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Author Topic: What lies betwen the molecules in our atmosphere?  (Read 1928 times)

Offline greenslime

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When I was learning about physics I was told that a Solid had molecules which were really tightly packed together, a liquid had molecules that were quite loosley packed together and gas molecules move around freely. So, in a gas, what is the space called inbetween these molecules? Since these molecules can move freely around and no other molecules stop them, is the gaps where they can move just a vacuum or other molecules or just nothing?





Mod edit - formatted subject as a question
« Last Edit: 16/03/2010 18:15:32 by BenV »


 

Offline acsinuk

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What lies betwen the molecules in our atmosphere?
« Reply #1 on: 17/03/2010 08:31:30 »
I think your question is; what lies between the gas molecules nucleus and the outside of the electron shell?  A very tricky question; look up alternative electric universe on the web part 2x attempts to probe that question.

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Offline Bored chemist

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What lies betwen the molecules in our atmosphere?
« Reply #2 on: 17/03/2010 18:49:39 »
The simple answer is nothing; a vacuum.
The properties of the vacuum are a bit more complicated.
 

Offline EatsRainbows

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What lies betwen the molecules in our atmosphere?
« Reply #3 on: 20/03/2010 09:22:23 »
" Everything is made out of atoms" is incorrect, true?

I don't think so because the alternative is saying something is made out of nothing and thats not really possible is it?

That 'nothing' area between atoms is frequently an important part of a molecule and can't just be taken by something without that something having the right properties, ie charge. For eg if you stick something in a bowl of water, if it is insoluble in water (due to the charge of its atoms) then it will form a solid within the water and the water molecules will shift out of the way to make room for it causing the bowl to overflow. Even if this something is soluble the molecules still shift to make room for the addition and bowl overflows. If the space was really 'nothing' then the water would become more dense rather than overflowing no?

So what I mean by that essentially is that the fact molecules have spaces between them doesn't change the fact that everything is made of atoms. Its either atoms or space between atoms, the space being a result of the way they interact which doesn't make the spaces insignificant. Water can't be water and not have a space, if no (or smaller) space its ice.

Mass is neither created nor destroyed and I'm pretty sure that due to gravity (and possibly a lot of other things i know nothing about!  :P) the dimensions of the universe are also fixed, so you're only ever going to be moving atoms and spaces between them around.

This post may call to be deleted after someone who knows what they're talking about adds something lol Well it was fun trying to explain anyway  ;)
« Last Edit: 20/03/2010 09:51:39 by EatsRainbows »
 

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What lies betwen the molecules in our atmosphere?
« Reply #3 on: 20/03/2010 09:22:23 »

 

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