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Author Topic: What is "A Pocket Full Of Acorns" ?  (Read 74717 times)

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Kudos is all yours. I am glowing with the warmth that you are going to plant trees in your field. If it is a large field and you need help to convert it for free, contact the local media and ask them to locate some helpers giving instructions on where to find the saplings and seeds etc and they will come. Believe me they will come. It is fantastic to see the young and old helping each other to plant trees. Doing it this way also encourages more people to act rather than become innocent bystanders and will ensure that they will go on to plant many more trees.

We have a woodland here now with some of the trees standing 25 feet. The badgers  have just moved in and a number of the trees have already been thinned out to make room for the ones that are doing the best. The field is called peoplesfield, named after all of the people that transformed it into the lush woodland it is today.

RESPECT And Kudos from   Andrew and family 

Kudos.  I have taken saplings from areas that I knew they wouldn't survive and planted them on our property.  I had to fight with my husband to plant trees in the open field we bought (and don't use), till he agreed let 1/5 "go wild".  He is concerned about lowering the property value.

I talked him into mowing no closer than five feet from the fence line that way the birds could deposit seeds from trees they like to eat.  But after reading this I am going to plants some seeds and saplings around the fence to give them a one up.  I shall also start carrying some seeds with me come early spring through summer.  You have my word.  Thank you for your encouragement. [^]


 

Offline Bass

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Recently acquired around 500 acres of clear-cut timberland- will plant close to 20,000 seedlings (mostly longleaf and loblolly pine) by the end of January.  These will be thinned in 12 to 15 years, allowing growth of a sustainable forest.



Part of the clearcut land currently being replanted



Holding up a longleaf planted 7 years ago in a similar reforestation project
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Bass Are there any other native species that should be growing there also, like oaks, maple and other broadleaves? If so these can be a great asset to the soil quality and wildlife and also help to prevent fires from spreading rapidly, while greatly enhancing the appearance of the forest.

Here in the U.K. The forestry commission have realised the importance of hard woods mixed with commercial softwoods. The logic being that the hardwoods grow much slower and when the soft woods are ready for logging the landscape is not clear felled but holds a generation of highly profitable hard wood timber, while at the same time maintains the soil texture with deciduous leaf litter ready for the next cash crop of softwoods.

Your work is impressive. 500 acres is more than I can dream of planting out.

The pocket full of acorns project could be used to great effect with your 500 acres. Use the logic of the simple project to call for help to plant it out and ask people to bring in native saplings and seeds to plant among your softwoods. This would undoubtedly produce a wide variety of trees, resembling the ancient landscapes.

The woodlands we have planted in the U.K. look terrific and varied from holly, crab apple, field maple, oak, chestnut, ash, white beam, rowan, cherry.

Kudos to you also Bass. Nice to know people like you are out there making sure the soil does not end up in the river basins.

Andrew     
 

Offline Bass

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Andrew
We do plant hardwoods as well, but in fewer numbers.  The hardwoods do better in the bottoms and wetter sites, the softwoods (especially the longleaf) are the climax trees in this area.  Hardwoods are predominantly oak, maple and hickory.

I've really enjoyed learning more about forest management.  Long-range plans call for thinning the trees at around 12 to 15 years and again around 28 to 30 years, then selective cutting afterward, relying on mostly natural seeding to replenish the forests.

My brother and I started doing this a bit of land at a time back in the early 90's, we now have several thousand acres under reforestation.  We can produce enough income now from our past purchases to cover the cost of further land acquisition and reforestation.

In the top picture, you can see another 400 acre plot we planted in 2001- the green swath under the ridge in the background.  My kids, who will reap the benefits of our program, are all becoming good land stewards.  We also take part in a local program that takes local school children out on field trips to educate them on the value of trees.

My hat is off to you for your pocketful of acorns idea.
« Last Edit: 17/01/2008 18:25:49 by Bass »
 

Offline Karen W.

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Andrew
We do plant hardwoods as well, but in fewer numbers.  The hardwoods do better in the bottoms and wetter sites, the softwoods (especially the longleaf) are the climax trees in this area.  Hardwoods are predominantly oak, maple and hickory.

I've really enjoyed learning more about forest management.  Long-range plans call for thinning the trees at around 12 to 15 years and again around 28 to 30 years, then selective cutting afterward, relying on mostly natural seeding to replenish the forests.

My brother and I started doing this a bit of land at a time back in the early 90's, we now have several thousand acres under reforestation.  We can produce enough income now from our past purchases to cover the cost of further land acquisition and reforestation.

In the top picture, you can see another 400 acre plot we planted in 2001- the green swath under the ridge in the background.  My kids, who will reap the benefits of our program, are all becoming good land stewards.  We also take part in a local program that takes local school children out on field trips to educate them on the value of trees.

My hat is off to you for your pocketful of acorns idea.

Bass That is truly wonderful and your pictures are great as well as what you are doing to re-establish these forests. Amazing! Thank you!
 

Offline Karen W.

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Way to go Karen, knew you would not let our planet down :)
I will plant one tree.. here in the next couple weeks! I love trees!

Your Welcome Andrew.. I really miss the redwoods they cut down around my house.. They were mixed also and at least it was not clear cut as some places.. They left the pine and oak and fur, as well as others smaller varieties which just grew there naturally also.. Pepperwoods too!
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Bass it has long been a compelling drive of mine to have a desert coastline reforested using waste water to fix the sand grains by replacing the organic material from human and farm waste, while irrigating with the relatively salt free grey water. The idea is that once the thermal barrier has been removed from the coastline, which is currently preventing moisture from crossing onto the land caused by heat generated on the hot dry sandy soils rising into the air forming an invisible thermal barrier.

Once removed / damped down with irrigation and established forest, the trees would milk the moisture from the ocean and become self-sustaining as the barrier moves further and further inland. Furthermore, the moisture rising from transpiring trees and vegetation would help to reduce the energy from the sun by helping to block out it's penetration to the soil along with the canopy cover, local temperatures would fall and during the night, rain would fall in areas that have not had rain for years.

It is also my take that the removal of the trees in the first place dramatically reduces the annual rainfall in clear felled areas, and when it does rain it has devastating effects with flash floods and mud slides.

In the huge clear felled areas you are reforesting, is there a record of the past rainfall from when it was forested and today?

Andrew
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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“Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground”
 

Offline Bass

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Andrew
we have regional rainfall totals- no local rainfall totals.  Regional totals reflect weather/climate patterns of the southeast U.S.  Don't know if there is any difference of not.  We have, however, seen a dramatic increase in wildlife and more cover/forage is available.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Bass any chance of a location and a summary of local land area, I.E location of inland water, coastline, river?
Or a location on Google Earth would suffice :)

Bass, you and your Bro are environmental heroes.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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What Bass and his Brother are up against.
http://www.fws.gov/carolinasandhills/longleaf.html

A disappearing ecosystem...
The longleaf pine/wiregrass ecosystem, the characteristic habitat of Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, once covered approximately 90 million acres in the Southeastern United States. This unique ecosystem, shaped by thousands of years of natural fires that burned through every two to four years, has been reduced to fewer than two million acres, representing a 97 percent decline in this important ecosystem. Today, only scattered patches of the longleaf pine/wiregrass ecosystem occur, primarily in the coastal plains of the Carolinas, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas. About half of these surviving stands of longleaf pine exist on public lands.
 

Offline Bass

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Andrew
Input Sylacauga, AL into Google Earth.  We have lands to the southwest of Sylacauga in Coosa County, and also to the east in Clay County.

While I appreciate the accolades, we didn't do this for environmental reasons, we did it to produce income.   But it's nice when responsible land stewardship and making a livelihood work in harmony.

Once the Longleaf reaches a certain height, we burn the ground litter/duff about every 5 years or so.

I'll be gone a couple of weeks, but will try to show more specific locations when I get back.
« Last Edit: 21/01/2008 03:54:37 by Bass »
 

Offline Carolyn

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Bass, I don't want to drift off topic, but I'm just curious.  Do you guys have a kudzu problem in Alabama and if so have you been able to control it?

My parents live on almost 200 acres in Georgia and have a small section that is being overrun with this awful vine.  So far they've had no luck getting rid of it.  Some neighboring plots have been completely overrun with it.
 

Offline Bass

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Carolyn
Kudzu, nasty stuff.  We are constantly fighting it.  Combination of trimming/cutting with herbicide application will work, but it usually takes several applications.  We try to catch it before it can get out of hand.

Rumor is, if you sit and watch kudzu, you can actually see it grow.  Tell your parents good luck.
 

Offline Carolyn

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Thanks Bass, they've slowed it down with a few controlled burns and herbicides but haven't eliminated the problem.  Not sure how much longer my Dad will be able to handle it alone....I'm afraid we're not much help while we're in Florida.

Haha...I think I have seen it growing there.
 

Offline Bass

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Andrew-
Sorry for the delay, but here is a Google Earth view showing approximate land boundaries (outlined in red)- we don't own all the property inside the boundaries.  Just heard today that about 700 acres damaged by tornado, guess I'll be heading to Alabama soon to help get salvage logging started.

« Last Edit: 18/02/2008 18:28:46 by Bass »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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How bad was the tornado damage Bass?
 

Offline Bass

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we lost close to 700 acres of trees- a strip about 1/4 mile wide by 4 miles long.  We have managed to salvage all of the pine, and are in the final phases of salvaging the remaining hardwood.  Will replant the area next winter- probably 80% longleaf and 20% loblolly pine.  Hardwoods will naturally reseed.
With timber prices down and salvage operation, probably only got 1/4 the revenue compared to last year.
At least the revenue will barely cover the replanting costs.  Can't fight mother nature, but she sure can make a mess of things.
Was down there two weeks ago, will post some pics soon.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Thats pretty bad. Can you get the media to help with the replanting, there are thousands of people that would come to help out if you asked them to.

Man if I lived closer I would be there with my friends to help plant so I know others will be happy to come. Especially if you supply some free beers and refreshments.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeY1n-p2auU
Let's put an end to global warming by irrigating the Desert coastlines of Africa and the Gulf's deserts by using the massive waste water generated by the developed countries to fertilize and reforest the coasts using the return ballast of super crude oil carriers. Al Gore et al use ill advised Bad Science in order to Introduce Even More Taxes in the name of protecting our environment. The rest of the world's politicians grab the opportunity of imposing heavy taxes and the people feel duty bound to pay these taxes. For the first time these greedy parasites have found a method of taxing that people feel duty bound to pay. Brilliant!
However, the real causes of global warming are not due to fuel consumption and air pollution. They are due to poor soil management. Stripping away forests and growing monoculture cash crops that impoverish the fragile soils is as old as the deserts themselves. In fact there are ample evidence of impressive civilisations that constructed the pyramids and long abandoned ancient cities, all built by humans that required feeding from the soils constantly removing the nutrients and organic matter until all that was left is sand grains. This folly is repeated over and over again and today is repeated on an unprecedented global scale. The massive tropical rain forests are fast becoming a memory. The deserts are expanding and the rain falls heavily in other places while some deserts no longer experience rainfall for several years at a time.

The real problems we all face today cannot be addressed by imposing taxes upon the people. You cannot tax the relentless sun and the rain clouds! But you can transform them into forests teaming with life, breathing oxygen, causing rain to fall and most of all cooling the planet by shielding the soil from the relentless desert sun.

At present there is an invisible thermal barrier along the hot dry coastline, which can be felt in aircrafts crossing from ocean to land and visa versa. In fact this thermal barrier is utilised by birds as they migrate along the coast without having to flap their wings gliding on the uplifting air currents.

This same thermal barrier also prevents clouds and moisture from crossing over onto the soil and falling as rain. This is the sole reason for the deserts in the first place, remove the vegetation from the coast and it stops raining! The forests in the central part of the continent or island become starved of life giving water and are set alight by lightning and Human’s lighting fires further adding to global temperatures. Nasa satellite photographs these man made fires which can be seen peppered on the surface in every continent of the globe.

Moisten the coastal soils while simultaneously replacing the organic material from human and animal bodily waste and we not only transform the sand grains into highly productive fertile soils, we remove the thermal barrier so that rain will once again fall on these parched lifeless lands.

Andrew K Fletcher
« Last Edit: 04/05/2008 11:36:14 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

Offline Bass

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Tornado damage photos:

 
damaged trees

 
looking down storm track

 
my wife, Martha, inspects the damage

Storm completely destroyed approx. 700 acres of trees on our property- 1/4 mile wide by 4 miles long
« Last Edit: 08/05/2008 23:38:31 by Bass »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Bass, thanks for the pictures. Might be a great time to check out the roots for heavy metal traces, so all might not be lost.

Nature can be quite ruthless and when it is it makes our own environmental destructive traits seem like childsplay.

Were there any types of trees that faired better against the winds?

Hope you guys will continue your important land management and forestry work. We need more people like you for sure.
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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http://www.moviesfoundonline.com/man_who_planted_trees.php

The Man Who Planted Trees, the story that inspired the Pocket Full Of Acorns Project.

A story that still brings a tear to my eyes,hope to my heart and tree seeds to the soils.
A Must Read for those who have not yet fallen under the spell of planting for the future.

Passage: The shepherd went to fetch a small sack and poured out a heap of acorns on the table. He began to inspect them, one by one, with great concentration, separating the good from the bad. I smoked my pipe. I did offer to help him. He told me that it was his job. And in fact, seeing the care he devoted to the task, I did not insist. That was the whole of our conversation. When he had set aside a large enough pile of good acorns he counted them out by tens, meanwhile eliminating the small ones or those which were slightly cracked, for now he examined them more closely. When he had thus selected one hundred perfect acorns he stopped and we went to bed.

There was peace in being with this man. The next day I asked if I might rest here for a day. He found it quite natural - or, to be more exact, he gave me the impression that nothing could startle him. The rest was not absolutely necessary, but I was interested and wished to know more about him. He opened the pen and led his flock to pasture. Before leaving, he plunged his sack of carefully selected and counted acorns into a pail of water.

I noticed that he carried for a stick an iron rod as thick as my thumb and about a yard and a half long. Resting myself by walking, I followed a path parallel to his. His pasture was in a valley. He left the dog in charge of the little flock and climbed toward where I stood. I was afraid that he was about the rebuke me for my indiscretion, but it was not that at all: this was the way he was going, and he invited me to go along if I had nothing better to do. He climbed to the top of the ridge, about a hundred yards away.


http://homepages.tcp.co.uk/~nicholson/theman.html

Johnny Appleseed  who many of us have learned of was an astute environmental businessman who planted orchards ahead of the pioneers selling them at a profit. And there is nothing wrong with profiting from making the environment a better place in my opinion. He is now immortalised and has become a legend in his own rights. Planting a few seeds can make more than a few trees grow!
« Last Edit: 01/06/2008 11:19:03 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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http://www.serwis.wsjo.pl/files/katalog/A.Skotnicka.pdf
“A Pocket Full Of Acorns” To save the Royal Navy.
While being on leave or half-pay, Captain Cuthbert Collingwood loved walking
over the Northumberland hills with his dog, Bounce, and a pocketful of acorns. As Pope claims, Collingwood dropped them wherever he saw an appropriate place (2004: 35). “Some of the oaks he planted are probably still growing ready to be cut to build ships of the line at a time when nuclear submarines are patrolling the seas, because Collingwood’s purpose was to make sure that the Navy would never want for oaks to build fighting ships upon which the country’s safety depended” (Pope 2004: 35). His forethought was not unfounded, let alone, when the war with France was on the verge of breaking out, the shortage of oaks presented a serious danger for Great Britain. The amount of timber suitable for building ships of war, diminished in six major British forests from 234,000 loads in 1608 to 50,000 in 1783 (a load was 50 cubic feet, and 8 loads - 10 tons). The woods could then give birth to only 25 or 30 ships-of-the-line. By 1791 the annual consumption for merchant shipping only had risen to 167,000 loads, while the Royal Navy faced a demand of 218,000 loads for repairs and new constructions (see: Pope 2004: 36).
The country started to be combed in search for suitable timber, for British oak was claimed to be the finest and hardly prone to rot, and due to severe shortages, help from abroad was needed. British shipbuilders valued greatly Italian oak, so called “compass-timber”, from the Adriatic shores, because it grew with curves – perfectly suitable for the rounded frames of ships. Apart from that, beams from Gdańsk and Holstein were bought, whilst American and Canadian oak was never highly regarded by the reason of its vulnerability to rot (see: Pope 2004: 36). After having the wooden hull built, the ship needed her masts to be fitted, yards crossed, guns, shots and powder, sails canvas and rigging hung, and sheeting put to the bottom of the hull in the dry dock. Pinnaces, anchors, cables, galleys, coal and wood used for cooking, provisions and clothing sold by the purser together with a variety of other cargo had to be stored in a ship of war going to her sea voyage.
« Last Edit: 14/06/2008 12:48:35 by Andrew K Fletcher »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

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Time is moving on and we will soon be gathering more seeds and saplings to plant out new woodlands or simply to enhance a garden or create a natural hedgerow. The original leaflet is now online to inspire a few more budding tree people to gather and plant trees for future generations and enhance places we visit.

We have a 20 feet woodland in Cockington now that was once a field that had most of its topsoil washed away by intensive farming. Now a woodland flourishes with wild deer, foxes and badgers.



Printable version here: http://i209.photobucket.com/albums/bb31/Andrew_K_Fletcher/Trees/APocketFullOfAcorns.jpg
 

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