The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Electricity from water - Kelvin water drop generator - Garage Science  (Read 14253 times)

Offline thedoc

  • Forum Admin
  • Administrator
  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 511
  • Thanked: 12 times
    • View Profile
This is a beautiful little demonstration dating back to to Lord Kelvin. Using a few cans wires and dripping water it is possible to generate thousands of volts in a beautifully elegant piece of physics.

 Read more about this experiment.


Garage science is a blog of science experiments you probably can't or shouldn't do at home


 
« Last Edit: 20/03/2013 18:07:36 by _system »


 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Shouldn't the top two containers be connected together too?
 

Offline rosy

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1018
  • Chemistry
    • View Profile
Yeah. And infact they are. Both are sitting (as far as I recall) on a sheet of aluminium which you might just be able to see looking at the set-up in the photo, forming the connection (the paint having been sanded off the bottom of the pots). You could equally use a single trough of water with two taps out of it. An extra wire ought to be drawn in...
 

Offline daveshorts

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2583
  • Physics, Experiments
    • View Profile
    • http://www.chaosscience.org.uk
You are of course right, I have now updated the diagrams
 

Mick

  • Guest
None
« Reply #4 on: 03/10/2009 12:44:17 »
"Electrons in the water are attracted by the positive ring, so the drops which are just forming in this ring become negative and then fall into the pot below. "
If the positive ring is attracting electrons from the water, shouldn't that leave the water drops with a positive charge? Or are we looking at ionization of the air within the ring (positive ions sucking electrons from the water)?
 

Mick

  • Guest
None
« Reply #5 on: 03/10/2009 12:46:10 »
...no that wouldn't work either -- dammit!
 

Josh

  • Guest
None
« Reply #6 on: 26/10/2009 00:14:37 »
Scuse me,
Is there a way to harness this 1000v energy?
 

Samuel Moon

  • Guest
None
« Reply #7 on: 28/10/2009 13:28:31 »
I want to know how we can measure the voltage in this equipment(Kelvin's water dropper)
 

Calum

  • Guest
None
« Reply #8 on: 03/12/2009 18:26:00 »
I think it is important to mention that the effect is due to Electrostatic Induction ( see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrostatic_induction ).
 

Adrian

  • Guest
None
« Reply #9 on: 27/06/2010 05:59:08 »
Hello i was wondering why my Klevin Water dropper is not working. I have practically copied the model in the video except my drippers are 50ml glass burets (large pippets) and i have a wire attaching these together  they then drip down through my inducers (coat hanger wire) to my collectors which are baked bean tins with an alumnium false bottom which  i added due to the plastic lining on the inside of the cans also i have done the experiment in the souther hemisphere with aproxx 60% or less humidity and i dont know if its my flow rate thats the promblem or what also i checked for shorting with an am radio but there wrre none also i was aproxx getting 1.5 dropps per second
thanks if any one has a solution please contact me on aj_wild@msn.com
 

Michael (Tasmania)

  • Guest
None
« Reply #10 on: 19/05/2016 11:12:08 »
The water holding containers and droppers can be made from electrically insulating materials and not connected to earth provided there is a water path connecting them allowing ions to flow from one dropper to the other as in a variant I have made.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

None
« Reply #10 on: 19/05/2016 11:12:08 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums