The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?  (Read 33700 times)

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #50 on: 07/09/2010 19:41:10 »
I knew there was a bit of legal Latin that (more or less) fitted the bill.

Whenever a fellow named Rex,
Flashed his very small organ of sex,
He always got off,
For the judges would scoff,
De minimis non curat lex.
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #51 on: 07/09/2010 22:17:45 »
;D ;D

Did I not mention I have LoB tourettes.... it is not good to encourage me  [:o)]

Welease Bwian.


OT, (ish) why do people insist on carrying on with a false argument rather than admit their are wrong? What is it in peoples psyche that makes them continue to look more and more foolish rather than just say " Hey you might be right there-you learn something new every day"  ??? I have seen it on every forum I have ever visited and on all manner of topics.

I once worked with a guy (he was in sales) called Brian Reid. Unfortunately the poor fellow had a slight speech impediment. He would come into meetings and introduce himself to customers -

"Hi. I'm Bwian Weed."

Everytime he did it I had to pretend I was looking for something deep inside my briefcase.

BTW, I did post this a long time ago on TNS, but you do know you can change the language option on Google search to "Elmer Fudd"?
« Last Edit: 07/09/2010 22:22:17 by Geezer »
 

Offline MartinTheK

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 135
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #52 on: 08/09/2010 02:02:52 »
Res Ipsa Loquitur = the thing speaks for itself

But when five self styled pundits are spouting baloney all that results is baloney to the fifth power. Now it has been asserted by the local wink, wink, nudge, nudge snicker brigade that I have been talking through my hat because I have said that the epidermis consists of dead skin ..it was asserted that this is the "stratum corneum" It is further asserted by the "experts" that the function of the epidermis is not to keep things out but to "keep water in"

Here is a relevant passage from the online Merck Manual ( which you may read at this url
http://www.merck.com/mmhe/sec18/ch201/ch201b.html

"The outermost portion of the epidermis, known as the stratum corneum, is relatively waterproof and, when undamaged, prevents most bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances from entering the body"


Furthermore as proof that NO is absorbed transdermally it was offered by these learned and honorable persons the claim that transdermal absorbtion of nitroglycerin definitely yields NO in pharmacologically active amounts similar to Viagra.

If that piece of big lie propaganda were true. Then everybody who shells out $10 per dose for Viagra is a fool because Transdermal NTG (costs pennies) would do the job. Has anybody noticed NTG ointment flying off the shelves?  It does not because this is plain old garden variety twaddle being passed off as truth.

Res Ipsa Loquitur = the thing speaks for itself

also "caveat lector"  let the reader decide for themselves. On the one hand (mine) you have my easily verifiable proof. On the other side (my learned -it says here - colleagues) and their obvious load of sniggering double entendre and hot air.

So I say go and look and then decide for yourself if you want to see who is mistaken. Scientific progress is not accomplished by having a pedantic band of self-styled experts. It is accomplished by testing hypotheses. I have refuted the hypothesis that topical NTG is not different from oral phosphodiesterase inhibitors. therefore providing indirect proof that transdermal absorbtion of NO is at best insignificant.

I don't expect truly professional scientists to insult me (or my profession as an RN) when I have done that.

Res Ipsa Loquitur

 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #53 on: 08/09/2010 07:12:21 »
You seem not to have understood the significance of the word "most" in your quote;
"The outermost portion of the epidermis, known as the stratum corneum, is relatively waterproof and, when undamaged, prevents most bacteria, viruses, and other foreign substances from entering the body".
Also,

"If that piece of big lie propaganda were true. Then everybody who shells out $10 per dose for Viagra is a fool because Transdermal NTG (costs pennies) would do the job.

Not tonight dear, the most commonly reported side effect of GTN is a headache.

 Has anybody noticed NTG ointment flying off the shelves? 


No, but I understand that other nitrates sell well, for a related purpose.

It does not because this is plain old garden variety twaddle being passed off as truth.
You are the one passing twaddle.

 

Offline Variola

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1063
  • Everyone should beware of The Pox...
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #54 on: 08/09/2010 10:53:51 »
Quote
I don't expect truly professional scientists to insult me (or my profession as an RN) when I have done that.
   

You have been insulting and patronising from the word go, and you are still persisting in trying to prove you are right when you are blatantly wrong.

Geezers signature has never been more apt.

I will leave you to BC, he has more patience to deal with wallies than I have,
 

Offline MartinTheK

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 135
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #55 on: 08/09/2010 12:50:19 »
Hi folks! It's me MartinTheK.

Thanks for having the patience to let this little show go on. I've stayed with it partly out of my own repugnance at snow jobs, and partly to show what a typical Pom does when you disagree with one of them. So watch yourselves.


Now, some may tell you that "Pom" is a derogatory term, but it was ruled to be inoffensive by the Australian Advertising Standards Board in 2006 and by New Zealand's Broadcasting Standards Authority in 2010.

So get yourself a cool drink and settle in as we return to this laugh filled episode of spot the Pom!
 

Offline Variola

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1063
  • Everyone should beware of The Pox...
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #56 on: 08/09/2010 13:28:26 »
Quote
Thanks for having the patience to let this little show go on. I've stayed with it partly out of my own repugnance at snow jobs, and partly to show what a typical Pom does when you disagree with one of them. So watch yourselves.
   

That even leaves me speechless with disbelief....  ??? ??? ??? ???

So being British is wrong now too, this is what all typical British folk apparently when faced with an American.

I wonder where that leaves Geezer?
Or any other non-Brits who have perfectly reasonable discussions with us 'Poms' on here?

I really don't know whether to laugh or feel sorry for you Matin, if I didn't know better I would say you were some spotty teenager with a chip on his shoulder.
 

Offline peppercorn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1466
    • View Profile
    • solar
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #57 on: 08/09/2010 14:30:51 »
Martin, this is getting worryingly close to nationalistic abuse.
Please try and refrain from sweeping statements about any group, national or otherwise - as it may end with you getting removed from the forum.

As for the fact that two parties are not in agreement on a forum is hardly news, is it?

I also have to wonder if repeatedly spouting Latin phrases is going to do much good in winning wider support for your arguments.  I would say it just seems pompous, but then I am a philistine Pom  :-X
 

Offline Variola

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1063
  • Everyone should beware of The Pox...
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #58 on: 08/09/2010 17:07:42 »
Quote
philistine Pom

Is that a new razor?? " The new POM razor from philistine, the best a Brit can get"  ;D

I can imagine the abuse I would get if I started on a Yank abuse rail here, I restrict myself to the abuse of Jimbob and the occasional verbal frisk up of Geezer  :)
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #59 on: 08/09/2010 17:35:15 »
Erm, perhaps we should lock this thread before it gets any more hostile?
 

Offline Variola

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1063
  • Everyone should beware of The Pox...
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #60 on: 08/09/2010 17:50:46 »
Hey I only said I was going to frisk you up!!!  :D
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #61 on: 08/09/2010 19:37:25 »
So far, Martin seems to have insulted the American chemical society, several people on this forum (including me), one of their supervisors, any number of researchers whose published results he disdains, and the population of the UK.

I can't speak for the rest of them, but my thoughts on the matter are clear enough.
I don't care. It's not just a matter of "sticks and stones...".
If the insults came from anyone who I felt had any credibility I might take them to heart.
As things are, it seems to me to be rather like having a 3 year old in the middle of a tantrum shouting "You are horrid and you smell of wee!".
It's not a particularly good state of affairs, but it's not worth getting upset about.

The science is well documented.
Plenty of examples exist of chemicals penetrating the skin in quantities large enough to have pharmacologically significant effects.
Martin calls these "big lie propaganda"

It seems that, based on just one test with one drug under circumstances where it might have been expected to fail anyway, he concludes that this is impossible.

He seems to have failed to understand some of the things he has quoted- for example the Merck manual article says that the skin keeps most things out.
That's really not the same as keeping everything out.

He claims we have been insulting him. Well, the limerick was a dig at his use of legal Latin rather than anything else.
I may have been a bit harsh in my criticism, but I'm not sure I said anything that was actually insulting. It's also fair to say that, since I never mentioned his profession, I didn't insult it.
 

Offline MartinTheK

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 135
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #62 on: 09/09/2010 05:34:20 »
Throughout the day I have wondered why I am so less tolerant of what many British people like to think of as "good manners". Why does it irritate me more lately?

Then, just now, those disgusting rats at BP ran another one of their revolting pieces of garbage that wouldn't fool a 7 year old. They run 5-6 times a day saying (a) BP isn't really British. (b) In any case they are innocent of any blame and (c) they are benevolent souls dedicated to putting smiles on the faces of the folksy Americans who have been the victims of this unfortunate act of God.

I could not puke enough.

Now I am not going to read whatever posts have recently been made, but I will leave you gentle readers with an observation which you are free to ignore. (Just as I could care less whether you spend your money on these #$%^%$ socks.)

My observation:
Unless you are actually meaning to be grossly offensive, when dealing with Americans over the age of four, think carefully before employing your usual talent for snotty, toffee-nosed repartee throughout the future.
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #63 on: 09/09/2010 06:58:27 »
Martin
The plot is over here with the nitric oxide discussion.

You seem not to have answered any of my points.
Have you found out what "most" means yet?

Incidentally, I see that you have failed to notice the role of the company whose kit actually failed and caused the oil spill.
BP, (headquartered in London, but formed by the merger of British Petroleum and the American Oil Company) so not entirely British, are legally responsible for the action of their contractor, Transocean.
Of course since Transocean is American, their failure can't be anything to do with the mess.
« Last Edit: 09/09/2010 07:04:14 by Bored chemist »
 

Offline peppercorn

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1466
    • View Profile
    • solar
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #64 on: 09/09/2010 10:27:16 »
"Now I am not going to read whatever posts have recently been made."
Martin, at least bother to read this bit:

Quote
Martin, this is getting worryingly close to nationalistic abuse.
Please try and refrain from sweeping statements about any group, national or otherwise - as it may end with you getting removed from the forum.
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #65 on: 09/09/2010 19:19:31 »
Wowsers!

Looks like Martin doesn't realize some of us are actually Americans.
 

Offline Variola

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 1063
  • Everyone should beware of The Pox...
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #66 on: 09/09/2010 21:15:14 »
Wowsers!

Looks like Martin doesn't realize some of us are actually Americans.

No true American would use the word Oxters....  ;D
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #67 on: 10/09/2010 08:01:02 »

No true American would use the word Oxters....  ;D

But where else would you put your NOX-SOX?

(OK BC - I know that's not quite chemically Kosher.)
« Last Edit: 10/09/2010 08:03:18 by Geezer »
 

Offline imatfaal

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2787
  • rouge moderator
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #68 on: 10/09/2010 10:10:31 »

But where else would you put your NOX-SOX?

(OK BC - I know that's not quite chemically Kosher.)

It might not be strictly kosher - but it's a great name.  copyright it quick; or just tell the company you'll give them a great name in exchange for a few pairs to try out over the winter.  perhaps we could get some geezer-anecdotal evidence on the efficacy of the NOX-SOX.
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #69 on: 10/09/2010 18:07:13 »
Since nitric oxide is slowly oxidised by air to NO2 and the mixed oxides of nitrogen are called NOx I think it's reasonable to call them NOx SOx or NOX SOX if you can't be bothered to find the subscript function.
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #70 on: 11/09/2010 18:47:17 »
I've done a deal with Variola. She's going to be sell them as:

"NOX SOX by POX"
 

Offline Bored chemist

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8667
  • Thanked: 42 times
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #71 on: 11/09/2010 20:55:22 »
Whoa! dude; that idea ROX.
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #72 on: 11/09/2010 22:31:32 »
Well, sometimes you just have to think outside the BOX.
 

Offline Hugh888

  • First timers
  • *
  • Posts: 5
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #73 on: 02/12/2010 06:50:59 »
"Summary research papers continue to flood the scientific journals and insights into the biological activity and potential clinical uses of nitric oxide (NO): a gas controlling a seemingly limitless range of functions in the body. Each revelation adds to nitric oxide's already lengthy resume in controlling the circulation of the blood, regulating activities of the brain, lungs, liver, kidneys, stomach and other organs.

The molecule governs blood pressure through a recently recognized process that contradicts textbook wisdom. It causes penile erection by dilating blood vessels and controls the action of almost every orifice from swallowing to defecation. The immune system uses nitric oxide in fighting viral, bacterial and parasitic infections, and tumors. Nitric oxide transmits messages between nerve cells and is associated with the process of learning, memory, sleeping, feeling pain, and, probably depression. It is a mediator in inflammation and rheumatism."
 

Offline CliffordK

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 6321
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • Site Moderator
    • View Profile
Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #74 on: 03/12/2010 04:49:17 »
So...  Is putting NOx into one's socks supposed to make a person funnier?
Perhaps another method would be to fill the socks with nitroglycerin....  just pay a bit of attention to the concentration.

It would be easy to test the transfer of the NO into the blood.

Nitrogen has 16 different isotopes, of which 2 of them are stable. 
Likewise, Oxygen has 13 different isotopes of which 3 are stable.

So, if one treated the socks with 15N 17O, then looked for an increased amount of 15N or 17O in the urine or blood, it would give the answer.

DMSO is supposed to cross the skin easily, and could potentially be a carrier for other meds (I assume "Thick Skin" is also included).

Anyway, I don't think I'd do it unless it was for specific treatment such as Diabetes, or perhaps prevention of frostbite for skiing or climbing.  And, even with that, one would have to be careful that it didn't have secondary effects such as causing hypothermia.
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Can nitric oxide-oozing socks boost blood flow?
« Reply #74 on: 03/12/2010 04:49:17 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums