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Author Topic: Does dark matter really exsist  (Read 8079 times)

Offline litespeed

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Does dark matter really exsist
« Reply #25 on: 05/11/2009 20:52:13 »
PS

I have no problem at all conceptualizing mass/space/time dialation towards a complete stop in one of these BH places. I have always been perplexed that the Michaelson Morely experiments on the speed of light [the same from all directions] did not automatically produce a relativity theory on the spot.

Some people I have talked with tell me Einstein was more influenced by Maxwells equations.  However, if the speed of light is the same in all directions, what the hell else could you come up with?
 

Offline litespeed

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« Reply #26 on: 05/11/2009 20:55:44 »
I Am Out Of Beer and must retire for the day...
 

Offline Vern

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« Reply #27 on: 05/11/2009 20:58:08 »
Einstein had a head start; Poincare had already developed the Lorentz transforms and the mass energy equivalence equation, E = MC2. And Lorentz had postulated that relativity phenomena would result in flat space-time if the most elemental constituents of matter must all move at the invariant speed of light.

 

Offline Vern

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« Reply #28 on: 05/11/2009 20:58:57 »
I Am Out Of Beer and must retire for the day...
It was nice conspiring with you. :)
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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« Reply #29 on: 18/11/2009 00:10:51 »
There was a good programme on the BBC about black holes last night.

If you missed it, its on the iplayer here http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00nslc4/Horizon_20092010_Whos_Afraid_of_a_Big_Black_Hole/

I'm not sure if this can be viewed outside the UK.

Caught it, and yes it was good. The conclusion was scientists just don't know what black holes are made of as none has yet been observed directly.



That would also mean, following the same logic, we don't know if black holes are real or not, since they have not been varified-observationally.


They have been. If you see a guy spinning around and around and he's leaning so far back he should fall down you don't need to see it to know he's holding something heavy.

The same holds true for black holes. If you see a star that is rapidly shifting red and blue (moving away then moving closer) you don't need to see the black hole to know it's there.
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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« Reply #30 on: 18/11/2009 00:15:22 »
There was a good programme on the BBC about black holes last night.

If you missed it, its on the iplayer here http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b00nslc4/Horizon_20092010_Whos_Afraid_of_a_Big_Black_Hole/

I'm not sure if this can be viewed outside the UK.

Caught it, and yes it was good. The conclusion was scientists just don't know what black holes are made of as none has yet been observed directly.



Black holes are not made of anything. There is no matter inside a black hole. Only gravity.
 

Offline Vern

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« Reply #31 on: 18/11/2009 03:11:11 »
Quote from: Eric A. Taylor
The same holds true for black holes. If you see a star that is rapidly shifting red and blue (moving away then moving closer) you don't need to see the black hole to know it's there.
But you do not know that there is a Black Hole there. You only know that there is something very massive there.

The idea that a Black Hole can exist and contain a mathematical singularity that can somehow conserve massiveness is not natural. It is not possible in nature. It is only in our imagination that such things can exist. So, if we want to see how this relates to the real world we must conclude that there is some unknown amount of massive density at the centre of most, and maybe all, galaxies that pulls in matter and spews out radiation and ionic debris.

Edit: I am led to this speculation because I can not model the formation of a Black Hole by incrementally adding mass to a local area. If someone can do that I would like to see the equations.
« Last Edit: 18/11/2009 16:11:15 by Vern »
 

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Does dark matter really exsist
« Reply #31 on: 18/11/2009 03:11:11 »

 

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