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Author Topic: Is this a new optical phenomenon?  (Read 3975 times)

Offline lucktiger2010

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« on: 13/03/2010 20:13:02 »
At the Babaoshan Revolutionary Cemetery in Beijing, mysterious Light Circles were captured by photographers on November 12th, 2009, at memorial ceremony in memory of Mr. Zhao Jinxiang, who originated the Chinese Soaring Crane Qigong.

Observing these photos with the Light Circles shot in the daytime, there are some distinguished features of these Light Circles. They can be captured against different backgrounds, in different directions, and across different time. Their sizes seem variable according to the different view of photo shoots. The edge of the Light Circles is clear and distinct. Objects inside look clearer, cleaner and shinier while is dimmer and darker outside.

In compare with the sunlight, Buddha’s Light, auroras and laser, it is shown that the Light Circle characterizes with many scientific phenomena which is beyond the current optical theories.

It is inferred that the mysterious Light Circle is a kind of new light source and new optical theory will have to be developed and applied on these new characteristics.

To let others to undestand this phenomenon, we made a PPT: newbielink:http://www.metacafe.com/watch/4284707/discovery_of_the_mysterious_light_circle_beyond_the_current_optical_theories/ [nonactive]


« Last Edit: 15/03/2010 09:39:14 by JP »


 

Offline RD

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Re: Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #1 on: 13/03/2010 20:33:01 »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vingetting

The vignetting is unusually sharply defined, and there is conspicuous chromatic aberration ...



So I'd say a wide-angle attachment lens is responsible for these effects.

If the camera had a separate viewfinder (i.e. not SLR) then the black corners would not have been visible to the photographer when the picture was taken. (Also true of cheap SLRs with an undersize mirror and prism, which do not show the full frame image in the viewfinder, e.g. Russian "Zenit"). 
« Last Edit: 13/03/2010 23:29:02 by RD »
 

Offline BenV

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Re: Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #2 on: 13/03/2010 22:46:24 »
Does he really mean the vignetting? Surely that's too simple and obvious, and noone would jump to the conclusion that what they're seeing defies current science?

The ppt link doesn't work for me, so I can't see what else he may mean.
 

Offline RD

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Re: Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #3 on: 13/03/2010 22:59:38 »
« Last Edit: 13/03/2010 23:25:31 by RD »
 

Offline BenV

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Re: Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #4 on: 14/03/2010 21:19:22 »
Wow.
 

Offline lucktiger2010

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #5 on: 15/03/2010 19:39:11 »
This phenomenon looks very similar to vignetting. But I have to declare here that we do not use any special lens.

I will bring more support documents to prove this.
 

Offline RD

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #6 on: 15/03/2010 20:10:16 »
What's the Chinese for "flogging a dead horse" ?
 

Offline Vincent

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #7 on: 16/03/2010 06:02:33 »
"Is this a new optical phenomenon?"

No it is not.

About a decade ago I was doing wide angle photograhpy pushing above the limit of the camera it would render such effect similar to the image as shown below.



See "Crop factor" that could illustrate how the circular effect would be caused if the aperture limit of the camera is overdone and "Ultra wide angle lenses" that shows how this effect is applied with optical rectilinear correction in photography.

Go get some ultra wide lens that is beyond your camera aperture limit and you can experiment this effect yourself to varying degree that depends on the lens used. An umatching camera lens hood could also render  vignetting effect that would appear to be similar with any over-the-limit wide angle shot.


« Last Edit: 16/03/2010 06:18:34 by Vincent »
 

Offline lucktiger2010

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #8 on: 16/03/2010 20:43:44 »
compare with the edges of circle between the photos we captured and vignetting effect. I think you could find that they are different.

From vignetting photos, you could find that it became darker near the edge than the center. But they looks same in the photos we captured.

there are more original photos:
newbielink:http://viewmorepics.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=viewImage&friendID=526629223&albumID=338021&imageID=1770561 [nonactive]
 

Offline RD

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #9 on: 16/03/2010 23:14:20 »
compare with the edges of circle between the photos we captured and vignetting effect.
I think you could find that they are different.


                                                                                                      http://etischer.com/flashtest/DSC01812.jpg

SNAP !
« Last Edit: 16/03/2010 23:28:21 by RD »
 

Offline lucktiger2010

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #10 on: 17/03/2010 16:12:12 »
From vignetting phenomena, we can find that it is clear and bright in the center and then fade off at edges. That means it become darker when nearer to the edges. From the following photo, it is obvious that A is brighter than B, B is brighter than C, C is brighter than D. I think it is true since there is less beam captured by the camera when nearer the edges.



Then if you check the following photo, you could find the brightness of A is as same as B. That means it does not fade off inside the circle.



There is another difference is that the edges(borders) of the circle. The edges of circle in vignetting phenomena are a little illegible and thin. But from B, C and D in our photo, you could find that the edge is very clear and thick. Who can explain this?
« Last Edit: 17/03/2010 16:14:29 by lucktiger2010 »
 

Offline JP

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Is this a new optical phenomenon?
« Reply #11 on: 17/03/2010 16:47:04 »
From vignetting phenomena, we can find that it is clear and bright in the center and then fade off at edges.

Did you look at RD's last post?  His image has a nearly identical effect to yours, and it's due to vignetting.  Also, see the discussion of mechanical vignetting here: http://toothwalker.org/optics/vignetting.html#mechanical  That picture is also very similar to yours.
 

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