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Author Topic: effects of blunt force trauma to certain parts of the body  (Read 3355 times)

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   I'm doing a science fair project on blunt force trauma to the liver, solar plexus, kidneys, sides and back of the neck, amount of force needed to break ribs, arms, and legs. Basically the title "what are the effects of certain parts of the human body" is just science for "why does it hurt and what happens when i get hit in certain places". I know what it feels like with the exception of broken bones, but i need professional advice on what is actually happening to the person when he is hit in those areas. All help is appreciated

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effects of blunt force trauma to certain parts of the body
« Reply #1 on: 11/02/2010 21:43:08 »
I'm actually a 5-year practitioner of goju style karate. and thank you for your information, this will not only explain what happens when you are hit but why horseplay is dangerous, and why it hurts when you fall or are injured in a sport in these areas.

also it's true, nobody....NOBODY!, expects a Spanish Inquisition lol

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effects of blunt force trauma to certain parts of the body
« Reply #2 on: 11/02/2010 22:34:05 »
I don't know, but i do know that Monty Python is amazing.

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effects of blunt force trauma to certain parts of the body
« Reply #3 on: 12/02/2010 00:54:14 »
This sounds like a lesson in how not to touch someone unless you really, really mean it.
 
Soft internal organs can rupture, and the spleen seems especially susceptible to this, and rupturing can cause severe internal bleeding and pain and, potentially, death. 

Fractured or bruised ribs are common injuries there, and a "flail chest" is a particularly dangerous conditions when at least two or three neighboring ribs fracture in two different locations, causing this unanchored portion of chest wall to move inward during inhalation and outward during exhalation.  The broken edges and the large movements can tear open the pleura sac enveloping the lungs, causing them to deflate, and you can easily die from internal suffocation if not treated professionally, so no one should view a "couple of cracked ribs" casually -- see a doctor immediately.

A strike to the back of the neck can cause the inner lining (ie, the intima) of the vertebral arteries to tear away and block the artery or move to the brain and cause an embolism there, which can also easily result in a fatal or near-fatal stroke.  This is called an "occlusion of the vertebrobasilar distribution system".  Years ago, chiropractors, osteopaths, etc sometimes used a particular (now prohibited) manipulation procedure to relieve neck pain, which could cause these occlusions.  In its heyday, this procedure caused about 1,000 minor strokes annually in the USA (dizziness, vomiting, tingling, partial numbness, blurred vision, weakness in a limb(s), etc), and about 100 full-blown strokes (the classic Wallenberg stroke {paralysis on one side of the face and the other side of the body}, paralysis and/or loss of sensation in one or more limbs, loss of balance, blindness, locked-in syndrome, etc), including 20 cases of death.  Annually.  If it was easy for medical experts to cause these problems using a "bona fide" procedure, it's all the more for you or a thug to do likewise.  So, that "cute" karate chop to the back of the neck shown in movies isn't so "cute".
how or why, does all this happen though?

 

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