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Author Topic: restriction enzyme viruses?  (Read 3796 times)

Offline thebean

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restriction enzyme viruses?
« on: 11/11/2005 14:23:22 »
can phages be used to introduce large amounjts of restriction enzymes to a cells nucleus?


 

Offline Ylide

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Re: restriction enzyme viruses?
« Reply #1 on: 16/11/2005 11:30:04 »
There are two problems with what you've asked:

First, Phages don't really work like that.  They transfer DNA, not proteins (i.e. enzymes), when bacterial DNA is integrated into the phage genome.

Second, phages only attack prokaryotic cells, which do not have a nucleus.  

If you wanted to transfer a gene that codes for a restriction enzyme to a bacteria, that could probably be accomplished as long the viral DNA didn't have the sequence targetting by the host restriction enzyme.  





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Offline DrN

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Re: restriction enzyme viruses?
« Reply #2 on: 20/11/2005 23:04:10 »
scientists use viruses as vectors to introduce genes into cells, in order to make the protein, so in terms of modified viruses then yes, but perhaps not phages. adenoviruses and retroviruses are generally used. I don't know a whole lot about them though. I've heard of phagemids, used for introducing DNA into cells too, and I know they have something to do with phage's, but not sure how butchered they are.
 

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Re: restriction enzyme viruses?
« Reply #2 on: 20/11/2005 23:04:10 »

 

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