The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Why does bending my neck down and up make my hands feel hot and cold?  (Read 4514 times)

DiscoverDave

  • Guest
(I post this topic sincerely, and people will probably want to try this at home, although I do not recommend it for older folks.)

Regardless of the positions of my arms and hands, when I flex my neck downwards as far as possible (so my chin tries to touch my chest), my hands (specifically the backs of my hands) feel unusually warm, and when I extend my neck upwards, the warm feeling vanishes and (the backs of) my hands feel unusually cool.  This phenomenon repeats indefinitely.  Why?


 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8134
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
Sounds similar to Lhermitte's sign, which is caused by either nerve or joint disease in the neck.
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Yup! That will do it.

I used to have terrible problems with my back, and also with my neck when I was younger. Latterly my back muscles would go into total spasm. I literally could not move. Went to a chiropractor for a while and that seemed to help.

Then, I took up skiing because our kids were of an age where that seemed like a good thing to do. It turned out to be great fun - did a lot in NY, NH and VT.

After I started skiing, the back problems completely disappeared. I don't ski so much anymore, but I find that if I don't walk a couple of miles every day, my back starts to act up again.

The moral of this story is, "It's a lot cheaper to go skiing than pay a chiropractor."

 

Offline RD

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8134
  • Thanked: 53 times
    • View Profile
Went to a chiropractor for a while

Bang goes your scientific credibility Geezer: here's a potted biog of its inventor ...

Quote
Palmer read medical journals of his time and followed developments throughout the world regarding anatomy and physiology. While working as a magnetic healer in Davenport, Iowa, he encountered a deaf janitor who he discovered had a palpable lump in his back. He theorized that the lump and his deafness were related. After a reported successful restoration of the man's hearing, it led to the beginning of Chiropractic history. His theories revolved around the concept that altered nerve flow was the cause of all disease, and that misaligned spinal vertebrae had an effect on the nerve flow. He postulated that restoring these vertebra to their proper alignment would restore health.

Palmer founded a school based on his work that would become the Palmer School of Chiropractic in 1897. By 1902 the school had graduated 15 chiropractors. In 1906, Palmer was prosecuted under the new medical arts law in Iowa for practicing medicine without a license, and chose to go to jail instead of paying the fine.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_David_Palmer


Quote
Some chiropractors oppose vaccination and water fluoridation, which are common public health practices. Chiropractors' attempts to establish a positive reputation for their public health role are also compromised by their reputation for recommending repetitive life-long chiropractic treatment. Within the chiropractic community there are significant disagreements about vaccination ... Most chiropractic writings on vaccination focus on its negative aspects, claiming that it is hazardous, ineffective, and unnecessary. Some chiropractors have embraced vaccination, but a significant portion of the profession rejects it, as original chiropractic philosophy traces diseases to causes in the spine and states that vaccines interfere with healing.
Early opposition to water fluoridation included chiropractors, some of whom continue to oppose it as being incompatible with chiropractic philosophy and an infringement of personal freedom.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiropractor#Public_health

Less vaccination and less fluoridation, the more disease, to be 'treated' with life-long chiropractic manipulation$.
« Last Edit: 29/01/2010 08:30:36 by RD »
 

Offline Andrew K Fletcher

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 2331
  • KIS Keep It Simple
    • View Profile
Hi Dave.

I found your post interesting. Have you read about Paolo Zamboni's discovery in people with ms? Google CCSVI, you will find this interesting and make a connection with the neck posture.

Could I copy and paste your post as a quote to another forum where I am dealing with posture and ms? I feel your observation will be very interesting for people over there.
http://www.thisisms.com/ftopict-9774.html

Andrew
 

Offline Geezer

  • Neilep Level Member
  • ******
  • Posts: 8328
  • "Vive la résistance!"
    • View Profile
Went to a chiropractor for a while

Bang goes your scientific credibility Geezer: here's a potted biog of its inventor ...

Quote
Palmer read medical journals of his time and followed developments throughout the world regarding anatomy and physiology. While working as a magnetic healer in Davenport, Iowa, he encountered a deaf janitor who he discovered had a palpable lump in his back. He theorized that the lump and his deafness were related. After a reported successful restoration of the man's hearing, it led to the beginning of Chiropractic history. His theories revolved around the concept that altered nerve flow was the cause of all disease, and that misaligned spinal vertebrae had an effect on the nerve flow. He postulated that restoring these vertebra to their proper alignment would restore health.

Palmer founded a school based on his work that would become the Palmer School of Chiropractic in 1897. By 1902 the school had graduated 15 chiropractors. In 1906, Palmer was prosecuted under the new medical arts law in Iowa for practicing medicine without a license, and chose to go to jail instead of paying the fine.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_David_Palmer


Quote
Some chiropractors oppose vaccination and water fluoridation, which are common public health practices. Chiropractors' attempts to establish a positive reputation for their public health role are also compromised by their reputation for recommending repetitive life-long chiropractic treatment. Within the chiropractic community there are significant disagreements about vaccination ... Most chiropractic writings on vaccination focus on its negative aspects, claiming that it is hazardous, ineffective, and unnecessary. Some chiropractors have embraced vaccination, but a significant portion of the profession rejects it, as original chiropractic philosophy traces diseases to causes in the spine and states that vaccines interfere with healing.
Early opposition to water fluoridation included chiropractors, some of whom continue to oppose it as being incompatible with chiropractic philosophy and an infringement of personal freedom.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chiropractor#Public_health

Less vaccination and less fluoridation, the more disease, to be 'treated' with life-long chiropractic manipulation$.

I came to the conclusion he was trying to eliminate the curvature of my spine by reducing the mass of my wallet.

It did actually help a bit, but only because it was flexing my back muscles. There are much less expensive ways to do that.

BTW, while any scientific credibility I had is now shot, I am flattered to hear that I ever had any  ;D
« Last Edit: 30/01/2010 07:29:23 by Geezer »
 

The Naked Scientists Forum


 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums
 
Login
Login with username, password and session length