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Author Topic: Do all organisms see the same wavelengths for light?  (Read 2100 times)

Offline JasonWaterfalls

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Why do human eyes only register information from the visible spectrum of light? Do all organisms only see in the visible spectrum? Or does each species (Or even individuals within a species) have access to slightly different wavelengths of light?

I would think that evolving the ability to see in a vast light spectrum (one that includes infrared, for example) would be beneficial towards survival, but I don't know if any organisms have done that.


 

Offline RD

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Do all organisms see the same wavelengths for light?
« Reply #1 on: 09/04/2010 07:20:53 »
... one that includes infrared, for example) would be beneficial towards survival,
but I don't know if any organisms have done that.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared_sensing_in_snakes


Quote
Some animals, including birds, reptiles, and insects such as bees, can see near-ultraviolet light. Many fruits, flowers, and seeds stand out more strongly from the background in ultraviolet wavelengths as compared to human color vision.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet#Biological_surveys_and_pest_control
« Last Edit: 09/04/2010 07:24:08 by RD »
 

Offline LeeE

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Do all organisms see the same wavelengths for light?
« Reply #2 on: 09/04/2010 14:54:37 »
Why do human eyes only register information from the visible spectrum of light?

Because the 'visible' spectrum of light is defined as that which can be seen (registered) by the human eye.
 

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Do all organisms see the same wavelengths for light?
« Reply #2 on: 09/04/2010 14:54:37 »

 

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