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Author Topic: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?  (Read 11724 times)

Offline Mr. Scientist

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #25 on: 11/12/2009 16:23:29 »
**** them lol
 

Offline witsend

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #26 on: 11/12/2009 18:25:19 »
**** them lol

I've been rolling with laughter.  I realise now that the only people who interest me seldom have much respect for convention.  Not necessarily a good thing,  I know that now.  Unless, of course, one wants to live outside the boundaries of popular endorsement.  Frankly I don't recommend it.  To get back on topic here grizelda - perhaps excommunication will absolve us from that sad heritage of irrelevant relgious or scientific debate?
 

Online Bored chemist

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #27 on: 12/12/2009 15:36:00 »
"I have an alternative theory that is now substantially proven and it defies all known classical and quantum theories. "
Sorry to be the one to break this to you but that's logically impossible.
Theories in physics don't get proven right. That can be proven wrong.
Also since,as far as I'm aware, you are the only one who knows about your theory it can't have been tested very severely. After all you are hardly going to put your heart into disproving your own theory. Even if you try to there's no guarantee that you are competent to do so.

My understanding is that your theory hasn't been properly tested so claiming it to have been "substantially proven" is both arrogant and illogical.
 

Offline witsend

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #28 on: 13/12/2009 03:24:21 »
Bored chemist - I'm trying to keep this thread on topic so will NOT ANSWER YOUR POINTS HERE.

Apologies for the intrustion grizelda. 
 

Online Bored chemist

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #29 on: 13/12/2009 10:38:55 »

I remain open-minded, adventurous, enquiring and approachable.  And I'm happy to tackle the discussion of anything at all - provided it involves some departure from hackneyed regurgitated nonsense.  LOL
It doesn't look that way to me.
 

Offline witsend

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #30 on: 13/12/2009 18:56:03 »

I remain open-minded, adventurous, enquiring and approachable.  And I'm happy to tackle the discussion of anything at all - provided it involves some departure from hackneyed regurgitated nonsense.  LOL
It doesn't look that way to me.


Then I suggest you check out your eyesight.  Definite signs of myopia.
 

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #31 on: 14/12/2009 20:52:02 »
While I am grossly myopic, I wear galsses so my vision is 20/10.
I can clearly see a difference between " And I'm happy to tackle the discussion of anything at all - provided it involves some departure from hackneyed regurgitated nonsense." and "I'm trying to keep this thread on topic so will NOT ANSWER YOUR POINTS HERE"
 

Offline grizelda

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #32 on: 24/12/2009 22:00:30 »
The electromagnetic spectrum confers on us all knowledge of events which can occur in our universe. Astronomers are able to see suns being born a million light years away. This means that the star was actually born a million years ago but we are just seeing it now. So all events are captured by the electromagnetic spectrum and are theoretically observable. Since we observe the electromagnetic field, we have technically observed everything that ever existed. The thing that has never existed and we have never observed is the Higg's field. It will not come into existence until we observe the Higg's particle in the Large Hadron Collider. The Higg's particle is called the "God" particle because it is the messenger particle of the Higg's field (shouldn't it be the "angel" particle?). The Higg's field is predicated to be the agent of the annihilation and reconstruction of the universe. Of course, it will do its job immediately when it is observed, so we won't actually observe it, or anything else. Since the universe that is recreated will have exactly the same initial conditions, and follow the same laws as this universe, it will unfold in the exact same way, right down to your lack of shoelaces, until we do this all again in fourteen billion years, just like we did fourteen billion years ago.
 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #33 on: 25/12/2009 03:04:00 »
Grizelda,

I think it might be appropriate to change the title of this thread. It seems to have little to do with the actual content.

Thanks,

Geezer - Moderator
 

Offline yor_on

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Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #34 on: 28/12/2009 20:33:48 »
Grizelda, first of all, let me compliment you on your imagination. This scenario reminded me of 'The Black Cloud' by Sir Fred Hoyle, a very cool book. As for the possibility of the Higgs field collapsing just by us observing :)

It should have done it already if so, most of us expect it to exist in one form or another. To me it makes sense, and works with my own ideas too.

So the question, if you now would be right, would then be the aspect of 'observation. What you do here is treating this possible 'observation' as something 'objective' different from a theory. But the problem with that idea of reality is that everything we know is 'theory's' from that 1+1=2 to the theory of relativity and quantum physics.

And there is nothing 'objective' about it, we seem to influence our reality just by expecting things, like the way we choose to set up a experiment, the duality of light and the two (and more:) slit experiments prove that.

So the question then become if there is a 'state' of 'observation' that is more in tune with 'reality' than others. That 'objective' all true state. It sounds a little like the 'jokes' made about the trouble with LHC, that they somehow was 'needed' to hinder it from destroying our universe. I can assure you that the universe is big enough to to survive our mistakes. As well as the Higgs field, if it exists.

Objectivity is like the holy grail, in most situations unattainable. It's a human invention, like fairness, trust, love, fidelity and justice. We might change the universe, but not by the LHC:s experiments, no, if we do it will be by those new mental concepts we have introduced. Those have a value for us, fairness is always to be appreciated, as well as justice. And good and evil of course.

Beautiful ideas all of them.
 

Offline grizelda

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Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #35 on: 29/12/2009 01:54:01 »
One theory would be that the world is a figment of my imagination and I am guilty for what happens to it. But of course that would be true of everyone, and we can't all be paranoid. If the universe has been recycled an infinite number of times then this has already happened many times, of course. And in each iteration, I log my protest, to no avail. So I'm not getting my knickers in a twist about it. Wasn't Atlas the guy who spends eternity rolling a boulder to the top of a mountain, only to watch it roll back down again? (EDIT: No sorry, that was Sisyphus. I meant to look that up but forgot.) And of course, ATLAS is the name of the experiment at the LHC which will attempt to observe/create the Higg's field. Just saying. Anyway, it is probably altruistic of the scientists to recycle the universe. Otherwise it would probably just fade away, forever. And altruism is a law of nature. Sort of perverse of them to do it on Valentine's day, though. But that's just the chemistry talking.
« Last Edit: 29/12/2009 08:35:07 by grizelda »
 

Offline yor_on

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Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #36 on: 29/12/2009 19:44:40 »
Yeah, kind of cool that one, universes like drops of 'reality', spiraling of one 'main' line of existence, well, possibly so if we assume there was a 'beginning' to it. Otherwise just giving me a headache when thinking about it:)

Let us hope you're wrong about the Higgs field though. It would be such a waste dismantling us before we even started.
 

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Our fate with the Large Hadron Collider?
« Reply #36 on: 29/12/2009 19:44:40 »

 

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