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Author Topic: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?  (Read 13387 times)

Offline litespeed

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What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #25 on: 05/01/2010 19:55:05 »
"What are the simplest ways to "go green".

Do like I do. Don't procreate.
 

Offline ksushil970

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Re: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #26 on: 01/12/2012 10:23:18 »
Go green... try to make your city clean and green.Then there is only one cure of this problem that grow more plants as one can. If everyone aware to this then this will be quite helpful to all. And make the way simple go green.
 

Offline SeanB

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Re: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #27 on: 02/12/2012 14:34:18 »
I will add a simple one - use less washing powder. I use a longer cold cycle, but less than half the detergent. Clothes come out as clean, and I hang them outdoors to dry, or indoors if it is raining. I also only wash when I have a full load, so once a week. Half the detergent into the drain ( and here straight into the sea via a pipeline) and I use 45l of water extra ( 3 fills instead of 2). Now a box of washing detergent lasts for a year, not like some people who go through 3 boxes a month. Tried the tumble drier last month for the first time in years, to see if it still worked, on a cold cycle as it was raining. I also use less than half a measure of softener, lasts longer, clothes as soft and wrinkle free. To reduce ironing hang them while damp and they dry crease free, often not needing ironing.
 

Offline Don_1

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Re: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #28 on: 04/12/2012 14:15:56 »
I am not normally one to agree with the 'nanny state' policies of government, but yesterday I heard a radio 'public information' broadcast which I do find myself in agreement with.

The subject of this broadcast was waste food. The UK is estimated to waste 20% of its food. If we were to buy 20% less food, that would mean 20% production cuts, which would mean a reduction in oil based fertilisers, fungicides, pesticides, transport, processing, storage, packaging etc. It would also mean a welcome reduction in the cost of each visit to the supermarket, at a time of economic difficulty.

There is, however, a waste problem created by the supermarkets. Those 'BOGOF's and other similar promotions encourage people to buy more than they need. All too often, it is cheaper to buy 3 than it is to buy 2. That's all very well where tins of beans are concerned, but not where perishables are concerned. For example, a 5kg bag of spuds retails at 4.50, two bags will cost 9.00, but buy 3 bags and you benefit from the promotional price of 10.00 for three. If Mrs Jones normally buys 3 bags a week, then that's fine. But Mrs Brown who normally buys 2 bags a week will be sorely tempted to pay the extra 1 to get a third bag, thus saving herself 3.50 on next weeks shopping. However, Mrs Brown buys one bag the following week, only to find that the extra bag she bought the previous week is now beginning to go off. Mrs Brown now finds herself throwing 3.5 kgs of that older 5 kg bag in the bin. This is supermarket induced waste.

I do realise that these promotions can be a saving for some and that the supermarket must buy in extra stock to enable the promotion. But would it not be better to simply reduce the price per bag/kilo/item, to enable those who can make use of the offer do so rather than encourage, or sometimes even force all customers, to buy more than they might require.

By coincidence, Rhod Gilbert (one of my favourite comedians around today) made this the subject of his act on the Royal Variety Performance last night.... Go here* and drag the scroll bar to 45mins to let Rhod explain and give you a laugh into the bargain, a BOGOF, I can recommend.

*May only be available to those in the UK right now, but doubtless will be on You Tube soon enough.
 

Offline techmind

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Re: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #29 on: 04/12/2012 22:39:12 »
It is annoying that the smallest quantities of cream or creme-fraiche that the supermarket sells is about 3-4 times as much as I usually want. And of course it won't keep.  >:(     You can't get really small bags of peanuts from the supermarket (you have to buy some from the pub round the corner - at a similar price that the supermarket charges for the unnecessarily big packet).

Be aware that there is an oft-quoted "statistic" that about a third of the food we buy in the UK is wasted... but if you follow the source of this stat (as they did on BBC Radio 4's "More or Less") is transpires the "waste" includes meat-bones, eggshells and various other inedible parts of the food! So the reality is not quite that bad.
 

Offline Nicolas.Richards1982

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Re: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #30 on: 18/06/2013 12:36:34 »
There are definetely some ways how each individuam can improve the environment by "going green". However, in many contries it has to come from the government structures first. It's interesting that for e.g. India, that is far behind Eastern countries like Russia, has developed much more projects in order to raise sustainability. The topic of sustainable development in India, particularly in urban areas, is really widely discussed. An example of such projects in India: newbielink:http://www.siemens.co.in/sustainable-development-in-india/ [nonactive]
 

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Re: What are the simplest ways to "go green" ?
« Reply #30 on: 18/06/2013 12:36:34 »

 

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