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Offline Mr. Scientist

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« on: 09/11/2009 14:26:37 »
Part 1

Particle Coherence

In the standard model, we have predictions that are based on why they have the mass they have, but the predictions soon manifest themselves into a strange paradoxical question: Why these certain masses, and not the other quantities? In quantum physics this is called the Heirarchy Problem. Another problem, which seems within the midst of the Heirarchy Problem, is why the particles we observe have the properties of coherence.

Coherence of particle behaviour is quite simple. It is a measure itself of how the fundamental particle cohere together to present the quantum actions which take place everyday, such as entanglement, matter-antimatter collisions cohere to make quantum energy again, particles also cohere very efficiently when exchanging energy, and even those which come together to create the nuclei of atoms; there are many coherence examples in quantum physical transactions. But the essential question right now is, what makes these particles so interactive? Why do most of the baryonic matter we see today work in the way they do?

Some might hypothesize that the particle masses and their uncanny ability to work in harmony is a sign that something in the distant past corrected these values to create the universe we inexorably observe today. Indeed, we could have had one of those impobable universes where particle masses where extremely obscure, where matter found it difficult to perturbate natural coherences among the many particles of the standard model. It also raises the question of course, how much coherence there really is. With the hypothetical discovery of dark matter, there seems to be a fundamental breakdown on large distances concerning coherence. It may not necessrily have anything to do with the large distances involved, though whilst that remains a putative arguement against a contending theory that relativity fails on large distances, but rather was to highlight the fact that if coherent particles exist in our part of the galaxy in their magnitude, then greater parts of the universe have inevitably been created with particles in a not-so-coherent-state; afterall, dark matter covers nearly 30% of all unseen matter, unseen because they fail to cohere correctly with the electromagetic fluctuations.


How efficient then was the universe to have particles cohere accordingly?

It stands to reason that just because there are large area's which show a decadence in coherent abilities, may actually have been ''designed'' (1) - we live in a small portion of the universe. Atleast only 1% of all spacetime actually constitutes real matter, and there are about 10^80 particles in the observable universe. On the grand scale of the universe, where dark matter pervaids the unseen there are still clumps of real matter we can observe, and they are scattered throughout the universe in their large galactic steller systems. We are not entirely sure how dark matter influenced the early universe and we are undecided how important dark matter is today to the structure of the universe, simply because we know so little about it, other than showing gravitational forces where their should not be any, indicating that the fundamental particles of dark matter cease to cohere with the fundamental particle of the photon; on another note, if there had been no dark matter, is it possible that the universe would not have progressed efficiently as it has today? You may have come to realize, that i am trying to show the possible importance of dark matters appearance within spacetime, even though it has a degraded type of coherence in the universe on the electromagnetic spectrum.

I will make one last arguement concerning coherence in the universe. It's a not a theory, but a hypothesis.

Physicists have often believed that the actions within the universe require a sufficient explanation to why the Heirarchy Problem persists, and why certain particles seem to cohere to bring about the complex universe we observe in its vast array of spectacular wonder. I question this logic.

Would we have been more surprised if particles where obscure in a particular vacuum with a particular arrangement of dimensions? This vacuum is not seperate of the matter and energy which pervaid it. In fact, general relativity sucessfully made an interdependance between energy, mass and spacetime, making these things one part of the same manifold. Remove matter, and you would have a pure gravity solution, but these solutions are not sensible according to general relativity, simply because a vacuum cannot exist without fundamental fluctuations. Simply stated, the vacuum is the presence of some underlying quantum field of virtual vibrations within the fabric of spacetime. Might it be, that when our metric spacetime appeared, there really was no other efficient way to create the particles other than what we see today? I hypothesize that the fundamental particles manifested from spacetime in the most efficient way possible, as to attain the correct masses we observe today. If we limit what a fundamental particle can appear as using a ground state energy, then the electron appeared equally under the most energy-conserving way (conserved without using a superfluous amount of energy). A greater deal of energy would almost certainly imply the creation of much more larger particle masses due to the relationships given from special relativity.

In a nutshell, if there are any other universes out there, ours must be one that is in its lowest quantum energy state (2).

So, the question is: Is the Hierarchy Problem one which is answerable by saying particle masses where formed in the least amount of energy possible, and thus the particle masses we observe are directly associated to such an energy-condition? The coherence of particles will also fall into place, because most coherence is based on mass-values, and their quantum fields respectively.


(1)  I am not appealing to a grand creator, but remaining scientific, i mean this from a predeterministic nature behind the initial first instant of big bang, where the laws of the universe was invaluably chosen.

(2) Because of this, i not so long ago realized that if this is the case, our universe is truely unique. In what i called an irreducibly-complexity of the universe can be applied to a multiverse scenario. If our universe began in a ground state, then all other universes in the multiverse (must) according to quantum physical laws have the universes arrange themselves in their superpositioned states much like how electrons arrange themselves inside an atom. Since our universe was found to have an extremely low entropy in the past, there are many mathematical considerations suggesting the universe also arose in a ground state. If our universe is the lowest energy state of all universes, then why did the universe become so special to be situated on the lowest spectral end of the energy arrangement? This posits the problem/paradox that no other universe should exist, because it seems ridiculous to think that we are the lowest and most uniquely-formed universe and so puts other universes existences into question. To resolve the problem, i suggested that universes may be much like how ZPE Field is understood. Zero-Point energy is the unnatainable freezing point of all quantum motion, but no matter how much you try to reach that state, there always exists half the amount of the energy of the quantum ocillator. If zero-point energy is in fact the lowest energy one could try and achieve, then perhaps equally the lowest state of energy for universes operate in much the same way. I am undecided on whether that arguement will suffice.


 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #1 on: 13/11/2009 12:51:06 »
Did no one find this even remotely ineresting to answer too :(


Fishing for with bait here... as they say... its a patient bloodsport.
 

Offline Vern

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #2 on: 13/11/2009 17:32:05 »
I read it; it is interesting; but I am not a great fan of Quantum theory, so I didn't feel I could contribute very much.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #3 on: 14/11/2009 01:05:38 »
Oh...
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #4 on: 14/11/2009 01:05:53 »
Well, thanks anyway :)
 

Offline Vern

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #5 on: 14/11/2009 16:34:42 »
If there are specific parts of it you would like to discuss, I'll try and contribute. It is really difficult for me to get into Quantum theory, but I have studied it. I share Shrodinger's view of it.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #6 on: 15/11/2009 05:08:29 »
Well, the coherence principle even refers to you particle photon model of amplitudual peaks and how the magnetic half-cycles and the photo-magnetic cycles operate. They operate in a very pucliar arrangement, and if it all mass values do depend on initial energy conditions at Big Bang... then there should be no-one who can argue that even this low enrgy state still has a lot of undertainty. As a suggestion, time and energy are related. Since energy is the same thing as mass but with the added coefficient c^2, could the uncertainty at t=1 caused a perturabtive influence of uncertainty of the products of their respective masses?
 

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The Heirarchy Problem and Particle Coherence
« Reply #6 on: 15/11/2009 05:08:29 »

 

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