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Author Topic: Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?  (Read 3278 times)

ScientificBoyZClub

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I am going to apply for UK universities for postgraduate.

Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK?

4 years full-time Hon M.Phys

How many years for P.hd?

After full time M.sci or M.Phill 4 years I get Hon M.Phys ??

please tell me ?

Some universities offer some combined courses, What is the use of taking combined courses ?

-Mathematics with theoretical Physics.
-Applied math with theoretical Physics.
-Physics with theoretical Physics.


What should I take ?
I am confused ??
« Last Edit: 23/11/2009 15:35:22 by ScientificBoyZClub »


 

Offline rosy

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #1 on: 23/11/2009 16:28:59 »
Because 4 years is considered to be how much university level study is required to reach MSci standard...
In the English/Welsh system, a 3 year undergraduate course typically leads to a BA/BSc/B(whatever else), that is, a bachelor's degree. A 4 year undergrad will lead (in science subjects) to an MSci/MPhys/MBiochem/etc, and will typically include a more demanding short research project.

There are also MPhil's, a seperate course lasting 1 or 2 years with a stronger research focus. A PhD (known in Oxford as a DPhil, but mostly as a PhD everywhere else) lasts 3-4 years (although it might be done as 2 years following from a 2 year MPhil, especially in arts/humanities subjects).

Combined courses generally just mean you do some courses in another (often related, as in maths/physics combinations) department. So you might take some extra maths courses often in the maths department as well as in the physics department to give you an extra angle on the (fairly demanding) maths required for theoretical physics. It depends on the university. X "with" Y means a course primarily in X, with a bit of Y thrown in. X "and" Y is a course with approximately equal emphasis on the two.

Also, bear in mind that everyone will be confused to some extent, including those applying from within the UK. And don't be afraid to e-mail the universities and ask anything that's not clear from their prospectus.
 

ScientificBoyZClub

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #2 on: 23/11/2009 16:36:02 »
Because 4 years is considered to be how much university level study is required to reach MSci standard...
In the English/Welsh system, a 3 year undergraduate course typically leads to a BA/BSc/B(whatever else), that is, a bachelor's degree. A 4 year undergrad will lead (in science subjects) to an MSci/MPhys/MBiochem/etc, and will typically include a more demanding short research project.

There are also MPhil's, a seperate course lasting 1 or 2 years with a stronger research focus. A PhD (known in Oxford as a DPhil, but mostly as a PhD everywhere else) lasts 3-4 years (although it might be done as 2 years following from a 2 year MPhil, especially in arts/humanities subjects).

Combined courses generally just mean you do some courses in another (often related, as in maths/physics combinations) department. So you might take some extra maths courses often in the maths department as well as in the physics department to give you an extra angle on the (fairly demanding) maths required for theoretical physics. It depends on the university. X "with" Y means a course primarily in X, with a bit of Y thrown in. X "and" Y is a course with approximately equal emphasis on the two.

Also, bear in mind that everyone will be confused to some extent, including those applying from within the UK. And don't be afraid to e-mail the universities and ask anything that's not clear from their prospectus.
thankyou rosy.
but do I need to study for 6 years in my life to get P.hd ?
MAN !?
I will be 26 years old.

In my country it's 2 years for M.sci
2 years for P.hd but universities are not good here.
 

Offline Vern

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #3 on: 23/11/2009 17:09:31 »
But you will be alive all that time, and life at the university can be quite fun.
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #4 on: 23/11/2009 18:53:29 »
If you don't enjoy studying then perhaps you shouldn't enroll on a PhD course.
 

ScientificBoyZClub

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #5 on: 24/11/2009 01:27:33 »
If you don't enjoy studying then perhaps you shouldn't enroll on a PhD course.
I really didn't mean that
I only asked what is the cause of long study ??

My girl friend is physics why wouldn't  I enjoy ??


I am going to spend my whole life for it. you will never understand my relation with physics and math.

I only asked why it is taking very long ??
some countries offer 2 years of M.sci

Ok why my replies got removed ?
why don't you reply to my messages ?
« Last Edit: 24/11/2009 02:53:10 by ScientificBoyZClub »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #6 on: 24/11/2009 19:46:56 »
It takes a lot of time to learn a lot of stuff (and even more time to do research).
 

ScientificBoyZClub

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #7 on: 25/11/2009 09:03:27 »
It takes a lot of time to learn a lot of stuff (and even more time to do research).
WOW Ok than ...
I would like to run business with physics.

LIKE "PHYSICS channel"

Physics can be good for earning. if we put it in correct use.
 

Offline techmind

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #8 on: 28/11/2009 17:51:55 »
Reading this thread, I think there might be a mis-conception somewhere:

In the UK, an M.Sci Physics degree is an undergraduate course, which is a 4-year version of the regular 3-year BSc degree. At Oxford or Cambridge, the four year degree is called M.Phys (for physics) - but is the same concept as M.Sci elsewhere (although Oxbridge have much tougher entry requirements, a somewhat different teaching style with far more emphasis on tutorials, and more challenging, tougher exams).

The universities introduced the 4 year courses ten years or so ago, partly to allow a bit more time to get students up to speed in their first year, but also with the intention of getting better parity with educational systems in mainland Europe. At one stage they were also mooting that the 4-year course would become the entry requirement to begin study towards a PhD - but I don't know where this discussion rests now.

An M.Sc is a one-year postgrad course, usually rather more specialised than an undergrad degree.

An M.Sc is not required as entry to a PhD - although for some students who only got a 2.2 in their undergrad studies, an M.Sc can be used to 'pull them up' to get them in the door.


If the original poster was looking for an undergrad Physics course, then in most universities the first year is virtually the same for all straight/ Applied/ Theoretical/ Mathematical/ Medical etc Physics degrees - and only begins to specialise in the second and further years. In many cases you would normally be able to change the emphasis at the end of your first year without much difficulty.

With regard to "Theoretical Physics" or "Physics with Theoretical Physics" this is largely a matter of nomenclature. Bear in mind that every UK university sets its own course, syllabus and examinations. This inevitably means that different universities have different standards (which good employers will be aware of), and different emphasis in their courses even of the same name. If you want to do a top science or engineering course, you should look at Oxford/Cambridge and universities belonging to the 'Russell Group'.


A PhD lasts nominally for 3 years (and is typically funded for 3 years) but it's not at all uncommon for students to take about three and a half years to finish, including writing-up. Only the exceptionally self-disciplined complete within 3 years!

You usually need a first or 2.1 degree from a good university or equivalent to embark on a PhD study, although there is scope for some discretion depending on circumstances, other experience, and whether you're self-funding.
« Last Edit: 28/11/2009 18:15:00 by techmind »
 

Offline Bored chemist

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Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #9 on: 28/11/2009 19:21:27 »
Just to be awkward (unless they have changed it recently) the chemistry course at Oxford is 4 years with the 4th spent on research and leads to a BA Hons.
If you can subsequently show that you have been using and developing the skills gained you can apply for an MA.

If you want to carry on at university you can, after 2 more years, get a D. Phil.
Confusing isn't it.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Why 4 years for M.Sci Theoretical Physics in UK ?
« Reply #9 on: 28/11/2009 19:21:27 »

 

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