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Author Topic: Why is most land north of the equator ?  (Read 5789 times)

neilep

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Why is most land north of the equator ?
« on: 23/08/2005 20:01:48 »
Dearest Land knowing people !

Why is the majority of the land north of the equator ?...I just pondered whilst looking at my globe...which is nice !

Thanks



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daveshorts

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #1 on: 23/08/2005 22:47:55 »
I don't think there really has to be a reason, the continents move around quite a lot over geological time at some points there must be more continets in one hemisphere than the other...

It is conceivable that there is some climatalogical reason why intelligent life is more likely to develop when there are significantly more continents in one hemisphere than the other... but i think it is more likely just fluke.

neilep

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #2 on: 24/08/2005 14:56:16 »
Thanks Dave.....just happenstance it is then !!...I just figured looking at my globe that there may well be a more fundamental reason.......I know over the aeons that the plates have moved, but I thought that there may be an underlying condition that has made them move in that particular way.

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sharkeyandgeorge

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #3 on: 28/08/2005 19:22:01 »
i wonder if the tilt of the earth has any thing to do with it perhaps some sort of centrifical bias that encourages the heavier solids of the land masses to migrate north possible?

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Simmer

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #4 on: 28/08/2005 22:02:54 »
I think all the land end up on the equator in that case, the tilt doesn't affect the axis of rotation wrt the Earth.  

Or did you mean solar tidal effects? I hope not, you get all kinds of complicated stuff like precession, perihelions (sp?) and worse :-(

Ray hinton

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #5 on: 02/02/2006 01:27:44 »
I think its just a case of all that land mass wanting to be close to our wonderful country,so it moved here.

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another_someone

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #6 on: 02/02/2006 01:41:54 »
quote:
Originally posted by daveshorts

It is conceivable that there is some climatalogical reason why intelligent life is more likely to develop when there are significantly more continents in one hemisphere than the other... but i think it is more likely just fluke.



Having an isolated land mass sitting atop Antarctica, surrounded by a lot of water, does help keep the Earth unusually cool.  For much of its history, the Earth has been much warmer than it is now.  Whether intelligent life could have developed in a warmer climate is something we can only speculate upon (certainly, all those doom mongers who claim that global warming will kill us all will probably suggest we cannot survive in anything warmer than we have today).

Since an isolated Antarctica requires that there be a lot of ocean surrounding it, it follows that one would expect less land overall in the southern hemisphere.

rammar

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #7 on: 04/11/2012 19:29:13 »
i wonder if the tilt of the earth has any thing to do with it perhaps some sort of centrifical bias that encourages the heavier solids of the land masses to migrate north possible?

Giggidy Giggidy Goo
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I had an idea recently that would be related to this. When it is winter in the northern hemisphere the Earth is at it's closest to the Sun. 'Why is it not hotter then?' I hear you cry! Well, because the Earth's tilt means the large water mass of the southern hemisphere is reflecting most of the heat back into space. My idea was that the Sun may have a slightly greater gravitational effect on the water mass during this period of the year, pulling the waters into the southern hemisphere and forcing the land mass away into the northern hemisphere.


Bill S

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #8 on: 07/11/2012 23:59:54 »
Hi, rammar, welcome.

Quote
My idea was that the Sun may have a slightly greater gravitational effect on the water mass during this period of the year, pulling the waters into the southern hemisphere and forcing the land mass away into the northern hemisphere.

I think there is no way that a bit of extra tidal bulge in the southern oceans would cause a northward migration of the continents.  You are probably aware that the continents move becaust the tectonic plates on which they sit are moving; so the causes are much more deep-seated than oceanic tidal variations.

evan_au

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Re: Why is most land north of the equator ?
« Reply #9 on: 10/11/2012 10:13:12 »
Geologists think that nearly all the land mass was on one hemisphere on around 6 occasions in the past: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supercontinent#History

However, it's not clear whether this was a north/south hemisphere or an East/West hemisphere...

The same article speculates that the spread of the Atlantic ocean will reverse, bringing Europe, Africa & the Americas together again... (but don't hold your breath!) 

 

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