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Author Topic: What is the probability that the outer core will cool enough to lose our atmosp?  (Read 1906 times)

Offline Joe L. Ogan

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What is the probability that the outer core will cool enough that we will lose our atmosphere?  Several of the planets, Mars and Venus I think, have cooled enough that their outer core has solidified and they have lost their atmosphere.  Is that the way our earth, as we know it, will end?  Will we be aware of it while it is happening?  Thanks for comments.  Joe L. Ogan
« Last Edit: 20/12/2009 23:43:37 by Joe L. Ogan »


 

Offline JimBob

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It really isn't a probability, it is a certainty. I believe the second law of thermodynamics says that this universe "system" will come to an equilibrium state by the energy of the system moving from the higher energy state of the heated earth to the lower energy state of "space" as there are no "outside" sources of energy.

I.e., entropy happens. Or is it enthapy happens? I can't ever keep these two straight.
 

Ethos

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What is the probability that the outer core will cool enough that we will lose our atmosphere?  Several of the planets, Mars and Venus I think, have cooled enough that their outer core has solidified and they have lost their atmosphere.  Is that the way our earth, as we know it, will end?  Thanks for comments.  Joe L. Ogan
Actually Joe, Venus has a very dense atmosphere while Mars has a very slight atmosphere of mostly CO-2.

The main reason for the earth's atmosphere has more to do with it's magnetosphere. The magnetic core of the earth produces a very large magnetic field which shields it's atmosphere against the solar wind. If not for this, the solar wind would quickly reduce the earth's atmosphere to a fraction of it's present density. If the core cools substantially, this may effect the magnetosphere. I don't see this happening any time soon, however, a shift of the magnetic core could have serious consequences. So, in my estimation, a cooling of the core is not our biggest problem. It should stay quite hot for many, many thousands or even millions of years.
 

Offline Mazurka

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As Jim Bob says, it is a certainty.

Assuming that there is a civilisation at least as technologially advanced as our own, yes "we" will notice...
 

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