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Offline Mr. Scientist

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« on: 15/09/2009 12:45:00 »
Choice, Time and the Wave Function


There is no beginning without an end;

Time seems to pass us in moments. These ''momentous fleeting flashes'' of our existences seem to define the path of life itself, where it was, where it is
now, and where it may be going. And as much as it defined these paths, as much as it inexorably defines life, it also defines it's death.

As morbid as this might seem, we hardly ever stop to wonder about this nature of the universe. Perhaps it is because we are worried that time will bring upon
to us all its inevitable outcomes, our inescapable deaths. We never hardly ever stop to imagine these things, its such a rare occurance that one might.

In a nutshell, the very nature of time itself is why anything may ever happen, even the paths that we may invaluably choose to take in this world... But do
we have that choice? Is the proverbial path in time our own making?

The antipathy of our choices may itself be conditioned to time as well, and that our paths have already been destined before us, in both histories past and
future. But what if we had knowledge of the future? What if we can stop, and take note of these fleeting flashes of moments that seem to rush by us, so that
we may even see what path lay before us, and the jagged crooked path that had once lay before us?

It happened almost 15 billion years ago. A sudden explosion, spontaneous appearance of matter and gas. But it's most primal form was time, and we often
believe that time is very much a primal and evident to physical transactions as much as space can allow the human body to displace from one point to another.

Does the universe care if we can understand our paths, see those choices that once lay before us and those which ultimately lead to our entire destruction?
If we could harvest the moments by simply stopping to make note of time, can we change or even alter what it destined?

It seems even now with a rising population of around 6 billion people on planet Earth, not one of us have performed this miraculous trick, nor have we been
able to see past the maya of time... Is this because we cannot read our future by simply choosing to think and take note of the moments which pass us by,
or is the illusion sympathetically down to our innabilities to understand such events, made within our own choices?

The Ticking of Time

What is time in the eyes of physics? Apart from the clocks on the wall and the watch around your wrist, time has a very interesting description by
physicists. The strange thing about time, is that you cannot see it, touch it, or feel it. We can sense it to some degree - but there is a reason why we
sense time; that is because it all exists inside of us. The clock of the universe, is simultaneously and paradoxically a mental clock; time is a product of
our minds.

When considering time, we ask questions like, 'what is time?' And other questions like, 'why can't we live forever?' And, 'can we make the hand of the clock
 move anti-clockwise?' Let's investigate these for a second. We often wonder why our skin ages. What causes my body to age...? Is it simply a process of
time?

Yes, and no. Obviously, it takes time to do it. However, scientists think they can locate the particle that causes ageing, the 'free radical' - a deteriate
molecule, eating electrons. However, there is no scientific technology as yet that can stop these free radicals from self-destructing. This is just a fact
about nature.

The whole world is governed by specific times, in a day or even in a year. The flower will close its petals over night, and re-open in the morning. The
trees in autumn will shed its leaves, and sheep in springtime give birth to their lambs. Even humans, females that is, have an 'in-built' maternal clock.
In fact, we have several clocks. One is our 'sleep clock.' It is around 24.5 hour sleep clock. Scientists have discovered the gene that causes this
perception, and called it the 'Suprachiasmatic Nucleus.'

Time is the 4th dimension of space, physicists call, 'the imaginary dimension of space.' Quantum physics points to a startling conclusion when regarding
time - and that is that the human mind is somehow, the same thing as it! It makes us inextricably linked with space, matter and energy. Somehow, through
the presence of time, everything is dependant on each other. It is our perceptions of time that interests scientists. Certain times of the day can go faster
 than other times. Even certain narcotics can play an influence on the human perception.

So can we slow down the molecular process of ageing?

Some scientists think that it is possible. The molecular structures of quantum systems can be tinkered with to alter their life spans. In the Buck Institute
 in Novato, California, they have been able to increase the lifespan of the Nematode Worm; This is by cataloging its individual genes, the thousands of them.
 A human being has about 80,000 genes. By locating certain genes inside of humans, we can alter disease, and, in the case of the Nematode - triple their
life spans. Given that humans have a considerable amount more cells than the 959-cell nematode worm, we have around 50,000 billion cells, and a great deal
more genes, about 60,100 more; can we alter human life expectancy in mapping and cataloging the human genetic makeup?

There is a tree is Bristlestone National Park, near Death Valley in Sunkist California that is 4785 years old [1]! It was given the most appropriate name of the
 'Methuselah,' named after the biblical character in Genesis, father of Lamech and oldest man to be recorded, as 969 years. Being as old as the pyramids them
selves, older than Christ, It has lasted this long because it has an amazingly slow metabolism.

Theoretically, a human can add an extra 5-10yrs onto their life spans by eating less (this ensures we don't use up too much energy - this is semi-starvation
 treatment, and they perform this on chimps), and exercise less (also to retain as much energy.) This of course happens because of a conservation of energy,
 by doing a lot less than the average human metabolism  and so will run much slower. Thus my cells use up less energy, then needing less energy.

The speed of time can fluctuate and change as moments pass around large cosmological dense bodies (even the earth produces time warps), but it cannot simply
 disappear from the fabric of space, because it is a universal 'invariant'. There are many 'invariant' relationships in physics. Invariance is a constant
that shall remain, therego, despite if something else changes. A good example is a tree. It will bud in spring, bloom in summer, but will shed its leaves in
autumn. Now in winter it is bare; the invariance here is the tree. So, it is no surprise that scientists are perplexed by the brains ability to warp time
senselessly - and in some extreme cases, even makes time disappear - it defies all scientific understanding.

For instance, the mind can experience time loss. Sometimes we can experience the speeding up of time and the slowing down of time whilst under the influence
 of drugs. Certain drugs, like cannabis have peculiar effects on the user, and he/she can sometimes experience a day go in the matter of hours and sometimes
 an hour can feel more like 'hours'. This interests scientists and they are now exploring into why this occurs. I have also raised this point in my essay: ''On
 the Pyschological Problem of Time''.

The Wave Function Governs Choice

Shown in a massive excerpt given as a footnote in the essay ''Exploring the Paradox of Time and Showing How It Must Be Purely Local'' we find that time is local.
In fact, i am going to redefine this. Locality can only be left to an observer. Soon, i will give some reasons to why i believe the wave function must not only
give rise to a collapse in consciousness itself [1], but how the wave of possibilities could be why we seem to beleive we have the ability to have choice.

Locality is Left to the Observer?

I personally cannot interpret the locality of phenomena down to anything other than ''something which experiences itself within its frame of reference.'' The
local nature of observers, whether that be particle or human seems to have all the local attributes at its demise. Funnily enough, those which are not
local end up related to the ''strange consequences'' of particle physics, namely the Bell's Inequality. The observation of this new effect in physics was in
fact the final nail in Einsteins coffin (academically-speaking) for his distrust in Quantum Mechanics. It showed that there really was not any inconsistencies
at all... but to avoid them, the universe chose somehow to have a non-local nature when it desired.

The essence of this chapter asks exactly, ''What is locality?''

The example given previously asked about the dual local and non-local nature of particles themselves. On one hand, we had a particle in a wavelike nature
that was purely non-local... but as soon as something ''disturbed'' that particle, it would be observed as a local particle. The local and non-local natures
are thus highlighted in this example.

The local nature of quantum mechanics, and maybe more appropriately of the universe itself, seems to be reserved quite well for the human observer. We
experience a plethora of examples in our own nature which are purely based upon local natures. We experience an ''asymptotic time'' (the time we all come
to experience) which fits the personal details of that observer, hence being local itself. So the experience of time is local (1). The worlds we observe also
exibits local natures, including all four other ''main'' senses of the human body. In fact, most, if not all senses of the conscious observer is purely local
to itself. The local nature of ''experience'' allows the human to have the proverbial ''I'' attached to their beings.

I have however so far talked about ''observation'' from the human being. It does also account for an atomic or even subatomic observation. Indeed, an atom
or even a group of atoms, not to mention the subatomic world can exhibit wave functions which are purely non-local in nature. But as soon as they ''observe''
another system, this ''cuts'' their non-locality down to size into a local phenomena of experience. 

The Wave Function Gives us the Possibilities

How can we have any choice in a predetermined universe? It seems completely contradictory, because if everything was predetermined, surely then we would not have
choice in anything because it has already been done? Is it an illusion?

In this universe, in fact, the entire quantum theory of the cosmology of the universe is governed purely by statistics. In fact - one can go as far to assert
that quantum mechanics is only a statistical theory at best, and nothing much more. This is because every system in the universe is governed by a wave of possibilities.
The probability of finding any one of these possible states are found as the square of the wave function, which is an amplitude process, and then you can use that for
whatever state you wish to desire to look for, such as a position, or an eigenstate. More importantly, we find that these eigenstates before any resolution has been
transpired, all exist in a ghostly superpositioning... but hey, what is superpositioning of a systems possible states all about?

Superpositioning is when (in this case) refers to a quantum object that has many possibilities all ''glued'' or added on all of its other possible
states. If you had a quantum object like an electron, it can have either a spin up and a spin down. Before any resolution on the quantum objects state says
that all of its probable states are in a mix, or rather, in a state of superpositioning. This means, that before a particle is observed, either by another
particle, or a strong electromagnetic field, or even by the human eye, it is said to be in a superposition of states: In other words, a particle like an
electron has both spin states before one is created from a collapse in the wave function.

Imagine now that we are a photon. Let's say we are moving towards a mirror at a 90 degree right angle. The fact of the matter is, is that we are actually given the choice
of all possible angles towards the mirror. In other words, the photon does not just move towards the mirror along one trajectory alone, but in fact all trajectories that are
possible! This is the strange world of quantum mechanics, but let's take a step back now, and focus on the choice of the human. Could the wave function govern our
own choices just like the many paths a photon could take as it moves through spacetime [3]?

To make my suggestion logically-varifiable, i once wrote something which can help us realize that perhaps consciousness itself cannot be outside such laws of the universe,
like quantum superpositioning:

''We tend to treat ourselves as being seperate to the great whole we call the universe. This line of thought must be illogical, since afterall, we inhabit bodies that are
made up of mostly space, and a small portion of matter and a massive gradient of energy. With this in mind, one might even say, 'If we are made up of the stuff of the universe
then we must somehow be the universe herself.' We are then emergent systems that are by definition part and parcel of the grand universe, which wanted to observe Herself in
all her beauty and arrays of wonder.''

Now, considering we are not seperate of this great whole, would mean that we must (consciousness in direct example) be subject to the laws of physics. The wave function
can easily be modelled to show that we have choices because they are ''superpositioned'' together, that is until we make a conscious choice to what our mind is pondering.
In effect, it would mean everytime we have a conscious thought the wave function collapses, and a decision in our consciousness, or a particular knowledge has now
became part of our experiences.

Let's call thought one A, and thought two B. What these thoughts are, are themselves irrelevent for this topic. All we need to know is that before these thoughts are manifested,
we have a choice. We can say that A is in a superpositioned state with B, so we can mathematically define the two states as:

A + B / sqrt{2}

This reads A is in a mixed state with B, and the square root in the denominator is required for renormalization. Let's say that both A and B contain just as likely probabilities
as each other (which makes this as simple as it can get), so we can define this wave function of possibilities as:

|\psi>=0.50i|A>+0.50|B>

So the absolute square of |psi|^2 will yield either condition A or condition B. Now i have just mathematically-proven that its possible to have two mixed states of thoughts, out
of which one of those thoughts or decisions can arise. In theory, i believe, consciousness acts in much the same mannorism. Our ability to choose is really just a matter of the
wave function giving our corporeally-built minds the ability to have more than one choice or decision making.

[1] - This is the last time i checked. It will be a couple of years older now.

[2] - The collapse-causes-conscious model is not a new theory i have proposed, but concerning the discussion is a theory in which i adopt, but do not usually follow as a true actual reason
collapse.

[3] - I hate to cause confusion, but a photon according to relativity doesn't even experience time because it's frame of time has been stretched into infinity, so not a second
by for it. And since relativity makes both space and time the same thing, this means that paradoxically-speaking, must include space as well, meaning it cannot really
be moving through space from its frame of reference. Only from our frames of reference can we define an actual movement and a passing of time for a photon of light. This
goes for all particles that move at lightspeed, such as the gluon, graviton (which is yet to be detected) to even a Higgs Boson. But there are many of these speedy
particles in the standard model of quantum mechanics.


 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #1 on: 18/09/2009 03:39:27 »
No one then?

Is no one to have an opinion on this?

Viktor
 

Offline Geezer

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #2 on: 18/09/2009 04:52:54 »
We're not very quick readers here. A precis might help.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #3 on: 18/09/2009 17:50:09 »
We're not very quick readers here. A precis might help.
Let's call thought one A, and thought two B. What these thoughts are, are themselves irrelevent for this topic. All we need to know is that before these thoughts are manifested,
we have a choice. We can say that A is in a superpositioned state with B, so we can mathematically define the two states as:

A + B / sqrt{2}

This reads A is in a mixed state with B, and the square root in the denominator is required for renormalization. Let's say that both A and B contain just as likely probabilities
as each other (which makes this as simple as it can get), so we can define this wave function of possibilities as:

|\psi>=0.50i|A>+0.50|B>

So the absolute square of |psi|^2 will yield either condition A or condition B. Now i have just mathematically-proven that its possible to have two mixed states of thoughts, out
of which one of those thoughts or decisions can arise. In theory, i believe, consciousness acts in much the same mannorism. Our ability to choose is really just a matter of the
wave function giving our corporeally-built minds the ability to have more than one choice or decision making.
 

Offline Geezer

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #4 on: 18/09/2009 18:48:30 »
We're not very quick readers here. A precis might help.
Let's call thought one A, and thought two B. What these thoughts are, are themselves irrelevent for this topic. All we need to know is that before these thoughts are manifested,
we have a choice. We can say that A is in a superpositioned state with B, so we can mathematically define the two states as:

A + B / sqrt{2}

This reads A is in a mixed state with B, and the square root in the denominator is required for renormalization. Let's say that both A and B contain just as likely probabilities
as each other (which makes this as simple as it can get), so we can define this wave function of possibilities as:

|\psi>=0.50i|A>+0.50|B>

So the absolute square of |psi|^2 will yield either condition A or condition B. Now i have just mathematically-proven that its possible to have two mixed states of thoughts, out
of which one of those thoughts or decisions can arise. In theory, i believe, consciousness acts in much the same mannorism. Our ability to choose is really just a matter of the
wave function giving our corporeally-built minds the ability to have more than one choice or decision making.

Thanks for the precis! I confess I'm none the wiser, but those with stronger math than I have may relate to it more.

Would it be possible to extrapolate your theory into something that might allow us to, say, predict the behavior of the stock market? I'm always interested in things that might lead to a fast honest buck.

BTW - there is a handy-dandy spell check thingy that you can hit before you post. I use it a lot. My spelling is lousey.
 

Offline JP

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #5 on: 18/09/2009 21:01:53 »
All that math describes is very basic quantum mechanics, where instead of "thought" you say "particle."  Also, there's a mistake since it should be 1/Sqrt[2] out front of the |A> and |B>, not 0.5.

This doesn't prove anything about the mind, which is going to be far far more complex than a single quantum mechanical particle.  There are philosophers who have thought about things like that, but I don't think there's any scientific proof that the mind works that way.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #6 on: 19/09/2009 01:30:22 »
A particle can be just as ethereal.

Tell me then what difference you have in mind.

And no... the math is not wrong considering you allow local and non-local event for particle and non-particle events which describe such [[events]]. I am very interested in your response for you seem to imply some kind of physical side to that of the wave function of the mind??
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #7 on: 19/09/2009 01:32:23 »
And by the way - no one should assume physics is easy... if anything, it's nothing but that. Despote abstract math, so you can jump off that high-horse as quickly as you had jumped on it.
 

Offline demografx

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« Reply #8 on: 21/09/2009 05:24:26 »

What is a despote?
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #9 on: 21/09/2009 07:26:30 »

French for:
despote =
 NM despot  (fig)= tyrant
 

Offline demografx

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« Reply #10 on: 21/09/2009 19:11:55 »
Karen-to-the-rescue! Thank you!

Now I understand, and it makes perfect sense now: "Tyrant abstract math..."

Karen, don't forget, there's always a "rant" in tyrant.

Wow, am I ever learned now!
« Last Edit: 21/09/2009 19:28:31 by demografx »
 

Offline demografx

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« Reply #11 on: 21/09/2009 19:17:18 »

And jpetruccelli, I commend you highly for uncovering the scientific principle known as smoke-and-mirrors!
« Last Edit: 21/09/2009 19:35:15 by demografx »
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Is choice down to the wave function?
« Reply #12 on: 22/09/2009 00:22:42 »
''Despite''

 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #13 on: 22/09/2009 01:10:34 »
Oh! That's it. I really could not figure it out.

Spell chwckers can be wundeful thnigs if we remebmer to use them.
 

Offline demografx

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« Reply #14 on: 22/09/2009 01:46:00 »

I adgree, Gfeezer!
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #15 on: 22/09/2009 02:51:00 »
Oh! That's it. I really could not figure it out.

Spell chwckers can be wundeful thnigs if we remebmer to use them.

So extremely sorry.

Beheading of me, is the only scenario now.
 

Offline demografx

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« Reply #16 on: 23/09/2009 02:08:27 »

Nah, just humility-infusion.
 

Offline Karen W.

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« Reply #17 on: 23/09/2009 08:04:12 »
Karen-to-the-rescue! Thank you!

Now I understand, and it makes perfect sense now: "Tyrant abstract math..."

Karen, don't forget, there's always a "rant" in tyrant.

Wow, am I ever learned now!

LOL..Well I was thoroughly confused!

Despite, is that what you meant Mr. Scientist?

Despite abstract math?
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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« Reply #18 on: 23/09/2009 23:16:16 »
Yes, i think so. I can't even remember now what i was talking about.
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #19 on: 29/09/2009 05:33:24 »
As a bookmaker statistician, I was very interested in the idea that you might be able to predict how people might make a selection.
 

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« Reply #20 on: 29/09/2009 10:30:46 »
Thanks.
 

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