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Author Topic: Why do some transition metals have variable oxidation numbers?  (Read 16217 times)

Offline pluvam

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I know that the answer lies in their electron configurations but what exactly?

For example Fe, Fe(+2) and Fe(+3)

And also how do i know which oxidation number is the most common for any transition metal?

Thanks for any help


 

Offline Chemistry4me

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The various oxidation states correspond to the involvement of the 4s and unpaired 3d electrons in transition metals. For example, Mn has 5 unpaired 3d electrons and two 4s electrons. It's highest oxidation state is +7 when it uses all seven of these electrons. Then there is Mn2+ which is +2 and it has lost the two 4s electrons. In between all theses you have, MnCl2 (+2), Mn2O3 (+3), MnO2 (+4), +5 can't think of one :-X, and MnO42- (+6). There is also +1 which is not very common. All of these have different numbers of electrons involved in bonding hence the different oxidation states.
 

Offline yor_on

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nice explanation.
Ah, just what is transition metal's?
 

Offline EvilFrog

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transition metals are the elements in between group 2 to group 3(i mean between the group that start with Be to the group that start with B). can i say like that? Is it an explanation?
« Last Edit: 23/10/2009 16:28:22 by EvilFrog »
 

Offline yor_on

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Possibly :)

But chemistry is a field if its own
 

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