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Author Topic: Are plants close to suffocating?  (Read 10624 times)

Offline Geezer

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Are plants close to suffocating?
« Reply #25 on: 04/12/2009 06:44:08 »

Looking at the slope of the lines in that article you posted, I'd say it's pretty steep, so it'll be closer to 20% than 5% imo.

Some plants live on the edge, far from all plants..
Their size however is always at the edge. If there would be more available of the limiting factor, the tree would be bigger.
Note: If everything in the environment is plentiful, the limiting factor would be the tree's genetics

I would not argue. It could be 20%. I had always assumed that plants had access to as much CO2 as they could consume, but that does not seem to be entirely correct. From a plant's "perspective", CO2 may not be superabundant.

Either way, I doubt that this has much impact on the Earth's climate in the long term.
 

Offline litespeed

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Are plants close to suffocating?
« Reply #26 on: 10/12/2009 01:44:33 »
Geezer

A few years ago I took a boat ride in a huge underground cave. On the banks were some small incandescent lights to illuminate the vast blackness. Near each and every one of these lights grew ferns.  I still believe it would be a financial bonanza to select and propogate these ferns for low light indoor cultivation.

Natural selection is HUMONGOUS.  For instance, deep ocean "Black Fumerols" are surrounded with multiple life forms that rely not one WHIT on photosynthesis.  I don't even see a way even the most imaginative Dr. Know could eliminate them.
 

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Are plants close to suffocating?
« Reply #26 on: 10/12/2009 01:44:33 »

 

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