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Author Topic: What programming languages come with my PC, or how can I download one?  (Read 11587 times)

DiscoverDave

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Years ago (oh my!), I remember PC's coming with some version of BASIC that allowed me to program my computer.  I miss that option (at least I can no longer find BASIC on recent machines), so is there a programming language I can use, or how can I download BASIC?


 

Offline LeeE

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Assuming you're on MS windows, I think you can get MS VB/VC(++)/C#, for personal use, for no cost from the MS website - some of the windows users here should be able to confirm that.  Otherwise, you could look at something like Python:

http://www.python.org/download/
 

Offline latebind

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Java comes on most new PC's,but of course its just the runtime, you could always download the compiler kit from sun.com.

Java is really good, I'm a java developer and I'm loving it, I'm always in demand and I get paid well.
 

Offline RD

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Years ago (oh my!), I remember PC's coming with some version of BASIC that allowed me to program my computer.  I miss that option (at least I can no longer find BASIC on recent machines), so is there a programming language I can use, or how can I download BASIC?


Microsoft offers a free BASIC ... http://www.microsoft.com/express/vb/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visual_Basic

Other free BASIC languages are available ... http://www.thefreecountry.com/compilers/basic.shtml

Including old-school ...
Quote
Vintage BASIC is an interpreter for a programming language of days gone by. A time when every home computer had a simple language called BASIC, and every kid who owned a computer learned it...
Vintage BASIC is open source software, provided under the BSD license. It will run on any platform that supports the GHC compiler, including Windows, MacOS X, and Linux.
http://www.vintage-basic.net/

[I've never used these type of BASIC programmes so cannot comment on their usefulness/reliability].
« Last Edit: 22/12/2009 16:23:16 by RD »
 

Offline SeanB

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Python is also available for free, at www.python.org for you to use. Comes with a command line, and plenty of examples and tutorials on the internet.
 

Offline Zufolek

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I run newbielink:http://sourceforge.net/projects/virtualt/ [nonactive] when I miss the BASIC that was on my old Model 100.

Without downloading something, you could probably code JavaScript. Make a new text file and put this in it:

<html>
<script>
alert("Hello world!");
</script>
</html>

and rename to .htm extension if possible. (Windoze may need to be set to show file extensions.)


Otherwise, I'd recommend you download newbielink:http://www.mingw.org/ [nonactive] and see if you like C/C++, Java, Fortran, or Ada.

After old BASIC, I personally took to JavaScript and then C. There are lots of tutorials on the web.
 

Offline Atomic-S

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I have been using Liberty Basic (www.libertybasic.com), simply because it was what I ran across somehow. There is a fee for this one. I have been highly satisfied and also dissatisfied. It has brilliant features and also some that are considerably less than brilliant. Bugs have been detected. Error messages can be somewhat mysterious. (I speak of a somewhat outdated version; I am not sure what the most current version is like). However, because of its straightforward design it is easier to use for many things than alternatives, for which reason I have not yet sought an alternative.
 

Offline stereologist

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There are a klarge number of free computer languages you can get online. What you might want is also a way of easily writing programs. You can get the Eclipse environment, and the Sharp Develop tools. These tools let you write, compile, and debug your programs all in one place.

You can get Perl from ActivePerl. There are plenty of examples online, but the language is a bit weird to use at times.

You can get a functional language called Scheme. Look for DrScheme. It also provides a tool to edit, compile, and debug.
 

Offline Don_1

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To me they're all Gobbledygook.

........ I'm always in demand and I get paid well.

Don't you just hate some people!
What am I laughing for?
 

Offline Geezer

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Z80 assembler is my all time fav, although I was pretty hot at Brand X machine code too. That was really easy because I built the machine myself, so I couldn't blame anyone else for the lousy instructions set  ;D

(I wonder if I'm showing my age   ::) )
 

Offline syhprum

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If you really like vintage stuff you can download a CPM simulation and make your fancy new machine behave like a 1970,s BBC 8085 model and run Basic on that.
 

Offline SeanB

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Or run Dosbox, and run win 3.11 on that - 16 colors and crashes too

I use it to play old games from when computers were just starting to become common.

Who remembers Prestel and our variant Beltel - I found I still have a 120/300 baud modem around.
 

Offline Geezer

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Colour! What's colour? We're talking ASR33 here!

(ASR33 was a Teletype keyboard and printer. ASR stood for Automatic Send and Receive, which meant it had a paper tape punch and reader attached - pretty hi-tek eh?)
 

Offline syhprum

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Our old Siemens R30's could use 5 hole punched tape readers, at first we had purely mechanical ones but later we had new fangled optical ones like at Bletchly park
 

Offline Geezer

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Ah, the joys of paper tape!

I worked in a Computing Science dept once where they did a deal with fledgling computer manufacturer. The Uni got a free computer in exchange for writing the OS, but, because they had no other computer, they had to bootstrap the whole shooting match from paper tape because there was no disk I/O. The OS was written in Pascal, so the source tapes got to be really big! They had almost full reels of eight hole tape.

The tape reader was really fast, but the tape dispenser for the reader consisted of one of those perspex boxes with slots cut in the sides. The reel of tape was supported on a pencil! (I'm sure you remember something similar.)

Now, that arrangement works quite well for small tape reels, but, for some very good scientific reason that I know nothing about, with a big reel, the inside end of the tape has a nasty habit of wrapping itself tight on to the pencil, usually when there is not much more tape to read. (I'm sure you've figured out where this is going.)

So, every time they edited the source, they had to punch a new source tape, which took ages, and read it to do a recompile. The tape dispenser apparently had about a 50% chance of reading the entire tape. The other 50% of the attempts resulted in the dreaded pencil lockup problem, whereupon, the dispenser would accelerate in a quite spectacular fashion, slam into the reader, and, of course the tape got mangled. This was, of course, immediately followed by a stream of obscenities issuing forth from the lab to the amazement of any undergrads who happened to be within earshot.

I'm pretty sure that I could have helped to solve the problem, but it was not my project, so I kept as far away from it as possible!

« Last Edit: 27/01/2010 19:27:19 by Geezer »
 

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