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Online yor_on

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« Reply #75 on: 22/01/2011 08:02:45 »
An update on Julian Assange.

Well, it still stinks, even more so if this is true.
 

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« Reply #76 on: 22/01/2011 09:30:12 »
Let me cite this Swedish source "It's important to remember that Julian Assange stayed in Sweden forty days after the first accusation to clear his name. He was iterrogated by the police at that time. Yet he was allowed to leave Sweden double checking it with Marianne Ny through his lawyer.
---

"When Assange had left Sweden (his application for a residence permit was rejected) Ny decided to arrest him in absentia and applied to the Stockholm District Court to confirm her decision. The District Court granted her application and, after appeal, its decision was confirmed by the Svea Court of Appeal. However, even before the Court of Appeal had had time to examine the appeal, Ny issued a European Arrest Warrant against Assange."
--

Less well known is that this international arrest warrant was issued by M. Ny almost immediately after he had left Sweden, in his 'absence'."
==

Here you have a Google translation of an intern Swedish discussion about Julian Assange and the way our Swedish Justice system seemed to have worked. Amongst the comments is the one that two very competent Judges, with the first one (freeing Assange from the 'rape' accusations) being the one 'cleaning up' another recent Justice scandal disagreeing on the same grounds, and from the exact same documentation, as the second judge, now calling it 'rape', a serious crime that leads to prison. It's no little matter of difference here. A prison sentence or no sentence at all except,  for those, possibly, even creating false accusations against him.

"Let us, however, for the sake of argument assume that there are grounds for rape suspect. As two highly qualified prosecutors can make so radically different interpretations, the reason for the crime should reasonably be of a insecure, weak nature, that means, not a rape. And for such a one an arrest warrant, or an EAW can not be used.  A necessary condition for such, according to prosecutor himself, is that the reasons have to be serious (rape). That the non-existent grounds of suspicion against Assange and the rape accusation suddenly becomes justifiable, just by changing the prosecutors, seems like magic of the higher school. No explanations necessary apparently. The basis for the considerations being confidential for the district court, as well as for the Court of Appeal's. So we have no insight into the basis for the dramatic arrest warrant."

Here's the Original source.. Yeah I'm lazy, it's a 'Googled English.' but it's still possible to understand most of it I think.
« Last Edit: 22/01/2011 12:30:20 by yor_on »
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #77 on: 29/01/2011 07:06:04 »
Hehehe! Anarchy has overtaken the anarchists. (I'm sure they're being funded by the CIA)

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110129/wr_nm/us_wikileaks_exclusive

I'm setting up my own GeezerLeeks site as we speak. (BTW, the ISP is in Wales)
« Last Edit: 29/01/2011 07:13:05 by Geezer »
 

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« Reply #78 on: 29/01/2011 19:43:06 »
That marks it as a true revolutionary site Geezer.
I will follow you.

You're on twitter too?
==

I'm sure some of them will 'go commercial' too :)
Equal opportunity calls and all that..

I think I saw the mob creating one, somewhere?
Yep..
« Last Edit: 29/01/2011 19:45:48 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #79 on: 30/01/2011 07:55:36 »
It just gets better and better. Now Assagne is pissed because he has been "out leaked", by the Norwegians no less!!

I wonder if Assange is acting for the "common good", or is he just a nasty little money grubber?

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20110130/lf_afp/usdiplomacywikileaksnorwaymedia_20110130052025
 

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« Reply #80 on: 30/01/2011 14:30:24 »
Well, smoke and counter-smoke Geezer.

It will surely muddle the waters, especially if they post different angles. And as Die Welt in Germany, Svenska Dagbladet in Sweden and Politiken in Denmark all are right wing papers I'm sure they will.

Whoever thought out this angle did a pretty good job :)
And it will be interesting to watch.

I definitely doubt that those papers and Aftenposten are Wiki leaks 'partners' and if Julian said so it's another not thought through move from his side. As I said, a perfect Alpha male :)

And someone seems to be 'playing him' pretty well.
 

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« Reply #81 on: 30/01/2011 15:08:00 »
Reading up on it.


There is two possibilities here I think, just out of my head. One is eastern 'interests' wanting to embarrass USA, wanting to get their own hands on the documents, put up this wild cheme, to force Julian to deliver the documents to them too, which seems to have happened. Another ill-conceived move from Julian if so.

==
Ah, that build on us not knowing what they really got, if it's the same, or not, as what Wilki leaks have I better add. Otherwise it's a pretty unneeded thing to do, isn't it? But if it was a 'spin',  then it was pretty slick.
====

"Novaya Gazeta received unlimited access to the WikiLeaks database, which has a “wide range” of materials, including documents about Politkovskaya’s murder as well as information about Russian politicians’ ties to organized crime, Nadezhda Prusenkova, a Novaya Gazeta spokeswoman, said by phone from Moscow. The newspaper will start releasing materials next month. "

That as I find those papers 'to be or not to be' a primary western concern, and should have been kept here. I don't like the thought of sharing them with the whole world myself :) People will always say stupid things, just remember the fuzz about East Anglia and 'Global Warming', where some loose citations created a major Global warming scandal all over the world. And splendidly brought to you by FSB:s paid hackers.

"The Federal Security Service is (Russian: ФСБ, Федеральная служба безопасности Российской Федерации; Federal'naya sluzhba bezopasnosti Rossiyskoy Federatsii) the main domestic security agency of the Russian Federation and the main successor agency of the Soviet-era Cheka, NKVD and KGB."

The political overtones from sharing info this way put wiki-leaks in the red as I see it.

The other possibility is that it was a Western try for 'damage limitation', using right wing publications to spin their own view of what those documents was talking about. But considering what Wiki leaks now seem to have done I would say that it seem to have backfired badly, if so.

Can't say I'm pleased.

It sux bad time, and if that was Julian's choice, he's way over his head with that one. Doesn't change the way he was 'set up' from the beginning though, and I definitely have seen too many 'players' using those girls, and him, throwing 'mud' on him.

You need to be fair about that.

But now it seems like a situation where all 'sides' forces each other further and further out on the edge, or maybe off it.
==

There is a third possibility though. I've seen some unconfirmed reports that Aftenpostens documents comes from a Swedish paper? Very weird if so, but maybe someone inside Wiki-leaks is using the info for his own, or someone else's purpose? Some peoples stupidity & ego never stops to surprise me, so, why not?

I mean, the scapegoat is already delivered, isn't he? And as he's an Alpha male he will always find it important to look as if he was 'on top of it' whatever it may be. As I said, Alpha males may impress the unwary, as they often do in all public light. But to entrust them with long planning is plain stupidity.
« Last Edit: 30/01/2011 18:51:53 by yor_on »
 

Offline Geezer

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« Reply #82 on: 31/01/2011 08:17:40 »
http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/usinternetwikileaksassange

Er, didn't this used to be called blackmail?

He's a sad soul, and he has dug such an enormous hole that he really has no idea how to get out of it. Meanwhile, his former colleagues are abandoning him as fast as they possibly can.
« Last Edit: 31/01/2011 08:27:53 by Geezer »
 

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« Reply #83 on: 31/01/2011 11:17:00 »
Yeah, if that's a true content it sounds sad Geezer. But that's what people pushing and prodding produce, people believing the worst. If he truly believes that there is assassinations possible he will also believe that he have the right to 'defend' himself and whatever he thinks he's fighting for. As we all would if someone threatened our lives.

And as an alpha male he will build his 'vagnsborg' and there possibly 'fight it out'. And as I guess there are a lot of people wanting to read those documents still he will have a lot of supporters telling him that he is right in doing so, feeding this paranoia. Because, let's face it. It ain't that hard killing someone, it's harder to live in peace.

 

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« Reply #84 on: 31/01/2011 19:47:07 »
Paranoid or not, he better not show up anywhere near here. A lot of people in these parts have backhoes, and they are not afraid to use them  ;D ;D
 

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« Reply #85 on: 04/02/2011 00:27:13 »
Woops!

 

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« Reply #86 on: 04/02/2011 23:22:31 »
Sort of snowy I heard :)
Swedish weather huh..

And would that be a megalith stone?
Easter Island is it?

Anyway..

So you
 

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« Reply #87 on: 05/02/2011 00:28:02 »
By a remarkable coincidence, I just happen to have a large number of unused instant lottery tickets available at a heavily discounted price.
 

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« Reply #88 on: 05/02/2011 00:33:29 »
 

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« Reply #89 on: 11/02/2011 19:41:46 »
I liked the The Georgia Guidestones Gezzer :) Sweetly done.

And now for those of you enjoying, ah, some math?
 

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« Reply #90 on: 15/02/2011 19:53:43 »
Reading about Manning Julian Assange et al. You know, with governments trying to position themselves for and against wiki-leaks this is getting more and more muddled. Soon you won't be able to tell fact from fiction here. The problem with all 'political' leaks is that the government involved will find it potentially spying, so should people stop leak info about war-crimes? Refuse documentation? What if it had been Russia in Afghanistan instead, would the media had taken the same stance. Would you?


"In 2008, the U.S. Army Counterintelligence Center prepared a classified report (ironically leaked to and published by WikiLeaks) which -- as the NYT put it  -- placed WikiLeaks on "the list of the enemies threatening the security of the United States."  That Report discussed ways to destroy WikiLeaks' reputation and efficacy, and emphasized creating the impression that leaking to it is unsafe." From here The strange and consequential case of Bradley Manning, Adrian Lamo and WikiLeaks.

And it seems they've become prey for others too. Take a look here Palantir's & HBGary's outlining a proposal to Bank of America.. And here is the proposal.

On the surface it seems simple. Depending on where you live, and where your patriotism lies you you will choose a side. But for me it's also about 'freedom of information' Not letting governments and military get away with abusing human rights. You better think carefully about how you want our western community to work before deciding if wiki-leaks are good or bad. That Julian seems rather autocratic is clear, what I think of as a 'Alpha-male', but take a look here Daniel Domscheit-Berg's time as chief programmer and media spokesman.

Is it only me that gets a bad smell from this? That one seems far from clear. I would say that it looks like someone trying to make a fast buck, at the same time integrating himself with the 'Powers That Be.' Definitely no one I would trust with a whistle blower site, or any sort of sensitive information. :)

And lastly Bradley Manning Sounds like something from the Gulags that one if true, not what I expect from a western democracy.
 

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« Reply #91 on: 16/02/2011 07:19:10 »
Ever wondered how all those spammers could find you. And those marketing organizations. and ah, who knows?

"By creating a distinctive username—and reusing it on multiple websites—you may be giving online marketers and scammers a simple way to track you. Four researchers from the French National Institute of Computer Science (INRIA) studied over 10 million usernames—collected from public Google profiles, eBay accounts, and several other sources. They found that about half of the usernames used on one site could be linked to another online profile, potentially allowing marketers and scammers to build a more complex picture of the users."

Test you cognomen here.   

==

"Researchers are exploring ways that the traces of data that people leave on different websites and devices could be combined and used to track them. A 2010 paper showed that the online groups to which people belonged could be used to infer their real identity in 42 percent of cases. Another research team found that more than half of all smart-phone apps leak unique IDs that could be used to track a user's interests and, potentially, their location.

Building profiles of consumers using online information has already become a major industry for marketers as well as cybercriminals. Last year, for example, PatientsLikeMe.com, an online community for patients with life-changing conditions, caught marketing firm Nielsen scraping information from its users' posts."
« Last Edit: 16/02/2011 07:24:59 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #92 on: 20/02/2011 23:53:06 »
Maybe you've already seen it, but if you missed it? Or just want to remind yourself why you manage yourself?

'just fine thank you'.

Three parts.




==
« Last Edit: 20/02/2011 23:55:32 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #93 on: 25/02/2011 16:18:57 »
So, Julian Assange will be extradited?

I know, we all want to trust in the transparency of our western legal systems. Wouldn't it be terribly embarrassing if we were shown to be lead by elitist je**heads? Instead of legally elected 'servants of the state' protecting each persons right to a legal defense and a proper hearing?

Well, I don't trust the Swedish legal system any more :) They have fallen from our supposedly Swedish olympic heights of competence into the incompetent shadows of Lethe, trudging around like some corrupted maggots festering on what should be the law. Then again, how about the English justice system? Any better? So what do I make of it? Well, it's not my idea of a fair trail at least. Neither for Assange, nor Manning. They are trying to break down Manning by isolating him 24/7, and Assange in a more subtle way. Building up a storm of accusations without substance. That Swedish courts couldn't have heard Assange under the month he stayed in Sweden, while trying to clear his name is qualified BS. I would say the 'they', whoever that might be, wanted him to leave so that they could work up a case in splendid isolation. And me being a Swede, starting to hate that :)

Sh*, but it's hard to take when you see your legal system breaking down into politics, and ugly politics too. I think this case will become as famous as that of that French guy Alfred Dreyfus. And it sux bigtime to me, knowing that Sweden is the instigator of it. Or at least some really well placed Swedes. It stinks.

Now, we all know that western democracies are the sole believers in your right to free speech and thought, don't we? I mean, after all, isn't that what democracy is all about. That we all are the same in eyes of the law? Innocent until proven guilty? I would like to believe this to be true. Otherwise it becomes hard for me to differ our western democracies from those other, you know, the ones we find so questionable.

Okay.

Maybe we should start with what Wikileaks was, and still is.
The war on WikiLeaks: A John Pilger investigation and interview with Julian Assange

Then this too might give us an added insight in the problem of finding information.

1. Army of Fake Social Media Friends to Promote Propaganda.

How about Sweden then. Well we seem to back up on most of what I thought to be our constitutional rights (Grundlag). The right wing government is slowly adapting it to a very flexible instrument. Not so much protecting individuals, as the government itself it seems. But all of it in the name of protecting us citizens of course :) They deem us to need it, it's good for us, assumedly?

So do we have anything linking any Swedish players to 'foul play'?
Well, I looked around a little, didn't take me that long.

2. Anonymous Thwarts U.S. Business Plot Against Bloggers, Unions, Rights Activists.


3.Karl Rove, Sweden, and the Eight Major Aberrations in the Police Sex Crime Reporting Process in the Assange Case. By Naomi Wolf

4.Fredrik Reinfeldt "the Ronald Reagan of Europe," and Rove.

5. Billy McCormac, Karl Rove and Fredrik Andersson. AKA Karl Rove and his Swedish henchmen.

6.Karl Rove’s Swedish Connections: The Controversy And The Facts.

7.Does Sweden Inflict Trial by Media against Assange?

Well, you might find me biased here, but I don't think I am. I'm just expecting our democracies to hold to the ideals we believe us to stand for. If we can't hold to them when it's becoming 'uncomfortable'?

Do we really stand for them?

Bad taste in my mouth this one.
Last but not least. Bradley Manning Speaks About His Conditions.
 
 

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« Reply #94 on: 03/03/2011 14:51:00 »
Do you like to read?

It's a dying breed that reads just for pleasure those days it seems. How about a thread on free books etc that you can download and read? Some are old of course, but they still have their charm.


Like this one.
 

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« Reply #95 on: 04/03/2011 16:08:45 »
I'm going to be a tiny bit subversive now.

I don't know about you but I price my privacy. I'm getting awfully tired on all and everyone wanting all personal details before I can post, or just read. TNS is blessedly free from that kind of behavior, but most papers in Sweden seems to need your life's history before they will allow you to post, and I'm guessing they've picked up that behavior from sites outside Sweden. That as we are terrific copycats of international trends those days, the more commercial the 'better'.

I'm not saying that you should use it. I've never bothered myself, but it's sort of nice to know that it exist. bug me not. I won't vouch for it as I've never tried it, and as it's a 'com' site? Never the less  :)
« Last Edit: 04/03/2011 21:47:39 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #96 on: 05/03/2011 16:33:36 »
So, how do you protect your information?

First I want to ask you. How do you want your Internet? Locked up like China want it to be, or France, or any of our 'governments of the people' and governmental institutions, no one excluded in fact. Or do you want to get what you're searching for 'unfiltered', yourself being the judge of what you find good?

There are several answers here. You need to find your own. We don't want hard core criminals to use a free Internet for their own shady business, do we? But if stopping them will stop you too? How is it out in the street? Are they stopped there? Do you trust your police to be there? Would you want your own policeman walking beside you, protecting you, and watching, whatever you do? I don't think so. Most of us accept that life contains a multitude of good and bad, and sometimes it can be hard to see what's what too.

So how do you want your computer? Controlled by unique hardware identifying you on the Internet? One unique number for one unique computer. That was the idea behind IP numbers once, and that is what IP v4 wanted to implement but the Internet grew much too fast, so we invented the opposite instead, namely ways to bind a IP number to ports enabling you to use 'fake IP:s' behind your router, ISP etc. This makes your computer anonymous, more or less, at least harder to track. IP v6 is thought to go back to the original idea, one unique number for each hardware.

You really need to think of this, what do you want? Is the statement 'this is a democracy' a free passport for the government to be allowed to identify and follow your every move? There was one revolution recently made possible to 'time' by the use of SMS. In the Philippines, text messaging helped topple a government in 2001. Now most regimes fearing it has clamped down on SMS. The Mubarak regime clamped down on many forms of communication including the Internet, cell phones and SMS for example.

Tell me, in society where your every move is controlled, even if used only when the government find you breaking whatever laws it use, what do you call such a government?

Democratic?
Free?

Or a dictatorship?

Your choice.
« Last Edit: 06/03/2011 12:12:06 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #97 on: 05/03/2011 18:17:08 »
Let us assume that you don't find the idea of a government able to check your every move the one you treasure most? So, how about commercial interests then? After all, they have a legitimate interest in following your moves, helping them to streamline their production after your interests?:) And if they want to protect their software, why shouldn't it be legitimate to use those unique identifiers? Well, it is, it's only by you buying or not buying those products you can inform them of what the resistance to that sort of idea is.

And the reason? Well, if you were uncomfortable with governments doing it just before? Why do you expect it to be any better with a multinational company, using the same technology? A democratic government is at least expected to answer and listen to you, but, can you expect a multinational cooperation to do the same, and, how will you 'enforce' peoples views if they don't? They can be comfortably listed anywhere on Earth, doing business.

Intel tried to give each of their CPU:s unique identifiers some time ago, but found it very unpopular. Now they are trying again. Intel will implement OTP-generating capability into its 2nd Generation Core  'Sandy Bridge' processors. One called Insider, using hardware protected streaming of specific data to your computer, in essence checking if it's 'allowed'. and the other called Intel Identity Protection Technology (IPT). also there will be a remote control 'kill-switch' for the processor in cooperated, enabling the processor to be stopped in case of theft, primarily thought for laptops. I've never liked switches on my Computer controlled over the Internet myself, but? :) Maybe you do?

"1) Sandy Bridge's killswitch works even without the PC being powered on (over a 3G network)! All future Intel CPU's will be equipped with one.(Your chip could theoretically be compromised and turned off by a would be attacker, though unlikely)

2) Killswitch renders the cpu useless.

3) The new Sandy Bridge have DRM built inside the chip. It cannot be removed through software. As long as you have a Sandy Bridge CPU, you automatically have DRM that can't be removed.

4) DRM is an acronym for Digital Rights Management, a broad term used to describe a number of techniques for restricting the free use and transfer of digital content. DRM is used in a number of media, but is most commonly found in video and music files.

5) Many PC enthusiasts dislike DRM due to the problems associated in the past with software DRM. Many reports of issues with DRM in games, etc. have been reported, and the majority of consumers dislike it.

6) There is a debate about the KillSwitch and some security vulnerabilities. Taken from the 2nd link: "Definitely, this new feature is something to pay attention to, as potential vulnerabilities in the implementation can open the door to new remote attacks, starting with DoS.""

"When Intel launched Sandy Bridge it played up a technology called Intel Insider. This technology, which is not DRM even if it matches the definition, was sold as a way for Hollywood to deliver high definition content securely to PCs. The response was largely along the lines of “Hey Intel, 1999 called and wants its processor identification number back” but the reality was that Intel Insider is very different from the unique identifier in each CPU that Intel introduced then pulled from the Pentium III, even if Intel is staying quiet on the details.

However, while Insider remains mysterious the other technology in the process of being launched by Intel is a bit more transparent. It's Dubbed Intel Identity Protection Technology IPT. That manageability engine (ME), by the way, is on the same silicon as the Core processors' compute and graphics cores. And unlike Intel's vPro client-management technology, IPT is common to all three levels of the 2nd Geneneration processors: the Core i3, i5, and i7; vPro skips the i3. "We've taken the notion of a one-time password that generates a dynamic code every 30 seconds and we've embedded it into the chipset," Gilburg says, "into the [manageability engine] of the 2nd Generation Intel Core and Core vPro. This is brand new technology; Intel is the first to do this."

And finally "Gilburg thinks the number of participating OEMs will snowball. 'This year we're expecting a small subset of the machines hitting the market to have it. Next year it'll be a little more widely available. A year after that I think it'll become more widely pervasive." However, even if you buy a non-IPT-enabled PC before that snowball gets rolling, a simple firmware update can enable the IPT/OTP feature retroactively, should your PC vendor be so inclined.'"

The second and third groups of partygoers – enterprises and consumer websites – are already growing. In addition to Gilburg's examples of eBay and PayPal, Intel's Protected Sites web page lists 145 other sites protected by Symantec's OTP tech, VeriSign Identity Protection (VIP) Authentication Service, which was part of Symantec's $1.3bn acquisition of VeriSign's identity and authentication business last May. Once all those elements are in place – as Gilburg demoed to us – logging into an OTP-protected system is a simple matter of a one-time account setup – opt-in, of course – that provides the PC with a unique ID. After that setup, the Intel ITP technology in the PC's 2nd-gen Core processor negotiates with Symantec or Vasco software at the target website to work its OTP-security mojo.

"So think: 'username/password bad, adding dynamic code good'," Gilburg instructed us. To Gilburg, the need for building a dynamic-code OTP system into consumer PCs is obvious. "There's over 56,000 new phishing sites that go up every month," she says. "And why do they go up? Because they're successful." The rise of social networking is giving nogoodniks more opportunities to wreak havoc at the consumer level, Gilburg says. "It used to be just financial accounts, and people didn't care so much because the liability, in the US, is on the bank. So, yes, you feel violated; yes, it's horrible; but at the end of the day they're going to put that money back. But now, you take over my Facebook account and you send viruses to my thousand closest friends, and then it's your reputation that's damaged, and boy, that hurts a lot."

On the enterprise side, Gilburg cited a recent report by Forrester research – "sponsored by Symantec," she freely offered – that detailed username/password breaches. "Fifty per cent of the three thousand or so companies that they surveyed had admitted to breaches," she said, adding: "The key word there is 'admitted' – probably another 45 per cent actually had them." She also recounted a breach at Twitter's HQ: "About a year ago, Twitter was using Google Apps for all of their corporate application servers, etcetera, and someone hacked the admin account and exposed all of Twitter's financials and business plans. What are they going to do, change their business plans?"

Eventually, Gilburg believes, users will come to expect expanded security. "What we're hoping to create on the consumer side is a notion where users are looking for this protection, and if a site doesn't have it, they might think, 'Well, you know what, I'm going to avoid that site, because my security isn't being taken seriously'." After all, Gilburg says, "Identity theft terrifies people."

And if Intel, Symantec, Vasco, and others can allay some of that terror while making a tidy profit from doing so, well, isn't that the American Way?"

What scares me isn't 'identity theft'. Learning how to use your computer and the Internet it's quite simple to protect yourself from that. But allowing cooperations to build in remote control devices and tracking, that scare the sh* out of me :) and I don't even have anything to hide. How about you? Prepared to share your computer with those having the technology?

« Last Edit: 06/03/2011 00:39:41 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #98 on: 05/03/2011 21:12:41 »
Want to know a extremely simple way to protect your information? Public Key Encryption using open and private 'keys' (secure asymmetric key encryption). In reality uncrackable if you use over 256 bits encryption.

The idea is that every bit double the possibilities. e, g, 1 bit=2 possibilities either one or nul, 2 bit(2x2)=4, 3 bit(2x2x2)=8, so the next will be 8x2=16, then 16x2=32, 23x2=64, 128, 256 (a byte) and doubling. 127 bits are then approximately 1,70141183 × 10^38 possibilities and 256 bits are 1,1579208923731619542357098500869e+77 or 1,15792089 × 10^77.

You can read more about the principles behind Public Key Cryptography here. It can also be used to create virtual encrypted hard discs on your computer. Read more about Virtual hard disks here and other encryption software here Go down to the 'Free Public Key Encryption Software' listed. For example "GnuPG is Free Software, it can be freely used, modified and distributed under the terms of the GNU General Public License. Project Gpg4win provides a Windows version of GnuPG. It is nicely integrated into an installer and features several frontends as well as English and German manuals. Project GPGTools provides a Mac OS X version of GnuPG. It is nicely integrated into an installer and features all required tools."

Another simple way to insure it to be harder to crack your hard discs is to use the possibility Windows offer with EFS. "It works by encrypting a file with a bulk symmetric key. It uses a symmetric encryption algorithm because it takes a smaller amount of time to encrypt and decrypt large amounts of data than if an asymmetric key cipher is used." You do that by using 'explorer' and then choose the directory you want to encrypt in XP, although not that good, it will create he** after you wiped your hard disk, before giving it away for example, if someone want to reconstruct your data from it. But for a better virtual H-D use Truecrypts Virtual hard-disk.

When it comes to holes in your security the absolute biggest is your Browser. As long as it communicate with the Internet people will have the possibility to exploit you. So what you need to do is to minimize the risks. One simple way is to make sure to not open word and excel documents mailed to you automatically in their respective programs, as all basic code in that document automatically will be run as soon as you open it. In Firefox you check 'options' and then 'Applications' to set what the browser will use to open a application, as a word file with. Then you can choose WordPad for opening 'Word' files, as that one can't run any 'basic code'. Read this one for file-types handling in Firefox. You can set the same options in Internet Explorer too I presume (settings/control panel/Internet Opinions, not that I found it looking, or ever have used that one. If you do use it you can get some tips for securing it here. And finally, use some protection will you :) Firefox have some nice Add-ons that are quite useful. 'Addblock plus' and 'NoScript' for example. And a firewall, preferably as good as Zone Alarm, where you explicitly verify every connection the first time. That means that you set your firewall to ask you, and to not connect until you granted access. As you do it you can change that specific setting to 'automatic' which means it will not ask you the next time. Doing so you will learn what it is your computer use, Google if you don't know what it is it want to connect to, and with what 'service'.

Now, encryption is also possible to implement in Hardware. And would be very safe, but I still have to see any corporation using/creating such a chip for our private computers. If a corporation did then that would be the one I bought, guaranteed that it use open source-code for the chip so one could check it for back doors. If one used that between the 'rings' 0-too ??, used to differ what is the inner 'core' of a computer system 'untouchable', and what us users/programs can use/modify the virus makers of all kinds would find it real hard, impossible in fact, to infect that core, as long as the private key was properly restricted. But I don't expect anyone to do it, well, maybe NSA :) or their counterparts.

Anyway, what I've wrote isn't that difficult to implement. If you use a ISP that gives you a dynamic IP, changing every time you go up, then he's using IP bindings to port numbers giving you a automatic first 'hiding'. But as there still is the possibility of following that port number to your PC a firewall is very useful. Here are two nice ones Agnitum Outpost Security Suite Free. 89 MB. or ZoneAlarm 44.77MB (Non-Commercial Freeware). After installing you can test your security on Internet. Welcome to ShieldsUP. or at Audit my PC., or both for all that I know. ShieldsUP is the straightforward one though :) But try to secure your computer before doing it, please. Doing this, and using a free anti-virus, preferably not American as one professor once (KTH) told me that the NSA is said to have back-doors to all American ones, and, as a sober guess, FSB probably have it to its major Russian counterparts, still, after doing so you should be homefree. More or less that is, you also have IPSEC in windows if you want a 'over-course' as we say in Sweden, and a million ways depending on your Linux distribution. If someone really want to get to you though, social engineering will be your major problem. People having/getting physical 'access' to your computer that is :), or getting it illegally.

But then you probably knew all this already.
===

Thinking of it, I better give you some links to what you can do to secure the Widows OS.
Most for Win-XP but I expect you to be able to use most of them in W7 too. Vista ? Maybe, never liked that one anyway. As for the Linux gurus, you know what to do, I hope :). Check this first 10 services to turn off in MS Windows XP. You might also consider turning of remote desktop Help Session Manager in 'services' 'Administrative tools' too, that is if you don't need it. In 'Services' you will find a lot of stuff that gets started at boot to then just lie there using your system resources and opening for hackers. Here's a nice guide How To Turn Off Unnecessary Windows XP Services. But proceed with caution, although the worst that I expect to happen is that you will have to restart windows, in 'safe mode', to then restart whatever 'service' you closed down that caused your 'malfunction'. Never happened to me though, but who knows what you want to play with :) So read the guide before 'clicking away'.

1. Guide to Securing Microsoft Windows XP Systems for IT Professionals: A NIST Security Configuration Checklist
2. WindowsXP Tips.
3. A non-exhaustive list of the options available to XP Professional users through the Group Policy editor.
4. Just for fun, some Windows history.

Yeah, I liked W98, a lot :) and XP is okay too. I'm sure win7 is too, although I've no need for it.
But, Linux rules, it has all the ingredients Windows used to have, active users creating new software, and some truly sweet graphical user interfaces. And as for security, I think Windows still a far way behind what Linus implements in its software core.


« Last Edit: 06/03/2011 03:20:39 by yor_on »
 

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« Reply #99 on: 06/03/2011 12:38:49 »
Here here... I love linux!!!!
 

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