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Author Topic: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?  (Read 5930 times)

ROBERT

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Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« on: 05/12/2005 12:44:53 »
When stem-cell researchers are trying to obtain funding they list the diseases which they claim this technology could cure. They include autoimmmune diseases such as Diabetes (type1) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS).
In autoimmune disease the immune system mistakenly attacks indigenous tissue as if it were a foreign transplant.
If say a Type1 Diabetic person received replacement insulin-producing cells, derived from stem-cells, which were genetically identical to their original cells, surely their faulty immune system would destroy these identical replacements just as it did the original cells.

Would it not be necessary to cure autoimmune disease before tissue damaged by autoimmunity could be repaired by genetically identical replacements, derived from stem-cells?.
« Last Edit: 05/12/2005 12:46:10 by ROBERT »


 

Offline DoctorBeaver

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #1 on: 05/12/2005 12:59:51 »
Interesting question. My knowledge in this area barely raises its head above the parapet of non-existancy.
Obviously, the question is why the immune system attacks indigenous cells. Is it a) a fault with the immune system or b) do some cells change in some way that makes them unrecognisable to the immune system thus prompting an attack?
I think I'm right in saying that lymphocytes can also be grown from stem cells. If that is indeed the case then in a) above, using stem cells to replace the faulty lymphocytes in the body would alleviate the problem.
 

another_someone

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #2 on: 08/12/2005 16:20:34 »
Like DoctorBeaver, I know not a lot about the subject.

I do know that many of the early experiments have not proved their original promise, and very possibly for the reasons you say.

On the other hand, many of the diseases for which stem cell research is quoted as a possible therapy are diseases of old age, and thus one might see reasons why introducing juvenile cells might seem like a logical path to follow.

At any rate, whether or not stem cell therapy proves to be efficacious, the underlying research should provide a lot of new data that could point the way to new therapies, both for the diseases of old age, but also for improving the healing processes of the body.
 

ROBERT

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #3 on: 09/12/2005 14:25:30 »
I was not disputing that stem-cells are worthy of research and seem to have the potential to repair some types of tissue damage.  
However, it seems dishonest for stem-cell researchers to mention autoimmune diseases when trying to obtain funding if their technology could not benefit sufferers of autoimmune diseases.
« Last Edit: 09/12/2005 16:42:15 by ROBERT »
 

ROBERT

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #4 on: 19/12/2005 13:13:15 »
Apparently some stem-cell researchers are particularly "dishonest":-
BBC News: Thursday, 15 December 2005, 16:47 GMT  

"cloning pioneer has admitted fabricating results in key stem cell research, a colleague claims"

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/4532128.stm
 

another_someone

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #5 on: 19/12/2005 19:09:57 »
quote:
Originally posted by ROBERT

Apparently some stem-cell researchers are particularly "dishonest":-
BBC News: Thursday, 15 December 2005, 16:47 GMT  

"cloning pioneer has admitted fabricating results in key stem cell research, a colleague claims"

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/4532128.stm



Unfortunately, there is nothing unique to stem cell researchers in that regard.  Submitting false data is as old as science, and relates to all fields of science.  It is, in principle, no different to drug taking in sports, simply a result of people who break under pressure and take the easy route to winning.

What I think is more commendable is that Dr Hwang was willing to own up to his error of judgement.
« Last Edit: 19/12/2005 19:11:20 by another_someone »
 

Offline chris

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #6 on: 21/12/2005 10:29:01 »
quote:
Originally posted by ROBERT

When stem-cell researchers are trying to obtain funding they list the diseases which they claim this technology could cure. They include autoimmmune diseases such as Diabetes (type1) and Multiple Sclerosis (MS).
In autoimmune disease the immune system mistakenly attacks indigenous tissue as if it were a foreign transplant.
If say a Type1 Diabetic person received replacement insulin-producing cells, derived from stem-cells, which were genetically identical to their original cells, surely their faulty immune system would destroy these identical replacements just as it did the original cells.

Would it not be necessary to cure autoimmune disease before tissue damaged by autoimmunity could be repaired by genetically identical replacements, derived from stem-cells?.



Deara Robert

thanks for an excellent question.

You'absolutely right. It's one thing to repopulate an organ with stem-cell derived healthy cells, but another to prevent history repeating itself and the immune system taking those down too.

But the guys who work on stem cell technology are not the same people that work on autoimmune diseases and their control.

The idea is that science is multi-stranded and we solve the problems in small parts and then unite those parts to achieve something bigger. So whilst one group of researchers are tackling how to sort out why the immune system triggers MS or diabetes, another are sussing out how to replace the damaged tissue when we're in a position to do this.

If we didn't work like this is would take forever to discover anything. It would be like not working on the development of a car engine until you had perfected the fuel - without one you can't have the other !

Chris

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ROBERT

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Re: Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #7 on: 10/01/2006 13:27:42 »
While investigating this topic I discovered that some (type 1) diabetics have been cured using transplanted insulin producing (islet) cells, either from cadaver or living donor:-

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/3805603.stm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/4236873.stm

Cloned stem-cells were not necessary, however hazardous life-long immune suppression is usually required to prevent rejection of transplanted tissue.
« Last Edit: 13/01/2006 11:02:03 by ROBERT »
 

Offline qazibasit

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Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #8 on: 13/06/2008 11:43:17 »
well still a research is going, but its not the stem cells. they are basically the totipotent cells and not the stem cells. but still one cant say that it is possible anytime soon.
 

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Could stem-cells repair autoimmune damage?
« Reply #8 on: 13/06/2008 11:43:17 »

 

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