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Author Topic: Why Does It Feel Colder Being In Water That Is The Same Temp As Air ?  (Read 17809 times)

Offline Geezer

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Wet wool also has insulating properties → http://adventure.howstuffworks.com/wool-when-wet1.htm.

Well, if you say so. I seem to remember that my first bathing suit was made of wool, but I don't remember being too warm and it seemed to me that it had every intention of drowning me because of the vast amount of water it retained.
 

lyner

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Mine was wool, too. When you came out of the water, it could end up round your ankles, it was so full of water.
 

Offline Geezer

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Oh! Yes, I remember that too.  [:I]

If you tried to sell woolen swimming trunks today they'd likely be banned for health and safety reasons  :D
 

lyner

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And on the grounds of public decency.
 

Offline Lynda

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The conductivity of water could explain why we tend to feel cold when arriving indoors after walking in the rain without adequate waterproof clothing.

A few evenings ago I arrived home after a meeting about a mile away.  As I had to walk home, even if I had my umbrella, some of my clothes were a bit damp upon arrival at home. As I was shattered I flopped onto the settee as soon as I arrived home.    I soon felt cold even though the room temperature was 23 deg C - which is normally a good temperature for me.

Eventually I changed into dry clothes and warmed up.
 

lyner

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Evaporation is a real factor with wet clothes.  It requires 2,200 kJ of energy  to keep warm and to evaporate 1kg of water. That would be an awful lot of your daily food intake. You could easily have a quarter of that in really wet clothes.
You could sit outside with wet clothes eating chocolate all day (????) - not quite.
 

Offline CZARCAR

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static layer of air on the skin actually insulates against heatloss?
 

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