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Author Topic: Do space travilers suffer a higher rate of cancer than other pilots?  (Read 2653 times)

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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I'm using the qualifier "pilots" here because pilots spend more time at high altitude than the general public.

 Of the 12 people who've walked on the moon 3 have passed away and the other 9 are all elderly now (between 74 and 79). Of the 3 dead only Allen Shepherd died of cancer. Pete Conrad was killed in a motorcycle accident and James Irwin died of a heart attack. This seems odd considering all 12 spent several hours working outside high above the magnetosphere being dossed with high energy radiation.


 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Gamma Radiation Detector used on a Ryanair flight to show incresed dose with altitude.

Had to do it :)
 

Offline Pwee

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Maybe I missed out on something but are there some naked photos of them on the moon? I always see them in those ugly huge spacesuits that block radiation and of course in the spacecraft, whats shielded too.
/sarcasm

Astronauts are one of the most healthy people on earth. They live healthy too, exercise, good food, no smoking etc. They have access to the most advance medical assistance out there. All of this reduces the chance of cancer. I guess their chance of dieing in cancer is a bit different then in the general public (OK, commercial flight pilots are generally healthy too).

I watched Planet ES, a rather old but brilliant anime series. Its main theme is the everyday life of the inhabitants of a near earth space station. It addresses the radiation poisoning issue too. You should check it out.
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Not so fast. 6 of the 7 "original" astronauts smoked. Many members of later classes also smoked even into the 1970's. Deke Slayton only quit smoking as part of a program he followed to overcome a heart problem that had grounded him during the Mercury Program. He crewed 1 mission Apollo-Soyuz Test Project. (Slayton was the second Mercury astronaut to die after Grissom. Slayton died of cancer and Grissom died in the Apollo 1 fire.)
 

Offline that mad man

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mountaineirc1969.

Can you explain what this high energy radiation is made up of?
 

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