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Author Topic: What does an Induction loop do?  (Read 6160 times)

Offline neilep

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What does an Induction loop do?
« on: 09/11/2009 18:03:41 »
Dearest Induction-loopologists !

As a sheepy, I of course have perfect hearing...well, apart from my left ear losing it's friggin low-end base-ability...I find that I can hear quite well !...which is nice !

I was today at my GP getting my flu jab where I saw this hearing thing induction loop thingy ! I took this piccy with my phone !



The Hearing Thing Induction Loop Thingy A Short While Ago



The hearing thing induction loop thingy said to turn your hearing aid to the 'T' setting !

Whys that then ?..I've seen the same in banks too !

Why should a hearing aid need specific attention in a certain place and what does an Induction Loop do and what is the 'T' setting ? Why is it any different to a regular setting ?


As a firm believer in empirical study I asked this jelly as it was also setting



A Setting Jelly


...all it did was wibble wobble and make me think of girlies running !...so, no luck there but I am grateful for the imagery !


If ewe can help me I will reward ewe with sweet nothings whispered in your ear !



Hugs and shmishes


Mwah mwah mwah !!




neil
Induction Loop Thingy Asker
xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
« Last Edit: 09/11/2009 18:05:30 by neilep »


 

Offline FuzzyUK

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #1 on: 11/11/2009 08:57:13 »
You can by a DIY kit to install a wire induction loop around a room or say, your favorite chair in the house (toilet?). The loop is then connected to an audio amplifier incorporating an automatic gain control (AGC) which stops your ear getting blasted from any inadvertent high level signal fed into it from an external audio source like a TV, radio, PC, etc.

Example:
http://www.tecear.com/UniVox_DLS50_Loop_Kit.htm
« Last Edit: 11/11/2009 08:59:25 by FuzzyUK »
 

Offline neilep

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #2 on: 11/11/2009 11:33:48 »
An induction loop system transmits a signal directly into a hearing aid via a magnetic field, greatly reducing background noise, competing sounds, reverberation and other acoustic distortions that reduce clarity of sound.

The "T" probably stands for "telecoil" or maybe "telephone" (see below).

A transmitting system in the room transforms sound signals into magnetic waves broadcasted into the room.  Hearing aids set to "T" switch over to pick up these magnetic waves instead of the sound waves in the room.  In a doctor's waiting room (especially in a hospital) this system provides an alternate means by which hearing disabled people can hear announcements over the public address system.  So, for example, older people with severe hearing loss who use a hearing aid don't need to strain over the wailing babies, screeching kids, squeaky gurneys and wheelchairs, slamming doors, clumping footsteps and echoing hallways to hear the announcements.

The "T" may as well stand for "transformer", because the principle works the same.  The coil built into the room is energized by an electric signal that the coil converts into a magnetic signal.  The hearing aid, now sensitive to magnetic signals by means of its own coil, receives those signals, converts them into electricity, amplifies them, converts them into sound waves and sends it into the recipient's ear.  (Who says old folks aren't "connected"?!)

These systems have applications in many situations: TV rooms, train/bus stations, airports, schools & universities, sports arenas, museums, churches, theatres, auditoriums, medical facilities, government buildings, drive through windows, ticket windows, etc. 

Telephones.  I would think that this also works with telephones, because plenty of seniors complain that listening to a phone makes their hearing aids screech.  The ear's end of the phone's handset contains a small loudspeaker, which contains a eletromagnetic coil that vibrates a diaphragm which produces sound waves.  It would be rather easy to build a small coil into a hearing aid to pick up the magnetic waves produced by the phone instead of picking up the sound waves.

These systems have come about through, for example, the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) in the UK and through the Americanís with Disabilities Act (ADA) in the US, although it's not so well-known (or used) in the US. 

THANK EWE very very much for this extremely well written and informative post DiscoverDave. I now understand...thank you !

Just still a very small tad confused because the GP surgery is just a small office and there's certainly no PA system. Patients are advised to go to the doctor via a ' beep' and a scrolling led sign. The staff do not use any specific apparatus to speak through and generally the GP waiting area is very quiet.  Hmmm..it is a loud Beep that announces the next patient...could it be because of that I wonder ?

Thank ewe again for your great post.
 

Offline neilep

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #3 on: 11/11/2009 11:36:37 »
You can by a DIY kit to install a wire induction loop around a room or say, your favorite chair in the house (toilet?). The loop is then connected to an audio amplifier incorporating an automatic gain control (AGC) which stops your ear getting blasted from any inadvertent high level signal fed into it from an external audio source like a TV, radio, PC, etc.

Example:
http://www.tecear.com/UniVox_DLS50_Loop_Kit.htm

That's fantastic !..Thanks FuzzyUK...I don't need one yet but there's great info at that site.

Thanks again
 

Offline syhprum

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #4 on: 12/11/2009 22:11:55 »
I have some hearing loss and would like a mobile phone to which I could attach an earpiece and use its microphone to help my hearing.
Considering the complexities that are built into mobile phones you would think this was not much to ask but no one seems to make them.
You can get phones with WIFI, GPS, Radio,s  etc for a very modest price but similar deaf aids sell for the price of a secondhand car with lots of strings attached.
 

Offline RD

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #5 on: 12/11/2009 22:38:38 »
I have some hearing loss and would like a mobile phone to which I could attach an earpiece and use its microphone to help my hearing.
http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=25423.msg274131#msg274131
 

Offline techmind

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #6 on: 28/11/2009 17:33:17 »
Just still a very small tad confused because the GP surgery is just a small office and there's certainly no PA system. Patients are advised to go to the doctor via a ' beep' and a scrolling led sign. The staff do not use any specific apparatus to speak through and generally the GP waiting area is very quiet.  Hmmm..it is a loud Beep that announces the next patient...could it be because of that I wonder ?

DiscoverDave is right on the mark.

To clarify from your follow-on question, the induction-loop allows the hearing-aid (when switched to 'T') to reproduce audio 'directly' from the sound-system installation in the building. While often this may be a sophisticated PA system, it could just be a single small discrete microphone connected to one of those portable T-loop panels (the black pad with the handle in Neilep's photo). In this way, if the receptionist speaks into her microphone at close-range then to the hearing aid wearer it'll sound like they're talking right in their ear.

The 'coverage' of a 'T'-loop depends purely on the size of the wire loop. For a large room, hall, or auditorium, you lay a wire around the perimeter of the room. In a bank, you might put one loop around each cashier-window (fed from a microphone in front of the cashier), or in the portable devices the loop is contained within the black pad - so they only have a range of a couple of feet.

It's a very simple low-cost system, which has been in common use in churches/theatres/auditoriums in the UK for several decades. Smaller, portable 'T'-loop systems for one-to-one communication have probably become rather more common in the past 5 years or so, with increasing disability-discrimination legislation.
 

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What does an Induction loop do?
« Reply #6 on: 28/11/2009 17:33:17 »

 

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