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Author Topic: What happens to the content of tumors after they have been destroyed by chemo?  (Read 3872 times)

Offline coquina.rocks

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My grandson is 18, just graduated from high school in June and moved to South Dakota to live with his mother and stepfather to attend college there. He has always been very health conscious - works out regularly and eats healthy. (He eats milk products eggs and seafood, but has never eaten meat.) A few days after he got out there, he got gastroenteritis and my daughter took him to the ER.  They noticed that his neck was swollen and when they xrayed him found him to have a tumor that is wrapped around his carotid artery and jugular vein - he has another quite large one in his chest that is around his aortic arch and heart, and a third smaller one just starting on the other side of his neck.  The dx is Hodgkins Lymphoma, Stage 3 (I still can't believe it.) He will not have surgery on the tumors, but will have chemotherapy every two to three weeks until January, followed by six weeks of daily radiation treatment.

Since he will not have surgery to remove the tumors, what happens to the tissue they contain after they have been killed by the treatments?  I picture this big rotting mass in his chest the size of a brick and wonder how the body is able to rid itself of this without causing a massive infection?

It goes without saying that I am worried sick, regardless that Hodgkins has a high cure rate...


 

Offline RD

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Autolytic cell destruction is uncommon in adult organisms and usually occurs in injured cells or dying tissue. Autolysis is initiated by the cells' lysosomes releasing the digestive enzymes they contain out into the cytoplasm. The cell then, in effect, starts to digest itself.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autolysis

Quote
In cell biology, autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a catabolic process involving the degradation of a cell's own components through the lysosomal machinery. It is a tightly-regulated process that plays a normal part in cell growth, development, and homeostasis, helping to maintain a balance between the synthesis, degradation, and subsequent recycling of cellular products.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autophagy_%28cellular%29

Some debate as to whether Hogkins lymphoma is genetic or caused by virus ...
http://resources.metapress.com/pdf-preview.axd?code=jva37vxp8tp9b7f8&size=largest
« Last Edit: 05/09/2009 12:36:05 by RD »
 

Offline coquina.rocks

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Autolytic cell destruction is uncommon in adult organisms and usually occurs in injured cells or dying tissue. Autolysis is initiated by the cells' lysosomes releasing the digestive enzymes they contain out into the cytoplasm. The cell then, in effect, starts to digest itself.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autolysis [nofollow]

Quote
In cell biology, autophagy, or autophagocytosis, is a catabolic process involving the degradation of a cell's own components through the lysosomal machinery. It is a tightly-regulated process that plays a normal part in cell growth, development, and homeostasis, helping to maintain a balance between the synthesis, degradation, and subsequent recycling of cellular products.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autophagy_%28cellular%29 [nofollow]

Some debate as to whether Hogkins lymphoma is genetic or caused by virus ...
http://resources.metapress.com/pdf-preview.axd?code=jva37vxp8tp9b7f8&size=largest [nofollow]

Thank you very much - I didn't know the term for which I needed to search. As far as the heritary aspect, I don't know of any Hodgkins in my family for 3 generations, but I don't know anything about my ex-husband's family, because he was adopted.

If there is a cautionary tale here, it is to take your child for an annual physical.  My grandson saw pediatric docs when he was younger, but was apparantly healthy and asymptomatic in his high school years and had not seen a doc for 3 or 4 years.  By the time it was found, the tumor in his chest was approximately the size of a brick - we don't know how long it's been growing, but more than a year, in all probability.
 

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