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Author Topic: Can you solve the mystery of the acetate-eating resin?  (Read 1805 times)

Claudia Eicker

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Claudia Eicker  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Hi Chris
  
For the past few years, we've made trophies for a client.  Each trophy is a resin ball inside which a sheet of clear acetate with a logo printed on it is set.

This year, for no apparent reason, the acetate seems to be disintegrating; tiny bubbles form and then that part of the acetate seems to disappear.

Whereas in previous years, the acetate has been clear with only black ink used for the logo, the logo this year is primarily purple and maybe the purple ink is what's having this effect?

But where do these pieces of purple acetate go?  Or is it just the ink that's being "eaten" by the resin?

Can you solve the mystery of the acetate-eating resin??
  
Thanks
  
Regards,
Claudia

What do you think?


 

Offline Horseradish_5000

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Can you solve the mystery of the acetate-eating resin?
« Reply #1 on: 20/10/2009 18:28:50 »
From you description it sound like there's definitely a reaction happening.

If it just the dye that's affected perhaps you could protect it with another layer of acetate?

Think I would need more info on your process and more detail about the reaction how fast it was etc. To really tell what's happening.
 

Offline RD

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Can you solve the mystery of the acetate-eating resin?
« Reply #2 on: 20/10/2009 19:05:38 »
Possibly the ingredients of the (polyester ?) resin were not sufficiently mixed this year,
and an unmixed, unset, chemical ingredient is reacting with the encapsulated item.
(or perhaps the ratio of ingredients was different this year, e.g. too much catalyst).


Quote
Dilute solutions of 30 to 60% MEKP are used in industry and by hobbyists as the catalyst which initiates the polymerization of polyester resins used in glass-reinforced plastic, and casting.
 MEKP is a severe skin irritant and can cause progressive corrosive damage or blindness.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methyl_ethyl_ketone_peroxide

Quote
Organic peroxides, like their inorganic counterparts, are powerful bleaching agents.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organic_peroxide
« Last Edit: 20/10/2009 19:28:38 by RD »
 

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Can you solve the mystery of the acetate-eating resin?
« Reply #2 on: 20/10/2009 19:05:38 »

 

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