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Author Topic: copper and magnetic jewlery  (Read 6828 times)

Offline Son of Jupiter

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copper and magnetic jewlery
« on: 13/12/2005 18:15:48 »
Is there any benefits for wearing copper or magnetic jewelry?

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #1 on: 13/12/2005 21:42:07 »
This was discussed on a program I was listening to the other day (it may even have been The Naked Scientists). There is no clinical evidence to show that they serve any purpose. All the evidence that there is appears to be anecdotal. However, and this is also anecdotal, my uncle had rheumatism and started wearing a copper bracelet. His condition certainly improved markedly.
 

Offline Simmer

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #2 on: 14/12/2005 07:52:08 »
On the other hand he probably believed it would help, otherwise why buy one, so it could be a placebo effect.  

Ideally a statistically significant random sample of rheumatism sufferers should be rounded up and forced to wear them. :D
 

Offline Soul Surfer

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #3 on: 14/12/2005 09:05:45 »
Any effect is almost totally placebo effect particularly for magnetic ones because although blood does respond to magnetic fields the bracelet's magnetic effect is extremely localised.  There could in theory be responses to trace elements absorbed through the skin but unfortunately most of the known effects are negative

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Offline DoctorBeaver

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #4 on: 14/12/2005 15:15:48 »
I've wondered about the placebo effect too. But I've heard of it working for animals (yeah, I know... anecdotal yet again)
 

ROBERT

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #5 on: 16/12/2005 12:30:03 »
I don't know about copper jewelry, but gold rings reduce erosion in rheumatoid arthritis:-
http://www.healthcentral.com/drdean/408/34826_2.html
Gold rings certainly have a physical effect - it shows on X-ray, so it is not a placebo effect.
However it is not clear whether this is a mechanical or chemical process.
 

another_someone

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #6 on: 16/12/2005 15:40:36 »
quote:
Originally posted by ROBERT

I don't know about copper jewelry, but gold rings reduce erosion in rheumatoid arthritis:-
http://www.healthcentral.com/drdean/408/34826_2.html
Gold rings certainly have a physical effect - it shows on X-ray, so it is not a placebo effect.
However it is not clear whether this is a mechanical or chemical process.



Not sure that one can say that because it has a physical manifestation that it cannot be a placebo effect.  As far as I understand, rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune response, and the immune system can be affected the placebo effect.  The placebo effect may have psychological origins, but it is still a physical effect (i.e. it can manifest itself in physical changes in the body).

I am not trying to say that this jewellery business is merely placebo, only that the appearance of physical processes associated with it does not, to my mind, rule out the possibility.
« Last Edit: 16/12/2005 15:42:26 by another_someone »
 

Offline rosy

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #7 on: 16/12/2005 16:08:53 »
I thought the assumed basis of the placebo effect was that if you expect something to do you good it may do so despite the fact that the real effect has a psychological origin?
So the effect of wearing a wedding band for 50 years would be quite unlikely to have a purely placebo effect on a single finger joint? I'd always assumed that the magnetic/copper jewellery thing was a placebo but this sounds like it must be based on something physical/chemical.
Not terribly useful in its present form, since wearing rings next to all the joints likely to be affected by arthritis would be a bit inconvenient, unless they can figure out a mechanism for it which can be applied in a more helpful way!
 

ROBERT

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #8 on: 16/12/2005 16:14:33 »
Only the fingers which have gold rings are less eroded, this cannot be a placebo effect.
I agree (auto)immunity can be modulated by psychological stress (via the release of cortisol), however this psychological/hormonal/immunological effect would not just affect the fingers with rings.

In addition, as Rosy says, people with arthritis have been gaining a benefit from wearing gold rings for decades without being aware of the possibility that gold rings are theraputic. Being aware of and believing in a therapy is essential for the placebo effect.
« Last Edit: 19/12/2005 14:27:03 by ROBERT »
 

ROBERT

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #9 on: 19/12/2005 14:20:14 »
Some people have an allergic reaction to Nickel jewelry:-

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/263770.stm

Nickel allergy seems to establish the precedent that wearing metal jewelry can (permanently) alter the immune system.
So the protective effect of gold rings in people with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), an immune disorder, could be due to a chemical/immunological effect.

Whether chemical or mechanical, the gold ring effect is localised: a RA sufferer would have to wear nothing but a golden suit of armour to achieve total protection from the disease.
 

Offline chris

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #10 on: 20/12/2005 08:24:23 »
No one has mentioned yet, in relation to gold wedding rings and rheumatoid arthritis, that injected gold salts were until recently used as a disease-modifying drug in the treatment of rheumatoid. Gold preparations have largely fallen out of favour because they have a bad side effect profile and there are now kinder ways to achieve the equivalent effects.

The following, by Alan Matsumoto and Joan Bathon from Johns Hopkins in the US, is a synopsis of the therapeutic use of gold salts as disease-modifying agents in the context of rheumatoid.

Intramuscular Gold (Myochrysine, Solganal)
Gold is effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis when it is given intramuscularly. Intramuscular gold salts were, until the 1990's, the most often used DMARD agents. They are rarely used now due to side effects and very slow onset of action. An oral gold compound (Auranofin) is also available but its efficacy is limited.

d-Penicillamine is also a relatively toxic drug and is, like injectable gold, prescribed primarily for patients with persistent aggressive disease who have failed to achieve remission with less toxic agents.

Mechanism: A number of mechanisms have been postulated, but how gold works in patients with rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown.

Dosage: Myochrysine or Solganal therapy is started at 10 mg intramuscularly, 25mg is then given the second week, then 50mg is given weekly until a response has occurred or until a total of 1 g has been given. If there is a favorable response, therapy is tapered to 50mg every 2 weeks for 3 months, then every 3 weeks for 3 months and then finally to a maintenance monthly dose. No response after a total of 1g should be considered a treatment failure. Monthly gold should be continued indefinitely.

Usual Time to Effect: Effects are achieved within 4 to 6 months or after administration of 1g of gold.

Side Effects: Approximately 35% of patients on gold therapy experience side effects and this often leads to discontinuation of the drug. Prior to each gold injection, patients should have a complete blood count and urine test for protein. The most common reaction is a rash, which can vary from a simple pruritic erythematous patch to a severe exfoliative dermatitis. Ulcerations and mucositis of the mouth, tongue, and pharynx can occur. If a mild mucocutaneous eruption occurs, therapy should be interrupted. If the eruption abates, therapy can be restarted at a 10-15mg weekly, titrating upwards to 50mg weekly with careful monitoring for further rash.

Up to 10% of patients have mild proteinuria due to a gold induced membranous glomerulonephropathy that can progress to the nephrotic range. Patients with a positive urine dipstick for protein should be evaluated with a 24-hour urine collection and gold therapy stopped if proteinuria exceeds 500mg/24 hours. Mild proteinuria generally resolves with the cessation of therapy. Occasionally patients will have isolated microscopic hematuria on gold therapy. If monitored closely gold therapy can be continued but other causes of hematuria must be excluded.

Immune thrombocytopenia, granulocytopenia, and aplastic anemia occur uncommonly but are absolute indications for cessation of gold therapy. Myochrysine, and less often Solganal, can produce a nitritoid reaction (flushing, dizziness, or fainting) occurring immediately after the gold injection. Rarely, there is a paradoxical increase in musculoskeletal pain that requires discontinuation of treatment.

(Source : http://www.hopkins-arthritis.som.jhmi.edu/rheumatoid/rheum_treat.html)

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Re: copper and magnetic jewlery
« Reply #10 on: 20/12/2005 08:24:23 »

 

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