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Author Topic: Discuss: The Diseased Brain  (Read 7631 times)

Offline thedoc

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« on: 27/10/2009 16:41:12 »
We explore the basis of brain diseases on this week's Naked Scientists.  We find out what happens to the brain in Huntington's disease, discover the genes behind Alzheimers and a potential treatment for autoimmune diseases like Multiple Sclerosis or MS.  Also, the nerve cells in the ear that make loud sounds painful, the extraordinary eyes of the Mantis Shrimp and the world's largest web spinning spider.  Plus, how spiders make glue from silk and snot, and in Kitchen Science, we show you a way to fool your brain into making your body do something unexpected.
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Luke

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« Reply #1 on: 27/10/2009 16:41:12 »
How Long Can system functions Last For?
 

Luke

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« Reply #2 on: 25/10/2009 18:45:26 »
*How Long Do Brain Disease Last For?*
 

Offline chris

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« Reply #3 on: 28/10/2009 07:54:00 »
Unfortunately, probably a life time since the brain and spinal cord are notoriously poor at self-repair in adulthood.

Chris
 

Offline RD

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« Reply #4 on: 28/10/2009 09:07:34 »
The insulation on the nerve ‘wires’, (myelin on axons) , can grow back if damaged.
This is why near-miraculous recoveries can spontaneously occur in MS because re-myelination is possible. But when the nerve ‘wire’ (axon) is damaged  typically it does not re-grow.
« Last Edit: 29/10/2009 09:45:24 by RD »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« Reply #5 on: 28/10/2009 19:35:25 »
*How Long Do Brain Disease Last For?*
I guess it depends what you call a brain disease.
Some injuries heal quite well. I'd be prepared to bet that there's someone in an ER/ casualty department right now who is currently unconscious but who will recover by tomorrow with no discernable after-effects.
 

Offline chris

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« Reply #6 on: 29/10/2009 08:56:27 »
In relation to the above, I think that depends what you call "discernable". At sufficiently high resolution it's almost certain that someone would have permanent changes to their brain if they were sufficiently ill to be rendered unconscious. This might be only the loss of a few nerve cells in the long run, but a permanent loss nonetheless.

Chris
 

Joseph Frank

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Does Alzheimers progress in all patients?
« Reply #7 on: 04/12/2009 12:30:03 »
Joseph Frank  asked the Naked Scientists:
   
Your guest said that Alzheimer's is progressive and I have read that before but my father was diagnosed with it using extensive tests 15 years ago and he isn't that bad. I wonder if he really has it or if the new medications are just very effective for him or if he has a rare form of it.

What do you think?
 

Offline nurselawyer

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« Reply #8 on: 04/04/2010 07:11:51 »
Re:  RD 28/10/09 msg stating:  "The insulation on the nerve ‘wires’, (myelin on axons) , can grow back if damaged.  This is why near-miraculous recoveries can spontaneously occur in MS because re-myelination is possible. But when the nerve ‘wire’ (axon) is damaged  typically it does not re-grow."

I believe that it is an overgeneralization to imply that all myelin can grow back if damaged.  While not an incorrect statement per se, I think it's worth it to point out that absent stem-cell transplantation, the oligodendrocyte precursors necessary to remyelinate in the CNS would not be present in sufficient quantities.


 

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Discuss: The Diseased Brain
« Reply #8 on: 04/04/2010 07:11:51 »

 

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