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Author Topic: What makes outer space super cold?  (Read 13388 times)

Offline jsaldea12

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #25 on: 07/04/2010 07:19:30 »
Kindly permit me …the present temperature measurement refers to measurement of molecular movement which radiates heat energy. But spacetime is not molecular, it is massless, indivisible skein/fabric of outer space, has no movement of the molecules, thus it has not the characteristic radiating heat energy of molecules. Spacetime of Dr. Einstein is vacuum, such vacuum, absence of molecules, has inherent cold property, spacetime is missed in the consideration of  measurement of all-encompassing temperature..


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Offline Geezer

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #26 on: 07/04/2010 08:28:14 »
In the absense of thermal energy, everything (yes, everything) will eventually drop to a temperature of 0K (Zero Kelvin)

Can you propose an alternative?
 

Offline BenV

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #27 on: 07/04/2010 10:57:09 »
Spacetime of Dr. Einstein is vacuum, such vacuum, absence of molecules, has inherent cold property, spacetime is missed in the consideration of  measurement of all-encompassing temperature..
I disagree.  You seem to understand that heat is a property of molecular movement, but then want to claim that cold is a property of spacetime.  It's not.  It's an absence of heat.
 

Offline yor_on

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #28 on: 08/04/2010 02:12:38 »
I think you might be discussing what 'energy' would be Jsaldea?
And if an absolute 'nothing' like a 'perfect vacuum' then would be consisting of no 'energy'?

If you look at it that way there is no such thing as a 'perfect vacuum' as observed by those 'Rindler travelers' versus those at rest with their origin. Then it more seems like some weird dimensional 'Russian dolls'. You know, the ones where you will find one inside one, inside one, ad infinitum. And what seems to define that vacuum is either your speed(?) or does it have to be velocity? Nah, I think speed will suffice for it, aka motion, and mass.

It's very strange :)
 

Offline jsaldea12

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #29 on: 08/04/2010 09:01:44 »
Does monopole exists in the universe? Not even LHC can create one. The unwritten law of the universe is the law of opposite, always the two sides of everything: positive-negative, south pole-north pole, for every action, there is corresponding reaction, HEAT-COLD, etc.

Observe a bar magnet: one side is positive, the opposite side is negative. But it does not mean there is no positive in the negative side of the bar magnet, as well as it does not mean there is no negative in the positive side of the bar magnet. Cut both ends of bar magnet, and each cut bar has positive and negative! Meaning both positive and negative properties intersect one another but the positive property is prominent in the positive side of the bar magnet. while the negative property is prominent in the negative side of the bar magnet. Such, too, is the complete, balance interpretation of heat property and cold property, positive and negative, respectively. This is how the Kelvin temperature measurement is arrived but ONLY THE HEAT PROPERTY is measured, from billion Centigrade down to closest OK. The Cold property is entirely missed in the Kelvin temperature measurement.. Cold property measurement should have been from down OK to up the billion centigrade.

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Can I suggest an alternative? The present Celsius temperature measurement is tailor-made. No need to change. Simply just to recognize that cold property exists, just like heat property. Both are intersecting energies on opposite directions., balance on middle, re-equilibrium  0.C , one side moving up is heat property, positive sign, the opposite side moving down is cold property, negative sign.


Thus, the definition of temperature is complete.


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Offline jsaldea12

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #30 on: 08/04/2010 09:09:03 »

   
Slight clarification:

.
Can I suggest an alternative? The present Celsius temperature measurement is tailor-made. No need to change. Simply just to recognize that cold property exists, just like heat property. Both are intersecting energies on opposite directions., balance on middle, re-equilibrium  0.C , one side moving up is domain of heat property, positive sign, the opposite side moving down is domain of cold property, negative sign.


Thus, the definition of temperature is complete.


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Online Bored chemist

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #31 on: 08/04/2010 09:49:22 »
Does monopole exists in the universe?




Jsaldea12

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Yes, the earth's gravitational field can be modelled quite well as being a monopole.



Incidentally, the opposite of cold isn't "heat", it's "hot".

You can't add or subtract "hot" from something but you can make a thing hot or cold by moving heat to or from it.

I can work out how much heat there is in something, but the question of how much hot or cold it has isn't defined.

 

Offline JP

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #32 on: 08/04/2010 10:07:36 »
Does monopole exists in the universe?




Jsaldea12

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Yes, the earth's gravitational field can be modelled quite well as being a monopole.

Electric monopoles exist as well.   A single charge, for example.
 

Offline jsaldea12

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #33 on: 08/04/2010 13:07:31 »
Please permit me, correct me if needee be: …Electric flow consists of electrons that gives electrical light, such electron flow on two electrical lines, re-positive and negative line. Proton consists of quarks which has positive and negative. Earth gravitational field is not monopole,  there is a reason why gravity on earth is all attraction, please refer to posted article, “Why is gravity all attraction toward earth”.

But what do you agree with the suggestion? Is that plausible?


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Offline BenV

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #34 on: 08/04/2010 14:08:51 »
Earth gravitational field is not monopole,  there is a reason why gravity on earth is all attraction, please refer to posted article, “Why is gravity all attraction toward earth”.

That would be the thread where you refused to listen to what people were saying, ignored facts and stuck with your fantasy ideas about physics?
 

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #35 on: 08/04/2010 16:41:00 »
Please permit me, correct me if needee be: …Electric flow consists of electrons that gives electrical light, such electron flow on two electrical lines, re-positive and negative line. Proton consists of quarks which has positive and negative. Earth gravitational field is not monopole,  there is a reason why gravity on earth is all attraction, please refer to posted article, “Why is gravity all attraction toward earth”.

But what do you agree with the suggestion? Is that plausible?


Jsaldea12

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Of course we don't agree with it, nor is it plausible as we have pointed out at some length in that thread; it's total cloud-cuckoo-land.

Why don't you accept it?


There's no point starting a post with "Please... correct me..." if you have absolutely no intention of accepting that you are still utterly wrong.
 

Offline jsaldea12

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #36 on: 09/04/2010 04:00:42 »
I like to think that the category  I am posting is  “New Theories”.  ..that what I have posted is not in the mainstream of physics, rather, it is pioneering of physics..it is new theory.

Science is evolving, what concept we had centuries ago are being replaced, keeps o changing,developing, etc.  Centuries ago, the concept was that atom was the ultimate, the  indestructible, then it was found that it consists of electrons and protons/neutrons, then further found in modern time that proton is composed of quarks with three colors, representing positive and negative, also found that electrons has positive positron. There is even a very respectable scientist who claimed that electron is baryon…and you know what is baryon. (I agree as a new theory) Becaue electrical charge can go one direction ad the opposite direction, meaing it is intersecting, but it is direction that  makes it positive in one direction and negative in opposite direction. Not only electrons are in such electrical current but protons. But more important is something fundamentally the same between magnetism and electricity, like coin with two sides, thus, the principles  are the same. Something new? Just new theory..

Lastly,…give me some latitude, some time to keep up, …but don’t say I don’t know physics. It is like water to a duck to me.

Jsaldea12

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Offline JP

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #37 on: 09/04/2010 04:47:17 »
Actually, you posted it in the Physics and Astronomy section.  I moved it to new theories: http://www.thenakedscientists.com/forum/index.php?topic=30887.0

Bringing up new theories is fine (provided you post them in the proper section of the forum), but this is a science Q&A forum and and completely ignoring discussions of actual science while proposing fantastic ideas that have no grounding in reality will get your threads locked. 

Since this has turned into an advertisement for your previously locked thread "Why is gravity all attraction toward earth," I am locking it as well.
 

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What makes outer space super cold?
« Reply #37 on: 09/04/2010 04:47:17 »

 

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