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Author Topic: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?  (Read 5527 times)

Offline ScientificAngel

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That can be produced from volume increase liquid water-solid water.
There are some places on earth where the temperature oscillates every day between a negative and a positive degree.
Taklimakan and Atacama desert are two great examples.
We would can produce a lot of sodium with this
energy and Atacama salt in Chile.

I add:
if the temperature oscillates between two negative numbers
then is also possible to produce energy under pressure.



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God can give to us 4 new
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« Last Edit: 17/12/2010 00:01:02 by chris »


 

Offline David Sparkman

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Re: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?
« Reply #1 on: 05/09/2005 15:54:36 »
Energy rich countries typically use it to produce energy intensive materials such as Aluminum. Canada has done this in the past as has the NW USA. But with population growth, and the normal stupidity on the part of California (those guys that believe there is a free lunch), exporting energy directly has been more profitable.

Alcoa's aluminum plant in Wanatchia, WA was shut down for a few years while Alcoa profited by it's 25% ownership of the output of Grand Coolee dam. Canada has several aluminum plants in Quebec, but is finding a market for it's electricty in New England. Brazil has a lot of hydroelectric power, and is using it to make Aluminum, pig iron, and foundry alloys such as MgFeSi, FeMn and others. There are no countries near enough to Brazil for it to sell it's electricity directly.

China is switching back to coal because it's oil has run low and the world market is very expensive right now.

The most direct way to harvest energy in the desert would be though solar panels or by converting wind power. I am sure both have their problems with the dust out there, but it should be solveable if they can find an economic way to "bottle" it with sodium or some other energy intensive material.

As prices go up many things become possible.

David

re: California - no new generating plants in ages. They would rather buy their energy from Mexico, where the polution standards are much less expensive. But when the wind is just right, Mexico exports their polution to California. This is not a rational solution.
« Last Edit: 05/09/2005 15:57:04 by David Sparkman »
 

Offline ScientificAngel

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Re: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?
« Reply #2 on: 15/09/2005 14:29:53 »
Dust is not a problem in the Andes or in Tibet...
But I think this method gives more energy than solar panels.




God can give to us 4 new
earth scientifically from Jupiter...
 

Offline ukmicky

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Re: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?
« Reply #3 on: 16/09/2005 00:47:01 »
There's lots of way to create energy. even hanging a metal plate in ths sea can create electricity
Dont ask me how though coz i dont know
 

Offline CliffordK

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Re: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?
« Reply #4 on: 14/12/2010 08:01:23 »
Your problem with "ice expansion" energy is that you would have very few cycles...
Perhaps one cycle per night.

So, you would have to design some thing that would generate massive amounts of energy with very little change. 

Perhaps a Piezoelectric generator?

You would probably be better off discarding your newly formed ice sheet, and getting fresh liquid water to freeze which would mean wasting some of your energy on pumping.

If you oscillated between... say 20F and 35F (-5C to +2C), it would be unlikely that you could generate sufficient freeze/thawing as you would have difficulty freezing a slab 1" thick in a single night at 20F/-5C, or remelting the next day at 35F/+2C.

If you could eject the slab and start anew, then you might be able to effectively work with much lower temperatures.
 

Offline peppercorn

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Re: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?
« Reply #5 on: 14/12/2010 10:42:20 »
Your problem...

The OP hasn't even been active since August 2006.
Do you think there's anything to be learnt from this thread today?
 

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Re: Could expansion of water be used to generate electricity?
« Reply #5 on: 14/12/2010 10:42:20 »

 

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