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Author Topic: How do liquid fuelled rockets and solid liquid fuelled rockets differ?  (Read 4679 times)

Offline Naufal the B. S.

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What is the difference between liquid fueled rocket motors and solid liquid rocket motors?
« Last Edit: 01/08/2009 10:22:14 by chris »


 

Offline Chemistry4me

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The liquid propellants require some complicated piping and pumping equipment to feed their engines. They can provide greater propulsive thrust and throttle their power, but take time to build up this thrust when first ignited.
 

Offline Naufal the B. S.

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How to drive the pumps?
Please help me...
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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I think they use a gas turbine for the rocket engine to pump fuel and oxidizer into their combustion chamber.

------

It's going to look something like this


 

Offline Naufal the B. S.

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Did it driven by motor?
« Last Edit: 12/05/2011 10:28:37 by Naufal the B. S. »
 

Offline Chemistry4me

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No, I don't think they are.
A rocket engine is basically throwing mass in one direction and benefiting from the reaction that occurs in the other direction as a result.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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The pumps are probably driven by motors. They might be driven by a small engine running from the same fuel and oxidiser as the main rocket.
You can only do this with fairly big rockets otherwise the extra weight of the pumps and so on makes the thing too heavy to fly.
 

Offline Naufal the B. S.

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Please, help my city from disaster
« Reply #7 on: 01/08/2009 13:20:23 »
Why "rocketeer legend" (von braun, goddard, etc) didn't mix oxidizer and fuel directly like bp (kno3 + c)?
 

Offline Naufal the B. S.

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Please, help my city from disaster
« Reply #8 on: 01/08/2009 14:12:01 »
But rather, they used pump to mix oxidizer and fuel
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Offline Bored chemist

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the double post?
Anyway the answer is that if you mix the things they used as liquid fuel and oxidiser theygenerally  react and catch fire. Some of the things they used like liquid oxygen and alcohol can't be mixed because one of them needs to be kept very cold.

Even the ones where you can mix them without the reaction starting would give you a mixture that was almost certain to explode.
The point is that they cannot react until you mix them so up till that point they are relatively safe.
That means that you can use really dangerous "mixes" for liquid fueled rockets.
That means that you probaly shouldn't even try to copy them.
 

Offline Naufal the B. S.

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KNO3 can be found in toothpaste?j
« Reply #11 on: 02/08/2009 14:03:28 »
Why?
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Because you will probably kill yourself.
 

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