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Author Topic: Thank you Kat?  (Read 4674 times)

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Thank you Kat?
« on: 24/03/2010 06:01:52 »
Thank you Kat for giving the American name for some of the stuff you're talking about.

I found some really good cookies (biscuits) that are ginger with lemon cream filling. On the box it says "Authentic English tea cookies" but this can't be true. If the were really authentic wouldn't they be "tea biscuits"? I think I'll keep getting them dispute the lies on the package because they are really really good.

Ok now if we can just get Dave and Chris to lay off the bad puns....But maybe it's just "English" to tell bad puns. Probably the REAL reason we rebelled in 1776 ::)


 

Offline rosy

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Thank you Kat?
« Reply #1 on: 24/03/2010 10:46:55 »
Actually, the English use "cookies" to describe quite a specific subset of "biscuits". The squishy, over-sweetened ones sold by American coffee shops and (these days) just about everyone else as well.
 
Of course, "biscuit", meaning in French "twice cooked" is actually originally a term for what the Italians, or at any rate pseudo-Italian coffee shops in the UK (I don't actually know any Italian, and have never been to Italy to check) call "biscotti".

Sorry, English is a dreadful muddle of words collected from other languages, and has evolved differently in many different countries. Your banging on, and on, about wanting the TNS team to use "American friendly" language is getting a bit dull. If you really don't understand, look it up. Or ask here. Would you like them to explain the words used that don't feature in Australian English explained too? How about South African English? How about Indian English? Or would you rather some time was left to discuss science and you got your international vocabulary widened a little? See it as an extra opportunity to learn something!
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Thank you Kat?
« Reply #2 on: 24/03/2010 23:54:25 »
Actually, the English use "cookies" to describe quite a specific subset of "biscuits". The squishy, over-sweetened ones sold by American coffee shops and (these days) just about everyone else as well.
 
Of course, "biscuit", meaning in French "twice cooked" is actually originally a term for what the Italians, or at any rate pseudo-Italian coffee shops in the UK (I don't actually know any Italian, and have never been to Italy to check) call "biscotti".

Sorry, English is a dreadful muddle of words collected from other languages, and has evolved differently in many different countries. Your banging on, and on, about wanting the TNS team to use "American friendly" language is getting a bit dull. If you really don't understand, look it up. Or ask here. Would you like them to explain the words used that don't feature in Australian English explained too? How about South African English? How about Indian English? Or would you rather some time was left to discuss science and you got your international vocabulary widened a little? See it as an extra opportunity to learn something!

You make an extremely good point. I like language and the history of language. How words tend to change their meaning over time, and how often words are made up by writers.
 

Offline rosy

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Thank you Kat?
« Reply #3 on: 25/03/2010 23:15:50 »
On the words made up by writers front, I heard it said once (no idea whether the source was reliable) that Shakespeare made up more words than anyone else. It made me wonder whether the amount of trouble some people seem to have in making sense of his plays (especially when forced to study them in school, as in the English system), is a function of archaic language, or of the fact that lots of the words were invented for a particular scene and never caught on.. but I've never studied Shakespeare's contemporaries to see if there's a detectable differencxe. Plus of course lots of Shakespeare's words have probably become stuck in the language, maybe even squeezed other words out of regular use, because so many people have read and quoted Shakespeare.
But I'm a chemist not a lit student. so I don't know that I read text sufficiently analytically to notice one way or another.

Sorry for being grumpy before, incidentally...  :-S
 

Offline Eric A. Taylor

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Thank you Kat?
« Reply #4 on: 29/03/2010 14:48:34 »
No worries. Do you find it incredibly ironic who "weird" is spelled. It violates the "i before e" rule. "Weird" is spelled weirdly!!! (I think it's Arabic in origin)
 

Offline neilep

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Thank you Kat?
« Reply #5 on: 30/03/2010 11:12:40 »
I'd like to thank Kat too...thank ewe Kat.
 

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Thank you Kat?
« Reply #5 on: 30/03/2010 11:12:40 »

 

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