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Author Topic: Should life be introduced on Mars?  (Read 2903 times)

David Gould

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« on: 02/03/2010 12:30:02 »
David Gould asked the Naked Scientists:
   
I enjoy your podcast. I can't wait for more episodes.

Here's my question.

If scientists conclude that Mars is lifeless, will they decide to introduce life in order to terraform the planet?

Thank you,

David

What do you think?
« Last Edit: 02/03/2010 12:30:02 by _system »


 

Offline LeeE

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #1 on: 02/03/2010 14:27:29 »
I don't think that Mars can be terraformed, at least in terms of providing a breathable atmosphere, because lacking a magnetosphere, any atmosphere would be 'blown' away by the solar wind, which is what seems to have happened to Mar's original atmosphere.
 

Offline Robro

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #2 on: 04/03/2010 06:15:41 »
Space missions are regulated by governments mostly, and scientists don't have the final say as to how the funding will be spent. As far as missions to mars, the US doesn't even have the funding to replace the space shuttle with the Orion spacecraft to maintain the ISS. I can see cancelling the moon mission, we've already done that, but to cancel the whole program? Maybe this is a good thing and private industry will take over with a competitive market for human spaceflight. If this is the case, Mars may see boot prints someday in the not too distant future. Unless humans find a way to live in space free of the requirement of a planet, we will probably become extinct.
 

Offline josephine2

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #3 on: 08/03/2010 15:56:02 »
Der Benutzername oder das Passwort ist nicht korrekt !
 

Offline flr

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #4 on: 08/03/2010 22:20:34 »
 We are better to learn how to live in space autonomously in some ships, rather than terraform a planet.
 By living autonomously in space I mean to build a ship that has the following capabilities:
1) generate its own Oxigen water and food, without needing to visit a "supply planet" for years.
2) have a powerful magnetic shield to deflect the cosmic/solar rays
3) have sufficient on-board fuel to jump from start to star without need for refuel, or collect the fuel on-fly from some unknown to us physics (vacuum fluctuations).
 
 That sounds pretty much like "Entreprise" from Star-Trek.
 

Offline yor_on

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #5 on: 10/03/2010 12:53:28 »
Well I saw this documentary, at least I think it was a documentary with this crazy genius, well, he wasn't crazy at all, that built this indestructium rocket ship, well, I'm pretty sure that was what the 'metal'(?) was called that they took to the middle of the earth to kickstart the metallic core that had stopped to rotate?

As usual the military and the government was just liers though :(
 

Offline yor_on

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #6 on: 10/03/2010 13:03:32 »
Okay, stop screaming at me :)

I might have gotten it wrong here, but, how about it?
Terraforming Mars, sort of:)

With a few, well placed, atomic devices???
Putting a spin on it?
==

There will be some digging to do though..
And maybe one should bring a blowtorch, it may be stuck?

"Unlike Earth's core, which is partially molten (melted), the core of Mars probably is solid. Scientists suspect that the core is solid because Mars does not have a significant magnetic field. A magnetic field is an influence that a magnetic object creates in the region around it. Motion within a planet's molten core makes the core a magnetic object. The motion occurs due to the rotation of the planet. "
==

But otherwise I like my idea :)
« Last Edit: 10/03/2010 13:10:18 by yor_on »
 

Offline GlentoranMark

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #7 on: 10/03/2010 17:22:29 »
I'm sure we've already introduced bugs to the planet both by meteorites and by the spacecraft we've sent.

Terraforming may sound impossible but who knows what will be possible in the future. If we don't move off the planet, our species will either stagnate or be wiped by a meteorite.
 

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Should life be introduced on Mars?
« Reply #7 on: 10/03/2010 17:22:29 »

 

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