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Author Topic: Why does the LHC need to run at minus 270 degrees celsius?  (Read 3822 times)

Offline thedoc

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Yeah, Gday.  I'm Greg from Australia.  I got a question about the Large Hadron Collider, I was hoping you could answer.  I'm curious about the temperatures that they run the experiments at.  Just wanted to know if you could explain why the temperatures are so low.  I think its around minus 270 degrees and also, how they get the temperature that low, and how they maintain it?
Asked by Greg, Australia

               
               Read the naked scientists answer here
               
            
« Last Edit: 19/01/2010 19:00:43 by _system »


 

Offline litespeed

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Why does the LHC need to run at minus 270 degrees celsius?
« Reply #1 on: 18/01/2010 18:32:22 »
The low temperatures are provided by liquid helium. The purpose of the low temperature is to induced superconductivity in the wires needed in the large electro magnets that accelerate atomic particles. Superconductivity simply means electrical resistance in the subject wiring is reduced to zero.

Without this reduction the electrical power required for the magnets would be impossible. Even if the necessary power were provided, the wires would melt from the resistance. Managing the liquid helium is a major problem. The LHC was set back many months by a failure in the system that led to large leaks of liquid helium, and the destruction of many of the super conducting segments.

I believe these segments have been replaced, but I do not know whether the LHC is yet fully operational.
« Last Edit: 18/01/2010 18:38:16 by litespeed »
 

Offline thedoc

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« Last Edit: 19/01/2010 19:00:43 by _system »
 

megh

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« Reply #3 on: 13/03/2011 08:50:18 »
my question is that why is lhc so huge at circumference as in its 27 km? what's the role of the huge area? cant protons gain the necesary energy by moving in a smaller circle?
 

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« Reply #3 on: 13/03/2011 08:50:18 »

 

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