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Author Topic: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?  (Read 20257 times)

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #25 on: 14/12/2009 17:38:50 »
Perhaps partially-right.

Not in the sense that we are fixed to the earth by a certain weight due to the earth's accelerational force. It's a matter of free fall.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #26 on: 14/12/2009 17:44:28 »
But i have made an error - i should never have used the term zero-gravity. I was actually referring to weight - that is weight measured ''or the aparent weight'' measured in the earth's astmosphere where the acceleration is measured against the surface of something.

ps. Zero-gravity is a very misleading term. I blame the OP lol
 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #27 on: 14/12/2009 20:10:31 »
Mr S - With all your "train of thought" posts, I don't really know what you are now saying.

Earlier you said that g for an orbiting body was zero. Are you now saying that is incorrect?
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #28 on: 14/12/2009 21:09:10 »
I can't do this right now ok. I'm having a lot of problems.

 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #29 on: 14/12/2009 21:25:01 »
A "yes" or "no" would be sufficient.
 

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #30 on: 15/12/2009 13:29:58 »
A "yes" or "no" would be sufficient.

Actually - at the time i was dealing with a police matter. So at the time, i could not suffice and bow down to your immediate requests.

g - as in the earths gravitational acceleration is according to the math zero even though the state of free fall in space is indestinguishable from the state of something falling in a state of free fall in air space. Though, when weight is conjectured g is a specific weight measurement we use for material bodies, not necesserily ones which orbit the planet earth, even though it ''can'' be correctly stated as so. It's a matter of which way one choses to look at what ''g'' actually means when weighing gravity upon the earths surface - not beyond the atsmospehere itself.

 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #31 on: 15/12/2009 20:07:27 »
Actually - at the time i was dealing with a police matter. So at the time, i could not suffice and bow down to your immediate requests.

I hope it was not a matter of too much gravity  ;D

Quote
g - as in the earths gravitational acceleration is according to the math zero even though the state of free fall in space is indestinguishable from the state of something falling in a state of free fall in air space. Though, when weight is conjectured g is a specific weight measurement we use for material bodies, not necesserily ones which orbit the planet earth, even though it ''can'' be correctly stated as so. It's a matter of which way one choses to look at what ''g'' actually means when weighing gravity upon the earths surface - not beyond the atsmospehere itself.

I think your math is a little wonky there Mr S.  Gravity exerts a force on all orbiting bodies. The force of gravity does of course vary depending on the distance between the centers of mass of the attracted bodies. It's weight that is meaningless for an orbiting body. In that respect, it is "weightless". Weight can only be meaningfully measured on a body that is not actually being accelerated by gravity.

Being in orbit is little different than running fast then jumping off the ground. When we jump, gravity applies a force that accelerates us back towards earth. An orbiting body just goes so fast that it does not return to earth, but it is being pulled back towards earth by gravitational force in exactly the same manner.

There is one aspect of this that does tend to create confusion. Matter is attracted by gravity whether it is moving relative to the force of gravity or not. The force exerted can be measured in, for example, Newtons per kilogram. However, force/mass resolves to distance/time/time which is acceleration. This is fine when a body is in free fall because it is actually accelerating at that rate. But when it is stationary on the surface of the earth, the force of gravity is obviously not accelerating the body at all.

BTW, "microgravity" when used in the context of bodies orbiting earth is very misleading. There is nothing "micro" about it. The force is a bit less than it is at the surface of the earth, but nowhere near as small as "micro" would suggest.
« Last Edit: 15/12/2009 20:14:03 by Geezer »
 

Offline Hadrian

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #32 on: 15/12/2009 20:13:12 »
I got an email from James Oberg today he said

"Thanks -- I'm glad the subject still inspires!!"


well i hope he enjoying the mature and supportive way we appere to work together here LOL

 

Offline Bored chemist

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #33 on: 15/12/2009 21:43:50 »
A "yes" or "no" would be sufficient.

Actually - at the time i was dealing with a police matter.


Somehow, that doesn't surprise me.
 

Offline yor_on

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Re: Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #34 on: 26/12/2009 02:12:23 »
An orbit is in reality a free fall. The exact same fall you would have standing on a cliff trying to see if you too can fly :)

The idea behind a 'stable' orbit is just that, to make your 'speed' relative the object you are orbiting so fast that you keep 'falling' around it without either going inward or outward. In reality there are no really 'stable orbits' that I know of though?

--------

And vwilmot. That was a cool link, I liked to read about that guy William Gilbert, albeit reading some more pages you seem to have some rather unorthodox conclusions. But it was interesting.
« Last Edit: 26/12/2009 02:36:47 by yor_on »
 

Offline syhprum

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Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #35 on: 27/12/2009 20:02:08 »
The term 'microgravity' can of course be applied to the force that the astronaut feel attracting him to the structure of the vehicle, this of course very small.
 

Offline yor_on

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Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #36 on: 31/01/2010 22:33:46 »
Isn't weightlessness just a 'free fall' following a path of less resistance?
As Langranian points will be a special case where your 'free fall' is inhibited by resistance at all 'sides'?

==
Sorry, missed that I already had...
Whatever :)
« Last Edit: 01/02/2010 00:27:19 by yor_on »
 

Offline Hadrian

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Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #37 on: 08/03/2010 00:00:58 »
so did we get and answer or what?  ???
 

Offline yor_on

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Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #38 on: 08/03/2010 13:10:05 »
It depends on how you mean in fact.
In the caption you ask  "Does gravity affect a magnetic field"
No, not as I know.

Inside the thread you ask something else.

"So I get a small magnet and hold it over a metal pin. At some point the pin appears to defy gravity and rises up to the magnet. If there was less gravity would it move sooner? "

Yes.

But that's about invariant mass and the invariant mass of the object 'creating' the magnetism. Although, it's a very messy 'field' I agree :) It depends on how you define gravitation I think, if you believe it to be a 'energy' interacting, or if you see it as 'SpaceTimes geodesics'.

Let's reformulate the question a little.

Can I by adding invariant mass 'change/bend' a magnetic field? Assuming ...no motion... whatsoever.. inside those invariant masses (think permanent magnet versus a nonmagnetic invariant mass (without any electromagnetic field at all), if possible:) and also between their 'frames of reference', them being 'at rest' versus each other? Just by adding more nonmagnetic invariant mass?

« Last Edit: 08/03/2010 13:18:24 by yor_on »
 

Offline Hadrian

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Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
« Reply #39 on: 10/03/2010 22:49:54 »
Well that cool thanks  :)
 

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Does gravity affect a magnetic field ?
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