassuring you.  If you want to believe this even will happen then that is your choice.  Just get annoyed when all of us with our own problems are trying to help and it is falling on deaf ears.

Yes I am in a foul mood.  But just felt this needed to be said.  Not a dig at you.  I think you do have problems, just not with moth larvae.  How about posting again with the real problem behind this sometime?  You have seen for yourself there is plenty of support here.
 

Offline modern

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #35 on: 17/08/2009 18:33:02 »
Thanks for your concern, but as you can read from my previous post, John has done well to convince and reassure that this is impossible.

Sorry that there isn't an ulterior motive for me to give to you...
 

Offline modern

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #36 on: 14/09/2009 10:41:10 »
Did anyone see Derren Brown's tv show on Saturday?  He claimed that a mice could survive in the intestine for up to 2 days.  He's having a laugh right?!  Not that I have any mice running in my bed!

By the way is the rectum a oxygen free environment?
 

Offline Nizzle

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #37 on: 14/09/2009 14:46:43 »
the rectum isn't, it's too close to the outside world.
The intestine is anaerobic, and IF some oxygen gas would be released from digestion, it would be used immediately by lactobacilli to aid their own metabolism.
Your intestine is inhabited by millions and millions of bacteria, of which there are anaerobic species (cannot live where there's oxygen) and facultative anaerobic species (can live in both oxygen and oxygen-free environments, but prefer oxygen). Since oxygen is a more efficient way of metabolising, these facultative anaerobes will use up oxygen first, before returning to anaerobe metabolism (and in this way, they also protect the 100% anaerobe bacteria)
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #38 on: 14/09/2009 20:31:15 »
"He's having a laugh right?!"
Yes, he was joking.
 

Offline RD

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #39 on: 14/09/2009 20:59:10 »
Yes, he was joking.

His explanation for his lottery "prediction" was also a joke ... http://uk.tv.yahoo.com/12092009/19/illusionist-brown-lottery-trick.html
« Last Edit: 14/09/2009 21:01:34 by RD »
 

Offline modern

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #40 on: 15/09/2009 07:23:57 »
the rectum isn't, it's too close to the outside world.
The intestine is anaerobic, and IF some oxygen gas would be released from digestion, it would be used immediately by lactobacilli to aid their own metabolism.
Your intestine is inhabited by millions and millions of bacteria, of which there are anaerobic species (cannot live where there's oxygen) and facultative anaerobic species (can live in both oxygen and oxygen-free environments, but prefer oxygen). Since oxygen is a more efficient way of metabolising, these facultative anaerobes will use up oxygen first, before returning to anaerobe metabolism (and in this way, they also protect the 100% anaerobe bacteria)

Wouldn't the closed sphincter block any air from getting to the rectum though?

Also do you think that sweat could lubricate the sphincter muscle enough to allow a Caterpillar larva to push through?
« Last Edit: 15/09/2009 07:26:24 by modern »
 

Offline Nizzle

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #41 on: 15/09/2009 08:54:29 »
The sphincter is hardly airtight (unless you train it alot ;)).
Sweat isn't lube, and since sweat is salty, I don't think a soft bodied larva likes it that much..
 

Offline Variola

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #42 on: 15/09/2009 09:36:19 »
Wonders how we got to talking about anal lubrication on a science forum... :o
 

Offline Nizzle

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #43 on: 15/09/2009 09:53:26 »
It was a difficult road to walk, but we finally made it! :P
 

Offline Variola

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #44 on: 15/09/2009 10:07:05 »
It would be difficult to walk if you hadn't used....... er... I'll leave that one!  ;)
 

Offline Nizzle

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #45 on: 15/09/2009 10:45:09 »
used what? shoes? :P
 

Offline modern

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #46 on: 15/09/2009 10:49:16 »
Would you say that pain would be felt if a moth larva were to eat into the rectum?
 

Offline Nizzle

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #47 on: 15/09/2009 10:58:00 »
I'd definitely say yes.
Best way to deal with this situation is to take a huge dump.
Tidal wave sh*t stream is a known method for getting rid of rectum biting moth larvae
 

Offline Pwee

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #48 on: 16/09/2009 17:02:27 »
A Haemorrhoid can cause itching, tingling in the rectum, sometimes pain, discomfort.
If it is just an inner Haemorrhoid, it can be mistaken with the feeling of a moth larva climbing in you rectum...

I'm personally more afraid of Thor's lightninghammer (Mjllnir) striking  me to death on a bright day then a clothing moth larva. Btw it has roughly the same chance that either of them are found in the rectum without deliberate human action.

(I just had a Dj vu)
 

Offline glovesforfoxes

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #49 on: 16/09/2009 18:38:25 »
offtopic:

Quote from: John Chapman
a female gymnast, wild with passion and armed with a jar of lemon curd

did no one else notice this? very lol :P

thumbs up for the weird food choice.
 

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Could moth larvae invade my body?
« Reply #49 on: 16/09/2009 18:38:25 »

 

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