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Author Topic: If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?  (Read 6254 times)

Cee Jai Bernard

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Cee Jai Bernard  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hello,

My name is Cee Jai (CJ) I'm from Canada and I'm a big fan of your show. I do have a question though. In the news his week, I read an article that the coldest spot in our solar system has been found in a crater on the south pole of our moon with a temperature of minus 238 degrees Celsius.

I realize that that is very close to absolute zero, but why does this bother the scientists?

Also, absolute zero is the coldest temperature we can achieve, is there a limit to how hot it can get as in the highest temperature possible?

Thanks

CJ

What do you think?


 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #1 on: 29/09/2009 10:33:19 »
Theortically-speaking, there is no upper limit to tempearature.
 

Offline rhade

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #2 on: 29/09/2009 15:56:55 »
Absolute zero, or zero Kelvin, as it is otherwise known, is a theoretic temperature which, according to the laws of thermodynamics, cannot be attained.
 

Offline LeeE

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #3 on: 29/09/2009 18:44:23 »
Re the hottest temperature possible: there is the Planck Temperature, of 1.416785(71) 1032 K, beyond which current physics theory breaks down.

Then there is also the speed of light 'c' limit when considering temperature as the kinetic energy of atoms/molecules in a medium.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #4 on: 29/09/2009 21:24:43 »
Re the hottest temperature possible: there is the Planck Temperature, of 1.416785(71) 1032 K, beyond which current physics theory breaks down.

Then there is also the speed of light 'c' limit when considering temperature as the kinetic energy of atoms/molecules in a medium.

Could be misunderstood to mean that this is the highest temperature we can go. In all due respect, this is not what the theory states.
 

Offline LeeE

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #5 on: 30/09/2009 21:34:54 »
Well, I didn't say that the Planck temperature is the highest temperature that 'we can go', just that the Standard Model doesn't currently work above it.

So basically, if you want to work with higher temperatures than the Planck Temperature you need to use a different model (atm).
 

Offline thedoc

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #7 on: 05/11/2009 09:47:36 »
Temperature = kinetic energy content.
Lightning = a whole lot of energy

Electric energy of lightning dissipated as heat
 

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If there's an absolute zero, is there a hottest temperature?
« Reply #7 on: 05/11/2009 09:47:36 »

 

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