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Author Topic: Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?  (Read 2395 times)

Offline demografx

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« on: 23/10/2009 19:07:42 »

My 27 yr old son (a bright mathematician, musicologist and linguist) is looking for (in his words) "a physics book that describes the subject's development historically (both theoretically and experimentally), while maintaining scientific rigor and honesty (admitting to leaps of faith or necessarily vague explanations)."

Any suggestions would be greatly welcomed and appreciated!
« Last Edit: 23/10/2009 19:09:53 by demografx »


 

Offline Vern

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« Reply #1 on: 23/10/2009 19:32:12 »
"Understanding Physics", by Isaac Asimov is a book that is understandable with a high school level knowledge of the maths and general understanding. It may be a little dated by now. :)
 

Offline LeeE

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« Reply #2 on: 23/10/2009 20:37:07 »
Heh - when I saw this thread my mind immediately turned to Asmiov too.  For physics I'd recommend his "Guide to Science - book 1: The Physical Sciences".  This explains and describes the development of all the physical sciences historically, as you want, and shows how the development in one area of science leads into other areas, giving a very good overview of all the areas, but it ends a couple of decades ago, of course.

Book 2 is good as well, but that's all biology (and now probably even more out of date than the physics volume, bearing in mind the developments in genetics over the last couple of decades).

That's assuming that you can find copies.  Both should be available from your library though.

I've also heard that Bill Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything" is very good, but I've not actually read it yet.
 

Offline demografx

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« Reply #3 on: 24/10/2009 00:44:23 »


MANY THANKS Vern and Lee!! I really appreciate that. I sent my son everything you both wrote!
« Last Edit: 24/10/2009 01:02:05 by demografx »
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« Reply #4 on: 24/10/2009 04:39:00 »

My 27 yr old son (a bright mathematician, musicologist and linguist) is looking for (in his words) "a physics book that describes the subject's development historically (both theoretically and experimentally), while maintaining scientific rigor and honesty (admitting to leaps of faith or necessarily vague explanations)."

Any suggestions would be greatly welcomed and appreciated!

David Bodanis

E=Mc^2 -  a great wee history written within
 

Offline demografx

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« Reply #5 on: 26/10/2009 02:24:42 »

Thank you, Mr S. I appreciate that recommendation and forwarded it to him. $2.44 bargain from Amazon! :)
« Last Edit: 26/10/2009 02:36:53 by demografx »
 

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Can anyone recommend a physics book for my son?
« Reply #5 on: 26/10/2009 02:24:42 »

 

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