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Author Topic: When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?  (Read 12198 times)

Offline syhprum

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #25 on: 25/08/2009 08:47:51 »
Thirty years ago I used to work with analog computers on HELL DC300 scanner/recorders they used 30 circuit boards weighed about 50 Kg and consumed several hundred Watts.
They needed frequent adjustment and the 50 or potentiometers became jittery and had to be lubricated with WD40 (some were sealed and you had to carefully drill holes in them).
Present day machines use a few chips all set up via a terminal, a vast improvement.
 

Offline Geezer

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #26 on: 26/08/2009 01:22:12 »
Well, sure, didn't you feel as if you were driving something more like a steam locomotive than a mini? Bet it had a great aroma too. All that ozone and hot amplifiers.

The thing I miss most about tubes/valves is the hot aroma they gave off. Maybe I could make a product that makes PC's smell as itf they are running on tubes? Probably get shut down for health reasons in a couple of days!
 

Offline nicephotog

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #27 on: 28/08/2009 02:24:49 »
Quote
Decisions (which are so frequently talked about in yes/no terms) in life and when presented to a computer are very seldom binary

All very well to simply see boolean and 1 or 0(a bit), but the true underlying rationale of making computers is data and data handling through instruction circuits.
Truth tables have individual circuit instruction paths and patterns of data shunting sequence for each version of its operators themselves.

Its not actually booleans, thats only one small piece.

The true governor is the byte , or how to encode both data and instructions inside anything from 0-255(8 bits) or more until reaching 64 bit Alpha CPU counters.

1 and 0 in the binary system are really only convenient encoding.
Boolean is extremely important only because it helps make a clear choice in channeling to the next set of instructions to start at on the stack.
 

Offline LeeE

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #28 on: 28/08/2009 02:40:56 »
I'm afraid that made as much sense to me as a random sentence generator I once wrote, which used a large database of word-triplets and their corresponding usage statistics to string sentences together.

I was actually quite pleased with the results.

Oh what the heck - here are a few examples...

Quote
Subjects of photographs are often considered to be about three miles distant, from whence several of the most famous of these were built to promote development, even if not apparently viable in strictly financial terms.

Quote
According to the first governor of the 20th century, the lines between major cities were converted to standard gauge line was built in the same way.

Quote
After a tearless and comical funeral service, where he is always a bit of American and Canadian slang refers to statistical or econometric analysis of numeric data.
« Last Edit: 28/08/2009 03:03:59 by LeeE »
 

Offline nicephotog

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #29 on: 28/08/2009 02:55:34 »
Alright then, for a computer to be affected by the state of one or zero the filter circuit needs to detect which it is(1 or 0) before it gets re-channelled for whatever its using that bit for what it does with it.

Becuase the number of instruction circuits(or re-channelling operation sequences) are finite, and because more accurate magnetic disc signal storage is possible, discs and CPU's could read signals and stored data(instructional or pure data) using some other base(e.g. see Chinese language symbols for numerics, has an individual character up to around 600 or more before it has to do representation rules for bigger numbers) well above base 2 logic, inclusively making some pure data have symbolisis representation inside that base not simply control the CPU sequences of use of the instruction circuits.
e.g. 1 oscillation beat to send a signal for a 0 and requires 8 beats in binary to read that stack number for its corresponding circuit.

Now 1 oscillation beat to represent a specific signal frequency for the CPU recognition filter and and only one beat used.
Best i get it down to physically in my mind is the disk being able measure the lay-down length of the written magnetic section or be extremely sensitive to the level of the stored magnetic charge that was layed down on the disc so it can recognise the level of the charge.
RAM much the same sort of thing.

unoff-sig: http://www.wild-canidae-conservation-forum.netne.net/index.php
« Last Edit: 30/08/2009 15:55:16 by nicephotog »
 

Offline syhprum

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #30 on: 31/08/2009 20:22:17 »
If you had ever maintained machines with analog computers you would have been real happy when digital came in.
 

Offline Geezer

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #31 on: 31/08/2009 20:37:04 »
If you had ever maintained machines with analog computers you would have been real happy when digital came in.

LOL! I know what you mean. The first digital machine I worked on was bad enough. It was originally designed to be built with valves (er tubes?), but germanium transistors suddenly became affordable, so they made it "solid state" instead. It was a pain. It would blow transistors on power up at an alarming rate. My job was to track them down and replace them. Mind you, it taught me a lot about computers - I had no choice!
 

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When are we gonna crawl out of the binary era?
« Reply #31 on: 31/08/2009 20:37:04 »

 

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