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Author Topic: Do inanimate objects feel "wind chill"?  (Read 5629 times)

Offline CAT D8H

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Do inanimate objects feel "wind chill"?
« on: 19/01/2010 19:21:47 »
We all feel wind chill when outside in cold weather, but do things like engines exposed to cold winds suffer cooling below ambient air temperature?
No one i have asked has been able to answer this.
Any body help with this one pls?
Regards
« Last Edit: 23/01/2010 23:12:00 by chris »


 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Do inanimate objects feel "wind chill"?
« Reply #1 on: 19/01/2010 20:00:44 »
I believe they do. Obviously they don't "feel" anything, but the chilling effect moving air has on us is because the moving air carries away heat from our exposed skin more rapidly than when the air is still.

So, an object that is hotter than the ambient air will be cooled more quickly when the air is moving over it. This is just as well, otherwise the radiator in your car would not be able to dissipate the excess heat from the engine.

However, once the body reaches ambient air temperature, wind chill no longer applies.  Humans continue to feel the chilling effect, because our bodies try to maintain a constant temperature.
 

Offline graham.d

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Re: Do inanimate objects feel "wind chill"?
« Reply #2 on: 20/01/2010 13:09:09 »
Good answer Geezer. Another extra effect on humans is cooling due to evaporation of moisture from the skin, also enhanced by a moving air mass.
 

Offline Geezer

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Re: Do inanimate objects feel "wind chill"?
« Reply #3 on: 21/01/2010 02:36:43 »
Good point Graham. I would guess that evaporation will significantly increase the rate of heat loss from human skin, so the surface of an inanimate object at the temperature of a human would experience less wind chill than a human.

Presumably they factor in some rate of evaporation when they determine wind chill equivalent temperatures.
 

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Re: Do inanimate objects feel "wind chill"?
« Reply #3 on: 21/01/2010 02:36:43 »

 

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