The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists Forum

Author Topic: Cheese  (Read 3301 times)

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Cheese
« on: 19/11/2005 13:46:45 »
Why does it lose its flavour when you cook it? I've got some super-whizzo extra strong cheddar & just had some on toast. It was nowhere near as strong as when I eat it uncooked.


 

Offline neilep

  • Withdrawnmist
  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 20602
  • Thanked: 8 times
    • View Profile
Re: Cheese
« Reply #1 on: 19/11/2005 14:34:25 »
That is so weird !!..I too am a lover of eye-wateringly-mind-numbingly-collar-loosening strong cheese and have noticed the very same thing....and yet...when I cook with my wifeys as-mild-as-a-fainting-fairy-cucumber strength cheese I tend to find that it seems to increase in flavour!!...what's that all about ?

Lets hope a passing -cooking-with-cheese expert passes by and comments.

Men are the same as women.... just inside out !!
 

Offline Simmer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 229
    • View Profile
Re: Cheese
« Reply #2 on: 19/11/2005 20:49:36 »
Funnily enough I was discussing this very topic with the professor emeritus of toasted cheese and former head of the Welsh-Rarebit Department at Cardiff University.  He didn't know either. :D

Maybe the strong flavour is due to volatile (or thermally labile) byproducts of the maturing process?  Mind you that doesn't explain why mild cheese tastes stronger [:I]
 

Offline DrN

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 815
    • View Profile
Re: Cheese
« Reply #3 on: 20/11/2005 22:32:30 »
like garlic, and onions. they lose their flavour too (thankfully!) I'm not suggesting that cheese belongs to the same family as garlic though. must be something to do with heat changing the chemical composition of whatever it is that produces the flavour I would guess.
 

sharkeyandgeorge

  • Guest
Re: Cheese
« Reply #4 on: 03/12/2005 18:48:49 »
perhaps it has some thing do do with the fact cheese is stuffed with bacteria kill the bacteria kill the flavour

Giggidy Giggidy Goo
The philosopher Q man
 

Offline DoctorBeaver

  • Naked Science Forum GOD!
  • *******
  • Posts: 12656
  • Thanked: 3 times
  • A stitch in time would have confused Einstein.
    • View Profile
Re: Cheese
« Reply #5 on: 04/12/2005 02:31:20 »
quote:
perhaps it has some thing do do with the fact cheese is stuffed with bacteria kill the bacteria kill the flavour


That doesn't explain why weak-flavoured cheese tastes stronger when cooked
 

Offline ukmicky

  • Moderator
  • Neilep Level Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3011
    • View Profile
    • http://www.space-talk.com/
Re: Cheese
« Reply #6 on: 04/12/2005 04:35:55 »
Maybe as its heated the flavour rises and concentrates at the surface. So if you were to scrape the surface off and ate the part underneath as a test it should taste weaker, if I'm right.  :)

DISCLAIMER. its me, need i say more:D

Michael                                      
 

sharkeyandgeorge

  • Guest
Re: Cheese
« Reply #7 on: 10/12/2005 14:21:21 »
perhaps its to do with the fact that cheap cheese supermarket chedder for example has already been pasturised and so cooking has a diffrent effect on it than say a rather nice alive brie

Giggidy Giggidy Goo
The philosopher Q man
 

The Naked Scientists Forum

Re: Cheese
« Reply #7 on: 10/12/2005 14:21:21 »

 

SMF 2.0.10 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines
SMFAds for Free Forums